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Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz and Joseph Vella Bondin

(Matteo)

(b Valetta, Nov 16, 1715; d Naples, Oct 1760). Maltese composer and teacher. His grandfather, who was French, settled in Malta in 1661. Abos's cousin Carol Farrugia paid for him to go to Naples as a child and receive his musical training at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù. An entry in the 1729 account book of the institution lists a payment to a ‘Maltese maggiore’ for copying a ‘new work by Sig Francesco Durante, Dixit’. Abos's principal teachers at the conservatory would have been first Gaetano Greco, then Durante and Gerolimo Ferrara (not Leonardo Leo). His first opera for Naples was Le due zingare simili, an opera buffa staged at the Teatro Nuovo in 1742. In the same year he took teaching posts at two Neapolitan conservatories: the Poveri di Gesù Cristi, where he succeeded Alfonso Caggi as secondo maestro and assisted Francesco Feo until the institution was dissolved in ...

Article

Gloria Eive

(b Faenza, bap. Dec 31, 1716; d Faenza, Oct 12, 1785). Italian violinist, composer and teacher. He studied with Tartini, probably between 1730 or 1731 and 1733, by which date his name appears in the list of musicians at Faenza Cathedral, as third (and last) violinist under the direction of his brother, Don Francesco Alberghi, maestro di cappella. In 1742 he was referred to in Faenza chronicles as ‘Paolo Alberghi, Professore’, and both his virtuosity and his compositions – sonatas and violin concertos – were extravagantly praised. In 1753 he became first violinist and, on his brother’s death in 1760, maestro di cappella as well; he retained both positions until his death. Alberghi supplemented his small salary from the cathedral by playing for civic festivities and for the two academies of Faenza, and by composing and teaching; among his pupils were Bernardo Campagnoli, Antonio Bisoni, Cristoforo Babbi and possibly Giuseppe Sarti (unconfirmed). A portrait of Alberghi in the Biblioteca Comunale of Faenza (which, together with the Archivio Capitolare del Duomo, contains much biographical material in manuscript) indicates that he was blind in one eye....

Article

Peter Ross

[Hans Kaspar]

(b Zürich, Dec 26, 1695; d Zürich, June 23, 1755). Swiss composer and music pedagogue. The year of his birth has been given incorrectly in some sources as 1697. His father Joseph, originally a tailor and from 1692 a schoolteacher, planned a theological training for Johann Caspar, who was his second son. After study at the cathedral school, the Collegium Humanitatis, and (from 1715) the theology class, Bachofen gained the title V.D.M. (verbi divini minister) in 1720. In 1711 he joined the collegium musicum at the chapter house, and in 1715 he became a member of one that met at the German School. In 1720 he became a singing teacher at the lower grammar school. His small income compelled him to seek a secondary source of income, from trading in violin strings. Despite disputes with officials and colleagues, he was appointed, after J.K. Albertin’s death in ...

Article

Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

Article

Mary Cyr

[not Jean-Baptiste]

(b Lunel, 1710; d Paris, Dec 1, 1772). French haute-contre singer, music teacher, cellist and composer. His début in 1733 at the Paris Opéra, according to La Borde, was in the monologue of Pélée, ‘Ciel! en voyant ce temple redoutable’ from Act 3 of Collasse's Thétis et Pélée (1689). He soon joined the Italian troupe, performing in divertissements between the acts of operas. After three years he returned to the Opéra and took several minor roles between 1737 and 1745 in Rameau's works: Un Athlète in Castor et Pollux (1737), Un Songe in Dardanus (1739), Lycurgue in Fêtes d'Hébé (1739), and Tacmas (replacing the well-known haute-contre Tribou) in the third entrée of Les Indes galantes (1743 revival). In 1743 he sang the title role in the première of Boismortier's ballet-comique, Don Quichotte chez la Duchesse, with the famous soprano Marie Fel as Altisidore. Two years later he retired from the opera to devote himself to teaching and playing the cello. He became first cellist of the orchestra at the Comédie-Italienne in ...

Article

Jean-Paul Montagnier

(b Mantes-la-Jolie, 5/June 6, 1665; d Paris, July 6, 1734). French composer, harpsichordist, theorist and teacher. He probably learnt music in the maîtrise of the collegiate church of Notre Dame, Mantes, and in that of Evreux Cathedral. According to the Etat actuel de la Musique du Roi (1773) he then studied with Caldara in Rome. In 1692 Bernier was living in the rue Tiquetonne in Paris and was teaching the harpsichord. On 20 November 1693 he failed to win the post of maître de musique at Rouen Cathedral in competition with Jean-François Lalouette. He was appointed head of the maîtrise of Chartres Cathedral on 17 September 1694 and remained there until 18 March 1698, when he obtained a similar position at St Germain-l'Auxerrois, Paris. A Te Deum performed before the king at Fontainebleau on 24 October 1700 was very successful, and was sung again in several Parisian churches in ...

Article

Michael Talbot

(b Bologna, April 8, 1666; d Bologna, March 30, 1747). Italian composer and pedagogue. Having received his initial musical training in Bologna, he was employed as a singer in Rome between 1687 and 1690, attached to the choirs of S Luigi dei Francesi and S Agostino. Returning to Bologna, he was appointed singing master at the Scuole Pie in 1693; later he also instructed the seminarists. In 1698 his Regole facilissime per apprendere con facilità e prestezza li canti fermo e figurato were published anonymously. On 22 March 1703 he was admitted to the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. He joined the choir of S Petronio as a bass in January 1705, holding this post until his death.

Bertalotti's authorship of the Regole facilissime was confirmed in 1706 by a revised edition under the title Regole utilissime per apprendere con fondamento e facilità il canto fermo (Bologna, 1706, 3/...

Article

Robert Fajon

(b Lyons, c1683; d Paris, March 2, 1760). French composer, teacher and opera singer. The main source of information about him is the Parfaict brothers’ Dictionnaire des théâtres, which states that Bouvard entered the Opéra at a very young age to sing soprano parts, with a ‘voice of such a range that its like had never been heard’. After his voice broke, when he was about 16, he spent a couple of years in Rome. He was back in Paris by February 1701, where his first (Italian) air appeared in a collection published by Ballard. In 1702, thanks to the patronage of M. de Francine, the Académie Royale de Musique performed his first opera, Médus, with great success, but in 1706 Cassandre, composed in collaboration with Bertin de La Doué, was a failure. Throughout the years 1701–11 Bouvard regularly published airs in Ballard’s collections, initially airs sérieux...

Article

Edward R. Reilly

(b Provence, c1690; d Paris, Jan 13, 1768). French flautist and teacher, active in Germany. Marseilles is sometimes cited as his native city, but 18th-century sources indicate only that he came from Provence. As a young man he was taken to Constantinople by the French ambassador, and there, sometime before 1712, taught Johann Jacob Bach, J.S. Bach's elder brother. In November 1715 Buffardin entered the service of Augustus II in Dresden, and was soon regarded as one of the outstanding players in the court orchestra. Under Augustus III his stipend of 500 thalers was raised to 1000, and in 1749 he was pensioned. During his years in Dresden he maintained contacts with his homeland, and in 1726 and 1737 performed in the Concert Spirituel in Paris. He returned to France in 1750 and on 24 July of that year performed for the Dauphine. A letter by Buffardin concerning the use of quarter-tones on the flute appeared in the ...

Article

James L. Jackman

revised by Paologiovanni Maione

(b Naples, 1692; d Naples, Jan 19, 1740). Italian composer and teacher. He was the son of Vito Cesare and Antonia Ricca Caballone. He studied with Veneziano and Perugino at the Neapolitan Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto. In 1716 he married Teresa Muscettola whose sister Antonia was married to the violinist Francesco Barbella and was the mother of the violin virtuoso Emanuele Barbella; according to Burney, the famous violinist first learnt counterpoint from Caballone. The only one of Caballone's sons to follow him as a musician was Gaspare, who later spelt his name ‘Gabellone’. Michele's life and works are sometimes confused with those of his son; in addition some sources mistakenly claim that he was the teacher of Faustina Bordoni Hasse, who in fact studied with Michelangelo Gasparini.

Caballone is not known to have held any regular teaching position, and he died in poverty. Towards the end of his life he became a novice in the confraternity of the Congregazione dei Musici in Naples, and at his death the brothers there voted to bear the expenses of his funeral and burial. These were on the scale due to a full member, presumably a mark of the professional regard in which he was held....

Article

Giuseppe Vecchi

(b Bologna, Oct 19, 1690; d Bologna, July 7, 1774). Italian composer and teacher. A priest at S Petronio, he studied first plainsong and cantus figuralis and then, under Floriano Arresti, counterpoint. In 1717 he was received into the Accademia Filarmonica as a singer and in 1719 as a composer, serving six times as principe and holding other important offices. In 1740 he was named deputy maestro di cappella to G.A. Perti at S Petronio and in 1756, when Perti died, succeeded him, holding the post until his death. He was a highly regarded teacher and had many pupils. Carretti composed much sacred music in both the strict and concertante styles, publishing a Credo corali, for one and two voices and optional organ (Bologna, 1737), and some sacre canzoni in the anthology La ricreazione spirituale (Bologna, 1730). The largest collection of his manuscript works is at S Petronio (others are in ...

Article

Lowell Lindgren

(b Rome; d ?London, after 1741). Italian teacher of languages and editor of librettos . He was in London by 1723, when he published A New Method for the Italian Tongue: or, a Short Way to Learn It. Its title-page identifies him as ‘a Roman, Master of the Latin, Spanish and Italian Languages; living at Mr. Wallis’s in Lisle-Street, near Leicester-Fields’, and its list of subscribers includes Ariosti, Bononcini, Geminiani, J. J. Heidegger and John Rich, the poet Paolo Antonio Rolli and many diplomats (including Riva of Modena). Rolli refers to Cori as Padre or Fra ‘Ciro’ in five extant epigrams and declares that he was defrocked and became a freemason. Rolli also describes him and the aged ‘Roscio’ (Giacomo Rossi) as teachers of Mongolese Italian who exercised their poetic ability where the ‘cembalo alemanno’ (‘German harpsichord’) had banished good sense. Cori as well as Rossi may thus have adapted texts for Handel in the 1730s....

Article

David Fuller

revised by Bruce Gustafson

(b Rouen, April 10, 1707; d Paris, Jan 21, 1795). French organist, teacher, composer-arranger and author of methods on performing practice; son of Gaspard Corrette. Though little is known of his life, his works, which span nearly 75 years, provide an extraordinarily broad view of ordinary light music in France during the 18th century, and his methods are a rich source of information about performing practice and music of the period. He was married on 8 January 1733 to Marie-Catherine Morize. They had a daughter Marie-Anne (1734–c1822) and a son Pierre-Michel (1744–1801), who became an organist.

Corrette first established his reputation by becoming musical director of the Foire St Germain and the Foire St Laurent, where he arranged and composed vaudevilles and divertissements for the opéras comiques (1732–9). From 1737 until its closure in 1790 he was organist at Ste Marie within the temple of the ...

Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz

(b Villa Santa Maria, Chieti, ?1709; d Naples, July 29, 1785). Italian composer and teacher. He was the brother of Michaele Cotumacci (b c1682), composer of a cantata for four voices and violins, Progressi vittoriosi della Fede Cattolica ottenuti della predicazione di S Francesco di Sales ( I-Nf ); Carlo’s son, Matteo Cotumacci (1739–1804), was also a musician. Carlo Cotumacci, according to Burney, who visited him in 1770, was a pupil of Alessandro Scarlatti ‘in the year 1719’. He began his career as an organist serving various Neapolitan churches, for which he also composed. His earliest known dated work is a Missa di Requiem for two voices and organ (20 October 1727). In 1737 he became a member of the Neapolitan Congregazione dei Musici and in 1749 organist of the Casa dell’Annunziata. On 1 December 1755, after the death of Francesco Durante, he and Joseph Doll joined Girolamo Abos as ...

Article

Catherine Gas-Ghidina

(b Beauce, c1680; d c1760). French composer and music teacher. David studied music and composition with Nicolas Bernier between 1694 and 1698. From 1701 to 1706, he was chief of music for Philip V of Spain, and moved to Lyon in 1710, where he earned an excellent reputation. He also served as “maître de musique” for the Prince of Monaco (1715–17), and was director at the Académie des Beaux-Arts at Lyon (1717–26). In this city he wrote most of his works, directed the music for ordinary events and visits by dignitaries, and instituted in 1737 the Concert Spirituel. The same year, David wrote Méthode Nouvelle […], a tutor for music and singing that is unique evidence of his work as a composer and music director still known in 1760. David evolved as a musician in the cosmopolitan cities of Paris and Lyon, mixing with the cities’ illustrious musicians and befriending Jean-Jacques Rousseau, even advising the latter on his first opera ...

Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz

[Giuseppe]

(d Naples, Aug 1774). German musician and teacher, active in Italy. Sponsored by the archbishop, Cardinal Spinelli, he entered the Neapolitan Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù on 15 December 1736, where he was registered as ‘Giuseppe Doll di Baviera, todesco’. His teachers were Francesco Durante and, after 1738, Francesco Feo. In 1749 his cantata Per la solenne esposizione del Ss sagramento ( I-FOLc ), on a text by Guiseppe Ercolani, was performed in Foligno. On 1 December 1755, after the death of Durante, he and Carlo Cotumacci joined Girolamo Abos as maestri at the Conservatorio di S Onofrio a Capuana in Naples. The institution’s Libro maggiore for 1755–7 shows that three teachers were treated as equals in rank and salary. Doll was the only non-Italian ever to become a maestro of a Neapolitan conservatory. In 1757 Gaetano Grossatesta, impresario of the Teatro S Carlo, characterized him as ‘giovane virtuoso e capece’ and suggested that he be commissioned with an opera, but nothing came of it. Mozart, who met Doll in Naples, wrote to his sister on ...

Article

Mary Cyr

(fl 1735–55). French composer, viol player and teacher (‘maître de viole’). He worked in Paris. Throughout his Pièces de viole op.2, dedicated to the Prince of Carignan, Dollé used the signs for vibrato and ornaments adopted by Marin Marais, and the second of his three suites includes a tombeau for Marais le père, a rondeau whose chordal style, use of the high register and vibrato (called ‘plainte’) recall the expressive playing of the late master of the viol. The Pièces op.3 contains 25 character pieces for six-string pardessus de viole, which are divided into three levels of difficulty. The titles of two pieces, La Roland and La Morel, suggest his acquaintance with the viol players Roland Marais and Jacques Morel. The sonatas in op.4, though consciously italianate in melodic style, with frequent sequences, syncopations and wide leaps, still reflect the French taste in expression and ornamentation. Op.4 includes five ...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

(d Paris, 1740). French violin teacher and dancing-master. He published Principes de musique par demandes et réponce (Paris, 1713, 3/1719/R, 4/1740), which is valuable for its systematic exposition of the French performing practice called notes inégales (unequal notes). He also published Principes de violon par demandes et par réponce, par le quel toutes personnes, pourant aprendre d’eux-mêmes a jouer du dit instrument (Paris, 1718, 2/1740), valuable for its explanations of the strict bowing patterns used in French dance music. Both treatises, although they reflected the conservative practice of the Lullian school, remained in print throughout the 18th century. At Dupont’s death legal documents referred to him as ‘marchand de musique’.

JohanssonFMP LabordeMP La LaurencieEF B. Gérard: ‘Inventaire alphabétique des documents répertoriés relatif aux musiciens parisiens conservés aux Archives de Paris’, RMFC, 13 (1973), 181–213 C.L. Schlundt and J.L. Schwartz: French Court Dance and Dance Music...

Article

David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(fl 1741–57). French composer and teacher of the harpsichord and hurdy-gurdy. He advertised himself as a student of (André) Campra and ‘other great masters’ in the Mercure (February 1753). His works are substantial in both quantity and quality, and merit something better than the total obscurity into which they have fallen, even though many are written for so unsatisfactory an instrument as the hurdy-gurdy.

In 1753 Dupuits opened a public school of music which by 1757 had expanded to include all instruments, and where ‘lessons in the various styles are given every day except Sundays and holidays, and three times a week concerts for learning ensemble and keeping in time’. At some time, probably in the 1740s, he was employed by the Duke of Cambray. He was either very friendly with the engraver Jean Robert or was willing to spend considerable sums on the appearance of his publications, for nearly all have handsome pictorial title-pages by that artist. The collection of songs ...

Article

Walter Blankenburg

revised by Dorothea Schröder

(b Schweinfurt, Nov 2, 1674; d Schweinfurt, Nov 22, 1751). German organist, composer and teacher. He was the son of a town musician and attended the Lateinschule and Gymnasium at Schweinfurt. In 1693 he went to Leipzig, where he studied theology and took part in musical performances directed by Kuhnau and N.A. Strungk. After taking the master’s degree, Englert was called back to his native town in 1697 to succeed Georg Christoph Bach as Kantor at St Johannis. He also worked as Präceptor at the Gymnasium, where he was appointed Konrektor in 1717 and Rektor in 1729. The demands of teaching may have induced him to exchange, in 1713, his Kantorat for the organist’s post at St Johannis, which he held until his death.

According to Mattheson, Englert wrote several cantata cycles and a great number of other works, mostly sacred. Stylistically his music was indebted to Kuhnau’s, as Schmidt observed in his description of 21 cantatas (then in ...