1-16 of 16 results  for:

  • Composer or Arranger x
Clear all

Article

Rudolf A. Rasch

(b Amsterdam, Nov 16, 1664; d Batavia, Dutch East Indies, Oct 4, 1721). Netherlands poet and playwright . Born into a wealthy family, he studied law in Leiden and Utrecht. He was one of the most important and prolific Netherlands poets and playwrights of the decades around 1700, although his works are now little esteemed. He wrote numerous song texts, as well as librettos for ...

Article

Anthony Parr

(b London, Jan 1, 1879; d Coventry, June 7, 1970). English writer. Closely associated with Cambridge and the Bloomsbury group, he campaigned actively against censorship. His travels in Europe and India yielded two of his best-known novels, A Room with a View (1908) and A Passage to India...

Article

(b Tbilisi, 9/Oct 21, 1899; d Tbilisi, July 10, 1972). Georgian composer . He studied at the Leningrad Conservatory, where his teachers included Shcherbachyov, Kushnaryov and Shteynberg. After graduating in 1931, he was music broadcasts editor for Trans-Caucasian and Georgian radio (until 1937). He was President of the Union of Composers of the republic of Georgia, ...

Article

[Gadzhiyev, Dzhevdet]

(b Nukha [now Seki], 5/June 18, 1917). Azerbaijani composer. He studied at the Azerbaijan State Conservatory (1935–8) and at the same time composed the first examples of the symphonic poem in Azerbaijan. In 1938 he entered the Moscow Conservatory, where he was a pupil of Alexandrov and Vasilenko. In 1945 he and Kara Karayev completed the heroic-patriotic opera Veten (‘Fatherland’; I. Idayat-zade and M. Ragim), which was performed in Baku on 4 May that year; it won a State Prize in 1946. After World War II Hajiyev returned to Moscow Conservatory for further composition studies with Shostakovich (1945–7). He was artistic director of the Baku PO (1947–8) and from 1947 on the staff of the Azerbaijan State Conservatory (rector 1957–69). Characteristic of his style are monumental forms, programmatic development, an expressive astringent polyphony and frequent recourse to the mugam...

Article

Svetlana Sarkisyan

(b Erevan, Sept 28, 1920; d March 28, 2012). Armenian composer. In 1941 he graduated from the Erevan Conservatory, where he later taught composition. He continued his studies in Moscow at the House of Armenian Culture (1946–8) and in 1954 was appointed artistic director of the Armenian PO. He was made a People’s Artist of the USSR in 1970. The predominantly lyrical character of his work arises from peasant music, while the improvisations of the ashughner (folk minstrels) have fundamentally influenced his style. His opera Sayat‘-Nova (A. Khandjyan; 1969, Erevan), based on the life of a prominent 18th-century ashugh, represented the culmination of his preoccupation with ashugh music. In it the synthesis of improvisation and songstyle with other elements forms the backbone of the work and sets the tone for his later musical vocabulary. His other work for the stage is the musical comedy Medsapativ muratskanner...

Article

Svetlana Sarkisyan

(Sergey )

(b Erevan, Jan 14, 1930). Armenian composer . He graduated in 1953 from the conservatory in Erevan, where he studied composition with Grigor Egiazaryan; he completed postgraduate studies at the Moscow Conservatory under Aram Khachaturyan in 1957. From 1962 to 1968 he was director of the Alexander Spendiaryan Theatre of Opera and Ballet in Erevan, and in 1979 he received a State Prize of the USSR for his opera-ballet David Sasunskiy (‘David of Sasun’). He has been Artistic Director for Armenian radio and television, and since 1986 principal of the Erevan Conservatory and professor of composition; in 1986 he was made a People’s Artist of the USSR.

Stage works, chiefly ballets, occupy a fundamental place in Hovhanisian’s output. His early music shows the influence of Bartók and Stravinsky. In the 1970s he began to mix vocal and choreographic action, strikingly so in the opera-ballet David of Sasun (3, V. Galstyan after an Armenian epic; Erevan, Spendiaryan Theatre, ...

Article

(William Edward)

(b London, 1840; d London, April 1902). English conductor and composer. He worked first as a music hall pianist in London, then went to India (conducting a theatre company, c1875) and soon after settled in Melbourne. There he wrote criticism for The Age and composed three stage works. His first, Alfred the Great, written in collaboration with Fred Lyster (brother of W. S. Lyster), was an ‘extravaganza’ including arrangements of popular airs and set pieces, and the third, also incorporating airs, tended towards the genre of pantomime; between them came I due studenti (set in 16th-century Spain) which includes large concerted numbers but is chiefly dependant on monologues. In 1891 Plumpton returned to London and the next year was appointed conductor at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre; he composed numbers for the burlesque King Kodak (Terry’s, 30 April 1894) and later served as musical director at the Palace Theatre....

Article

(b Khodzhent [now Khundzhan], Aug 24, 1929). Tajik composer . In 1952 he completed studies in composition at the national division of the Moscow Conservatory, where his teacher was B. G. Fere. He subsequently studied composition with B. I. Zeydman at the Tashkent Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1962. From 1962 until 1986 he served as chairman of the Tajik Composers’ Union. He has taught at the Institute of Arts since 1979, becoming a professor there in 1986. Among other honours, he received the Tajik State Prize in 1970.

Inspiration for many of Saifiddinov’s works came from his Tajik heritage; his first opera, Pulot va Gulru (‘Pulat and Gulru’), composed in 1956, was the first national opera by a Tajik composer. With a libretto by S. Severtsev based on the novel Odamoni chovid (‘Eternal Souls’) by Rakhim Dzhalil, the four-act opera was orchestrated by Edison Denisov, A. Nikolayev and A. Pirumov and first staged in Dushanbe on ...

Article

William Y. Elias

[Karl ]

(b Heidelberg, Nov 13, 1897; d Beit Zayit, nr Jerusalem, Jan 15, 1974). Israeli composer and conductor of German birth . A pupil of Richard Strauss at the Berlin Academy of Arts, he became a répétiteur at the Berlin Staatsoper, sang at the Hamburg Opera and conducted in Baden-Baden. After settling in Jerusalem in 1933, he became the first music director of the Jerusalem Broadcasting Service in 1936. In 1938 he founded the Israel Radio SO (now Jerusalem SO), and from 1957 to 1962 he was director of the Israel Broadcasting Authority’s Transcription Service. In Germany he was active in reviving Handel’s Rodelinda and in 1944 he organized the first Bach and Handel festival in Jerusalem.

On his arrival in Israel, Salmon became influenced by the folk music of the region, which resulted in such works as the Symphonic Suite on Greek Themes (1943) and the Sephardic Suite...

Article

(b Kvemo Khviti, 14/Aug 27, 1900; d Tbilisi, July 18, 1965). Georgian composer and conductor. He studied at the Tbilisi Conservatory (1920–28) and then helped to found a music school at Batum, where he was both director and teacher of music theory. From the 1930s he was active as a conductor in Tbilisi as well as teaching the opera class at the conservatory (1937–9) and directing its opera studio (from 1951). His operas Gantiadi (‘Daybreak’, 1926) and Deputat (‘The Deputy’, 1940) were both performed in Tbilisi. He also published writings on Rimsky-Korsakov and Shalyapin and studies of several operas.

Article

William Y. Elias

[Joseph]

(b Pinne, nr Poznań, Sept 18, 1910). Israeli composer of Polish birth. After studying at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik with Heinz Tiessen, Hindemith and others, he went to Palestine in 1934. He was director of the Rubin (formerly Jerusalem) Academy of Music from 1948 to 1952, and from 1950 he taught at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, becoming professor in 1971. A pioneer of electronic music, he became director of the Israel Centre for Electronic Music in 1961. He won several prizes, among them the State of Israel Prize (1971).

Many of Tal’s early works were based on biblical subjects or epic events in Jewish history. However, in style he remained faithful to his European background and was not affected by the trends which dominated most Israeli compositions in the 1940s and 50s, namely Jewish folklore or eastern musical traditions (the maqām) of the region. By that time Tal was writing 12-note music and gradually his use of dodecaphonic elements became less constrained. A prolific composer in many genres, he also incorporated electronic music into many of his compositions....

Article

Svetlana Sarkisyan

(b Constantinople, 1837; d Smyrna, Feb 25, 1898). Armenian composer and conductor . He studied in Constantinople, then at the Milan Conservatory (1861–4). On his return to Armenia he took part in the activities of the Armenian Musical Society; he also worked with the Gusanergakan Music Theatre and with the Arevelyan T‘adron, the theatre of the Constantinople Armenians. In 1868 he completed the opera Arshak Erkrord (‘Arshak II’), to a libretto by T. T‘erzian, which marked the beginning of Armenian national opera. Excerpts were performed in Constantinople, Venice, Paris and Vienna during the composer’s lifetime. The score, which was thought to have been lost, was discovered in Erevan in 1942, and a version revised by Shahverdyan and Khodjia-Eynatov to a libretto by A. Gulakyan was given in 1945. In the 1870s Tchukhatjian wrote the comic operas Arifi khardakhutyunê (based on Gogol’s comedy The Inspector General), Kyose K‘ehya...

Article

Stephen Johnson

(b Karshagan, Burlyu-Tyubinsky, Kazakhstan, 28 Feb/March 13, 1913; d Alma-Ata, April 2, 1960). Kazakh composer. He studied at the Kazakh opera studio attached to the Moscow Conservatory, 1938–44. He continued composition lessons with E. G. Brusilovsky until 1946 and then with V. G. Fere and Myaskovsky at the Moscow Conservatory, graduating in 1951. He taught at the Alma-Ata Conservatory from 1953, and was president of the governing body of the Composers’ Union of Kazakhstan from 1956 to 1960. He was made a National Artist of the USSR in 1959. His first opera, Amangel’dï, to a libretto by G. Muzrenov, was written in collaboration with Brusilovsky in 1945; his second, Birzhan i Sara (‘Birzhan and Sara’), followed a year later: both had their first performances at the Kazakh Theatre of Opera and Ballet. Birzhan i Sara won a USSR State Prize in 1949. Tulebayev was also the composer of the official Kazakh anthem....

Article

Marita P. McClymonds

( fl Venice, 1731–53). Italian librettist . He wrote mainly opera seria texts, which were set for Venetian theatres by Albinoni, Galuppi, Giuseppe Scarlatti and Bertoni, among others. His plots derive from ancient history and are often set in Persia or the Middle East. In the early works the stanzas of aria texts have irregular numbers of lines, but the later works have the rhymed double quatrains typical of aria texts for the rest of the century. Most conform to the strictest standards of the Arcadian reform libretto: a succession of recitatives and exit arias and perhaps a duet for the principal couple. Occasional irregularities can be found, however. Il trionfo della costanza of 1731 has an aria with interruptions by pertichini (one or more other characters). Two operas have more than one ensemble. Ergilda (1736) has a duet and a quintet, both in Act 2, and Candalide...

Article

Elise Kirk

(b Manjing, Jiangsu, April 20, 1935). Chinese composer. He graduated from the Central Institute of Music in Beijing, then for political reasons was sent to Xingjiang, where he worked for 20 years as a farm labourer. In 1979 he became conductor of the Beijing SO; in 1984 he joined the faculty of the Chinese Music Conservatory, where he is professor of composition and director of the Composition Research Centre. A widely recognized Chinese composer, Jin has written in all genres. His operas comprise A Warm Breeze Outside (1980), Savage Land (1987, First International Art and Music Festival, Beijing) and Sunrise (1990). In 1989 Savage Land won a prize at the Third International Music Theater Workshop in Munich. It was given its North American stage première in January 1992 by the Washington Opera (Eisenhower Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington, DC) to great acclaim, the first opera with a Chinese libretto (by Wan Fang, after her father’s play ...

Article

Masakata Kanazawa

[Kōsaku ]

(b Tokyo, June 9, 1886; d Tokyo, Dec 29, 1965). Japanese composer . After graduating from the Tokyo Music School in 1908, he went to the Berlin Hochschule, where he studied composition with Bruch and Karl Leopold Wolf. While still a student he distinguished himself as a composer of symphonic and chamber music, and in 1913 completed his first opera, Ochitaru tennyo (‘The Depraved Heavenly Maiden’). To prepare for its performance he returned to Tokyo in January 1914; the outbreak of World War I prevented him from going back to Germany. He formed the Tokyo PO (not identical with the later organization) under the patronage of Baron Koyata Iwasaki, and conducted its first concert, the first ever by a Japanese orchestra, in May 1915. By this time he was composing prolifically. Some works, like the opera Alladine et Palomides, were planned and never composed. In December 1917 he went to the USA for the first time; he remained there until ...