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Article

Giovanni Carli Ballola

revised by Roberta Montemorra Marvin

(b Alessandria, March 20, 1851; d Alessandria, May 2, 1894). Italian organist and composer. He began his musical studies with his stepfather, Pietro Cornaglia. From 1868 to 1871 he attended the Milan Conservatory, studying the piano with Antonio Angeleri and composition with Lauro Rossi and Mazzucato. His graduation exercise, the cantata Caino e Abele, won the first prize and a medal of honour. He toured abroad as a concert pianist, but from 1880 until his death was organist at the cathedral in Alessandria, where he also founded a school of composition, singing and piano, and conducted concerts for the Associazione filarmonica alessandrina. He composed three operas, Isabella Spinola (1877, Milan), Maria di Warden (1884, Venice) and Una partita a scacchi (1892, Pavia), the latter based on Giuseppe Giacosa's popular comedy. In these works, which did not have much success, Abbà Cornaglia remained uninfluenced by the innovatory tendencies of the ‘Scapigliatura’ and of Catalani and by the new ...

Article

Nicholas Michael Butler

(fl 1773–1820). Scottish violinist, viola d’amore player, and teacher. Abercromby was born in Scotland but educated in French Flanders. After hearing Abercromby play at a St Cecilia Society concert in Charleston in 1773, Josiah Quincy Jr. of Boston wrote, “A Frenchman just arrived, [who] played a first fiddle and solo incomparably, better than any I ever had heard.” During the American Revolutionary War, Abercromby remained in Charleston, where he advertised to teach guitar and dance, and performed at concerts during the British occupation of the city. He left Charleston in 1791, and over the next two decades lived in Bucks County, PA, Baltimore, Richmond, and Lexington. By 1815 he was in Tennessee, where he opened a music academy in Nashville.

J. Wooldridge, E. E. Hoss, and W. B. Reese: History of Nashville, Tennessee (Nashville, TN, 1890) J. Carden: Music in Lexington before 1840 (Lexington, KY, 1980) N. B. Butler...

Article

John Koegel

(b Puerto Príncipe, Cuba, ?Nov 28, 1844; d Havana, ?Dec 31, 1918). Pianist, music teacher, arranger, conductor, composer, and lawyer of Cuban birth, naturalized American. Born into a prominent family in Puerto Príncipe, Cuba (present-day Camagüey), Agramonte strongly supported the movement for independence from Spain. He studied music and the law in Cuba, Spain, and France. After vocal studies with Enrico Delle Sedie (1822–1907) and François Delsarte (1811–71) at the Paris Conservatory, he immigrated to the United States, settling in New York in 1869, where he remained until after Cuban independence in 1898. He became a US citizen in 1886.

In the 1870s and 1880s, Agramonte taught music at the Academy of Mount Saint Vincent in the Bronx. In the 1890s he taught with Dudley Buck and William Mason at the Metropolitan College of Music and ran his own School of Opera and Oratorio at his home, teaching singers such as ...

Article

Dieter Härtwig

(b Ballenstedt, July 13, 1790; d Berlin, Oct 8, 1873). German pianist, music teacher and composer, son of Carl Christian Agthe. He received his musical education from Ebeling in Magdeburg and Seebach in Klosterbergen before studying composition and counterpoint with M.G. Fischer in Erfurt. In 1810 he settled in Leipzig as a music teacher and second violinist in the Gewandhaus Orchestra, and there published his first compositions. He founded a music academy in Dresden with C. Kräger in 1823 which was publicly endorsed by Carl Maria von Weber; J.B. Logier’s methods of keyboard instruction were used there. In the next decade he set up similar institutes in Posen (1826), where Theodore and Adolf Kullak were his pupils, in Breslau (1831) and finally in Berlin (1832). He was forced to retire in 1845 because of weak eyesight. His compositions include at least nine opus numbers for piano (some with other instruments) and two manuscript songs in the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin....

Article

Antonio Iglesias

(b Logroño, April 14, 1795; d Madrid, April 12, 1855). Spanish pianist, composer and teacher. He was the son of Mateo Pérez de Albéniz, a keyboard player and composer, from whom he received his first music lessons. Later he went to Paris for further training; he studied piano with Henri Herz and composition with Friedrich Kalkbrenner, and became a friend of Rossini. Upon his return to Spain he was organist at the church of S María in San Sebastián, and later at a church in Logroño. When Queen María Cristina founded the Madrid Conservatory he was appointed a professor, on 17 June 1830, and in 1834 he became organist of the royal chapel. He gave private instruction to Queen Isabel II, and was the first to introduce modern methods of keyboard technique and pedagogy into Spain. Although his compositions are of little interest, and are generally inferior to his father’s sonatas, he wrote a ...

Article

Dorothy C. Pratt

(b Constantinople, 1881; d Chamonix, July 27, 1954). Armenian cellist. He studied with Grützmacher and while a student played chamber music with Brahms and Joachim. At the age of 17 he appeared as the soloist in Strauss's Don Quixote with the composer conducting and scored a triumph; he was then invited to play concertos with Nikisch and Mahler. In 1901 he settled in Paris, where Casals saw some of his fingerings and recognized that Alexanian shared his own, then revolutionary, ideas on technique and interpretation. Many years' collaboration followed, leading to the publication in 1922 of their joint treatise Traité théorique et pratique du violoncelle and in 1929 of Alexanian's analytical edition of the solo cello suites of Bach. Alexanian was professor of the Casals class at the Ecole Normale de Musique from 1921 to 1937, when he left for the USA. His classes in Paris, Baltimore and New York attracted artists and students from all over the world, and his influence extended far beyond his own pupils (among them Maurice Eisenberg and Antonio Janigro) to such cellists as Feuermann, Cassadó, Piatigorsky and Fournier. He was also a conductor of distinction....

Article

(b Stockholm, Aug 22, 1851; d Stockholm, May 20, 1918). Swedish pianist, teacher and composer. At the Swedish Royal Academy of Music (1867–74) he studied the piano first with Johan van Boom and then with Ludvig Norman, harmony with Otto Winge, the organ with Gustaf Mankell and composition with Berens. After further piano study with Hilda Thegerström (1874–6), he went to Berlin, where he became a pupil of Clara Schumann and Heinrich Barth and also studied composition at the Hochschule für Musik with R. Wüerst and Friedrich Kiel. During this period he frequently deputized as a teacher for Barth, both at the Hochschule and privately. He returned to Stockholm in 1884 and two years later founded a piano school, where at first he was the only teacher of the instrument, with Sjögren as teacher of harmony. The school gradually developed a more general curriculum, including courses in other instruments and in singing, and became the country’s outstanding private music school. Noted Swedish musicians who studied at the school (Anderssons Musikskola) include Stenhammar, Astrid Berwald, Wiklund, Fryklöf and Gustaf Heintze. Andersson was appointed professor of piano at the Stockholm Conservatory in ...

Article

Alicia Valdés Cantero

( b Havana, Oct 28, 1856; d Havana, June 30, 1930). Cuban composer, pianist and teacher . She studied first of all with her father, the pianist and composer Fernando Arizti (1828–88), and continued more formally with Francisco Fuente and Nicolás Ruiz Espadero. In 1887 a number of her piano works, including Danza, Mazurka and Reverie, were published in New York. She taught the piano privately and at Peyrellade’s Conservatorio de Música y Declamación, Havana, and gave recitals in Cuba and, in 1896, New York; she also wrote a manual of piano technique. In addition to several piano works, her compositions include violin pieces, two works for small band, and a piano trio (1893, the first chamber work to have been written by a Cuban woman); written in a traditional harmonic language, they are marked by melodic beauty and careful formal construction. Her piano writing shows the influence of Chopin. In ...

Article

Alan Walker

In 

Article

John Koegel

[y Ansola ]

(b Tolosa, Guipúzcoa, Spain, July 25, 1847; d Oakland, CA, Jan 27, 1915). Spanish-Basque composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher. Born into a family connected to the manufacture of berets, he studied solfège with the director of the Tolosa municipal band, and began piano and organ lessons with his parish organist. Arrillaga later studied at the Real Conservatorio de Música in Madrid—solfège with Hilarión Eslava (author of the famous solfège method), harmony with Rafael Hernando, and piano with Manuel Mendizábal. After receiving gold medals at the Madrid Conservatory for harmony and piano in July 1867, presented to him by Queen Isabel II, later in 1867 he began piano studies with Antoine-François Marmontel at the Paris Conservatoire. Around 1869, he traveled throughout Latin America, performing and teaching in San José, Costa Rica from 1870 to 1875. He moved to California in 1875, first to Los Angeles, and then soon thereafter permanently to San Francisco. He was noted for his work as a piano accompanist, performing with musicians such as singer Carlotta Patti and San Francisco guitarist-composer Manuel Ferrer. Arrillaga composed numerous instrumental and vocal works, including several for piano on Spanish themes (e.g., “Zortzico” and ...

Article

Boris Schwarz

(von)

(b Veszprém, June 7, 1845; d Loschwitz, nr Dresden, July 15, 1930). Hungarian violinist and teacher. He began his studies at the age of eight at the Budapest Conservatory with Ridley Kohne, continued them at the Vienna Conservatory with Jakob Dont (1857–8), and, after concert tours in the provinces, completed them with Joachim in Hanover (1863–4). After a successful début at the Leipzig Gewandhaus, he was engaged as orchestral leader at Düsseldorf (1864–6) and then at Hamburg where he also led a string quartet. Visiting London in 1868, he played Beethoven’s Trio op.97 at the Musical Union with Anton Rubinstein and Piatti. On Rubinstein’s recommendation, Auer was appointed to succeed Wieniawski as violin professor at the St Petersburg Conservatory in 1868; he remained there until 1917. He also taught outside Russia: in London during the summers of 1906–11 and in Loschwitz (Dresden) in ...

Article

(von )

(b Veszprém, Hungary, June 7, 1845; d Loschwitz, nr Dresden, Germany, July 15, 1930). Hungarian violinist and teacher. From 1868–1917, he taught violin at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where his pupils included Jascha Heifetz, nathan Milstein , Mischa Elman and Efrem Zimbalist. He helped to establish the Russian school of violin playing that included use of the “Russian bow hold” in which the middle of the index finger presses into the stick resulting in a noticeably high wrist posture. He famously rejected the original dedication of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto and only played the work after his own revisions to the solo part in 1893.

Auer left Russia in 1918 due to the revolution and settled in New York. He quickly scheduled a Carnegie Hall recital and was welcomed into the social circles of musicians such as Franz Kneisel and Donald Lambert. During the 1920s he taught at both the Institute of Musical Art (Juilliard) in New York and the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. His teaching career was an important link in the lineage of violin pedagogy extending back to Joachim. Auer also published an autobiography and two instruction manuals of which ...

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Article

Stuart Campbell

( b Nizhniy Novgorod, Dec 21, 1836/Jan 2, 1837; d St Petersburg, 16/May 29, 1910). Russian composer, conductor, teacher and pianist .

Balakirev was the son of a minor government official. His musical education began with his mother’s piano tuition and proceeded to a course of summer lessons in Moscow with Aleksandr Dubuque. At that time the leading musical figure and patron in Nizhniy Novgorod (and author of books on Mozart and Beethoven) was Aleksandr Ulïbïshev, and it was through his household pianist and musical organizer Karl Eisrich that Balakirev’s induction to music, embracing the crucial discoveries of Chopin and Glinka, continued. Eisrich and Ulïbïshev provided Balakirev with further opportunities to play, read and listen to music, and to rehearse other musicians in orchestral and choral works, including, when he was 14, Mozart’s Requiem. His first surviving compositions date from the age of 15. Balakirev’s formal education began at the Gymnasium in Nizhniy Novgorod and continued after his mother’s death in ...

Article

Elżbieta Dziębowska

(b Warsaw, April 16, 1858; d Warsaw, Sept 1, 1929). Polish violinist, conductor and teacher. He was a pupil of Apolinary Kątski at the Warsaw Music Institute (c 1871) and then studied the violin at the Moscow Conservatory with Ferdinand Laub and Jan Hřímalý; on completing his studies in 1876 he was awarded a gold medal. From 1877 he played frequently in Poland and also in England, France, Germany, Denmark, Austria, Sweden, Norway and Russia. He taught the violin and the viola at the Warsaw Music Institute (1886–1918), where he also directed the chamber music class and conducted the student orchestra; he was a member of the governing Pedagogical Council (1888–1901) and later was appointed director (1910–18). He was leader of the Warsaw Opera House orchestra, and from 1886 was conductor there. In 1892 he established his own string quartet. Barcewicz was one of the finest Polish violinists. He won great recognition for his beautiful, deep, full tone, excellent technique and individuality of interpretation. He had a large repertory, comprising chiefly the works of Classical and Romantic composers....

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N. Lee Orr

(b Florence, Aug 2, 1854; d Atlanta, GA, Nov 17, 1935). American pianist, conductor and teacher. He was born into one of the leading musical families in 19th-century America, which included Adelina Patti, and made his début as a pianist on 7 April 1865 in New York. His family soon moved to Philadelphia, where he studied the piano with Carl Wolfsohn before embarking for the Cologne Conservatory in 1872. Barili settled in Atlanta in 1880 and became the city's first professional musician, introducing many standard works, including Beethoven sonatas and later Gounod's Messe solennelle de Sainte Cécile. In 1883 he planned the first Atlanta Music Festival, which included a chorus of 300 accompanied by Carl Sentz's orchestra from Philadelphia. During that one weekend Barili introduced symphonies by Schubert (no.8), Haydn and Beethoven, as well as a number of Mendelssohn and Verdi overtures. That same year he conducted the chorus for Theodore Thomas and his orchestra. Barili developed a reputation as one of the finest teachers in the South, and many of his pupils achieved successful musical careers. His pioneering work in Atlanta laid the foundation for many of the city's musical institutions....

Article

James Methuen-Campbell

(b Pillau [now Baltiysk], nr Königsberg [now Kaliningrad], July 12, 1847; d Berlin, Dec 23, 1922). German pianist and teacher. Following early lessons from his father, a music teacher, Barth became a pupil of Ludwig Steinmann in Postdam. He remained with him for six years from 1856. Further teachers were von Bülow, Bronsart von Schellendorf and, for a short time, Tausig. He also took lessons in composition from Adolf Marx and Carl Weitzmann. In 1868 Barth was appointed a teacher at the Stern Conservatory in Berlin; he moved to the Hochschule für Musik in 1871, and was head of the piano department there from 1910 until his retirement in 1921. The Barth Trio, which he formed with Heinrich Karl de Ahna and Robert Hausmann, was highly esteemed. Barth's reputation as a thoughtful pianist with an especially wide repertory is reflected in his early advocacy of Brahms's music. A successful teacher, his pupils included Howard Brockway, Katherine Ruth Heyman, Wilhelm Kempff, Artur Rubinstein and Aline van Barentzen, the latter three of whom were particularly acclaimed as interpreters of Beethoven....

Article

Lesley A. Wright

[Adrien ]

( b Bayonne, France, June 7, 1828; d Asnières-sur-Seine, France, Aug 13, 1898). French composer, pianist, and teacher . After studying with Leborne, he won the Prix de Rome in 1854. The music section of the Académie praised his envoi, the French opera Don Carlos (1857), for its craftsmanship, fine orchestration, and strong sense of the stage, and in 1858 they awarded him the Prix Édouard Rodrigues for his oratorio Judith, over the only other competitor, Bizet. That year Barthe married mezzo-soprano Anna Banderali.

The Théâtre-Lyrique opened a competition in 1864 on Jules Adenis’s libretto La fiancée d’Abydos, for Prix de Rome winners whose work had not yet reached the stage. Barthe was the unanimous choice of the jury, above Émile Paladilhe and three others. Extensive changes were made during rehearsal and the première took place on 30 December 1865. Critics were largely positive, though they noted resemblances to Meyerbeer, Félicien David, Gounod, and others, and found the libretto somewhat tedious. After a respectable 21 performances (in Paris and Bayonne) the work disappeared from the repertory....

Article

Elżbieta Dziębowska

(d Lemberg [now L'viv], after 1862). Polish composer, teacher and flautist, probably of Czech descent. He was choirmaster at Lemberg Cathedral, and from 1838 to 1844 vice-director of the music society in Lemberg. Later he taught singing and the flute in Kiev. He composed a three-act vaudeville Skalmierzanki, to a libretto by J.N. Kamiński (1828, manuscript in PL-Wn ), and three operas: Syn i córka (‘Son and Daughter’), Więzienie Jana Kazimierza we Francji (‘The Imprisonment of Jan Kazimierz in France’) and Twardowski na Krzemionkach, a five-act comic opera to another libretto by Kamiński. He also wrote sacred music, including a setting of the Salve regina (Lemberg, 1858), and some piano works, notably Collection de polonaises (1826) and L'aurora boreale (Lemberg, 1839).

SMP R. Bohdan [K. Estreicher]: ‘Raptularzyk podrożny’ [Travel diary], Ruch muzyczny (1857), 319 K. Estreicher: ‘Podrożnik raptowny’ [Travel diary], Ruch muzyczny...

Article

Hugh Macdonald

revised by Valerie Walden

(b Nancy, March 29, 1773; d Paris, Sept 26, 1849). French cellist, teacher and composer. He and Lamare joined Baillot in Paris in 1792 to play Boccherini quintets. He was a pupil of the elder Janson and became a cello professor (second class) at the newly founded Paris Conservatoire in 1795. His appointment was suspended in 1802 but he resumed office from 1805 until 1827 when he retired to undertake a number of tours. During the Empire he continued to perform chamber music with Baillot and other faculty members, and joined the Opéra orchestra. He became principal cello in the imperial chapel and retained the post during the Restoration. In 1818 he became a member of the Société Academique des Enfants d’Apollon. Although he was much esteemed in France, the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung of April 1820 described his playing as cold. Fétis, too, inclined to that view, though he praised his pure tone and fine intonation. Baudiot played a Stradivari cello of ...