1-11 of 11 results  for:

  • 17th c./Early to mid-Baroque (1600-1700) x
  • Publishing and Recording Industry x
  • Music Manager or Administrator x
Clear all

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1634). English music printer. He printed a few musical works between 1610 and 1615, only his initials ‘E.A.’ appearing on certain imprints. He printed Thomas Ravenscroft’s A Briefe Discourse (1614) and John Amner’s Sacred Hymnes of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts for Voyces and Vyols (1615). His address was ‘neere Christ-Church’ in London. His name appears among a list of printers granted printing monopolies by James I and his successors as ‘Edw. Alday, to print sett songs et al’, but he apparently made little use of any such privilege.

Humphries-SmithMP E. Arber, ed.: A Transcript of the Registers of the Company of Stationers of London, 1554–1640, 1–4 (London, 1875–7/R); v (Birmingham, 1894/R) R.B. McKerrow: ‘Edward Allde as a Typical Trade Printer’, The Library, 4th ser., 10 (1929–30), 121–62 J. Morehen: ‘A Neglected East Anglian Madrigalian Collection of the Elizabethan Period’, ...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Edinburgh, Dec 1621). Scottish bookseller and printer. By 1589 he was an importer of foreign books; in 1601 his name appeared in a psalm book printed in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, to be sold in Scotland. In 1610 he became a publisher in Edinburgh, issuing a famous folio Bible in that year and many psalters (with the melodies), as well as books of Scottish court poetry, mathematics and theology. One of the most interesting of the psalters is that of 1615 in which, for the first time, the 12 Common Tunes were printed as a group and given distinctive titles.

After Hart’s death, his widow (d Edinburgh, 3 May 1642) published more psalm books with the imprint ‘the Heires of Andro Hart’. Among these is the most important 17th-century Scottish church music publication, the 1635 psalter, which contains 143 psalm settings, nearly all by Scottish composers: 104 of Proper Tunes, 31 of Common Tunes and 8 imitative settings ‘in reports’....

Article

Miriam Miller

(fl 1679–99). English music publisher and bookseller. He was one of the London music publishers to employ the printer John Heptinstall, who printed the five books of his Thesaurus musicus, a series of song anthologies (1693–6), and A Collection of New Ayres: Composed for Two Flutes … in 1695. He is generally taken to be the author of a work printed for him by Nathaniel Thompson in 1679, A Vade Mecum for the Lovers of Musick Shewing the Excellency of the Rechorder, and he also published John Banister’s The Most Pleasant Companion or Choice New Lessons for the Recorder or Flute (1681) and some of the songs from Henry Purcell’s The Indian Queen (1695; neither Hudgebut nor his publishing partner, John May, appears to have asked the composer’s permission in this venture). Hudgebut had several addresses during his career: he was first at the Golden Harp and Hoboy in Chancery Lane, then at St Paul’s Churchyard and lastly in the Strand, near Charing Cross. (...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Halberstadt, 1581; d Danzig [now Gdańsk], 1666). German publisher and bookseller. He began printing in Danzig in 1609, and soon became the principal Reformation printer in Poland, with the support of King Władysław IV. He was a specialist in historical and linguistic books, although he also published a good deal of music. Much of this comprised monophonic songbooks, printed in a single impression using a Gothic notation typeface. In ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1600–30). Italian printer, bookseller and publisher. He came from a family of scholars, artists and publishers in Milan. (Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo had sponsored the publication of treatises by Gaffurius and Bonaventura da Brescia in the years 1492–1500.) He entered into partnership with the Tini family in 1603 and until 1612 they produced much music, primarily the work of local composers. From 1613 to 1630 Lomazzo worked on his own; a number of his publications appeared from the presses of other printers. He appears to have been musically literate, for he selected the contents of some of his numerous anthologies himself: they include sacred and secular music by many composers, including Ghizzolo, G.S.P. de' Negri, Orfeo Vecchi, Gastoldi and Riccardo Rognoni. He also published treatises by Scaletta and Rognoni.

His son Francesco Lomazzo was also a printer. He published about a dozen books between 1603 and 1619...

Article

Miriam Miller and Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1625). English bookseller. Presumed to be a younger brother of Humfrey Lownes, with whom he was associated in several offices and commercial ventures throughout his life. He was apprenticed to Nicholas Ling from 1582 to 1591, and began publishing books in 1596 in St Dunstan’s Churchyard, Fleet Street. He moved to ‘The Bishop’s Head’ in St Paul’s Churchyard about 1605. In 1611, along with the bookseller John Browne and the printer Thomas Snodham, he acquired the rights to the music publications of Thomas East, which the three men began issuing as assignees under the music-publishing patent held by William Barley. When Barley died in 1613 or 1614, they assumed Barley’s patent, although there is no record of any formal transfer, or indeed of any effort to renew the patent when it expired in 1619. There is no evidence that Lownes was himself a music printer. He was succeeded on his death by his son-in-law George Latham, who continued publishing music....

Article

Henri Vanhulst

(b Harderwijk, 1613/14; d Amsterdam, bur. Dec 5, 1684). Dutch bookseller, printer and publisher . His shop ‘in’t Musyckboeck’ was in the Stoof-Steegh, Amsterdam, and his business (not exclusively musical) began in 1640; his heirs, Alida and Maria Matthysz, continued it from 1681 to about 1720. He printed several editions for booksellers in Amsterdam (E. Cloppenburch, J. Jansz, Ludwig Elzevier etc.) and brought out others on his own account, including reissues. He sometimes accompanied the text with a Dutch translation or replaced it with an original Dutch text, as in Gastoldi’s Balletten … met drie stemmen: ende nu verrijckt met de vierde partije … ende op gheestelijcke gesangen gheset (1641). Matthysz also published compositions and treatises by local composers, including Ban, Jacobus Haffner, Joseph Butler, Van Eyck, G.Q. van Blankenburg and Carolus Hacquardt. Among his most important publications are collections of instrumental pieces, 20 Koninklijcke fantasien...

Article

(fl 1607–41). Italian bookseller and printer, active in Florence . He matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali on 15 November 1607 and by 1614 had become head of the printing firm founded by Giorgio Marescotti and continued by his son Cristofano. He was also a singer trained in the choir of Florence Cathedral. Pignoni made an auspicious entry into music printing in 1614–15 with no fewer than six editions, including masses and motets by Marco da Gagliano, madrigals by Giovanni del Turco, and Giulio Caccini’s Nuove musiche e nuova maniera di scriverle. This initiative was prompted by a generous, if shortlived, financial investment in the firm (in June 1614) by three prominent Florentine patrons, Giovanni del Turco, Lodovico Arrighetti and (for Cosimo del Sera) Giovanni Battista da Gagliano: hence the imprint ‘Zanobi Pignoni, e Compagni’.

Thereafter Pignoni diversified his interests, printing poetry, occasional items and descrizioni...

Article

Colin Timms

( b Samarugio, Rome, c 1580; d Rome, March 10, 1673). Italian music publisher and book dealer . Described in documents of the period as a ‘cartulario’ and ‘librarius’, he built up his publishing concern from a bookdealer’s business that he had probably founded himself. It was situated in central Rome (Parione), and his sign, which appears in his publications, was a hammer. Following his marriage in 1607 he had at least four children of whom one, Giovanni (b 17 July 1612; d 30 Sept 1675), followed his father’s occupation. Both father and son were buried at S Maria in Vallicella (the Chiesa Nuova) in Rome.

Antonio Poggioli published most types of instrumental and sacred and secular vocal music, including reprints of Arcadelt, Lupacchino and Tasso, a complete edition of Cifra’s motets and important anthologies of motets. His publications date from 1620 to 1668 and represent the work of seven Roman printers, among them Robletti, Masotti, Grignani and Mascardi. Giovanni Poggioli is known only as the editor of the later of the two, slightly different, editions of the ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

revised by Bianca Maria Antolini

(b c1643; d Feb 1, 1727). Italian publisher, printer and bookseller. From 1676 he was a member of the Venetian Printers' Guild, and in the same year he began printing thanks to the financial support of the composer Natale Monferrato, maestro di cappella of S Marco, publishing his Salmi concertati a 2 voci con violini e senza (op.11). He conducted his business, under the sign of King David playing the harp, at S Giovanni Grisostomo in the house of Monferrato. On the composer's death in 1685, Sala became the sole proprietor of the firm. In 1682 he published, anonymously, L’armonia sonora delle sonate, an anthology, edited by himself, of 12 sonatas for two violins and basso continuo by various composers.

An Indice dell’opere di musica sin hora stampate da Giuseppe Sala in Venezia (?1714) enumerates his output of psalms, motets, cantatas and sonatas, in particular those of Bassani, Monferrato, Giulio Taglietti and Corelli; he published at least 14 editions of Corelli’s first five opus numbers. The index also shows that he published psalms by Sartorio, D.F. Rossi, Cazzati and F.M. Benedetti, motets by Legrenzi, G.B. Allegri, Bonporti, G.M. Bononcini and Gasparini, cantatas by Caldara, G.L. Gregori and Albinoni and sonatas by G.B. Vitali, Legrenzi, de Castro, Corelli, Torelli, Ercole Bernabei and Benedetto Marcello. Altogether Sala printed 151 publications between ...

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b Steinau an der Strasse; d Frankfurt, cJan 20, 1629). German music dealer and music publisher. In 1602 he and the printer Wolfgang Richter founded a printing and publishing association in Frankfurt which existed until 1615 under the name of Typographia Musica; it was one of the leading German music publishing firms before the Thirty Years War, and concentrated on Catholic church music, also publishing numerous collections of dances and lieder. Stein published, among others, works by Giulio Belli, Finetti, Getzmann, Giovannelli, Pacelli, Jacob Regnart, Jacob Reiner, Melchior Schramm, Thomas Simpson, Lodovico Viadana and Zucchini....