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Article

Ausilia Magaudda and Danilo Costantini

(b Milan, 29 June–6 Aug 1647; d Milan, Sept 2, 1712). Italian composer and tenor. His family was originally from Centonara, in the province of Novara, where the surname Chiapetta (Chiappetta, Chiappetti, Ciapeta, Ciapetta) was so common that ‘de Alessandri’ was used to identify the branch to which the composer belonged. It was because of these origins that his contemporary L.A. Cotta included him in a list of Novara musicians, describing him as ‘Giulio de Alessandri Chiapetta di Centonara in Riviera di S Giulio’. The documents which refer to him and his compositions use both surnames separately, and so ‘Giulio d’Alessandri’ and the ‘Canon Chiapetta’ have been identified as two different composers. He was ordained priest on 6 April 1669. On 10 December 1676 he was appointed a tenor and vicemaestro di cappella of Milan Cathedral. During this period he collaborated with P.F. Tosi, who worked at Milan Cathedral from ...

Article

Thomas Walker

revised by Jennifer Williams Brown

(b Naples, 1630; d Naples, Jan 21, 1665). Italian composer. He studied at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo from 1642 to 1649 and about 1658 was named maestro di cappella of the city of Naples. In 1655 he composed for the Teatro S Bartolomeo La fedeltà trionfante (G.C. Sorrentino), one of the first operas originally written for Naples. Prota-Giurleo (DBI) ascribed to him two other dramatic works: Le magie amorose (1653, Naples) and Il trionfo della pace (G. Gastaldo; 1658, Naples). The libretto of Le magie is a revision of Marco Faustini's Rosinda; if Alfiero was involved, he may simply have revised Cavalli's music. Bianconi proposes O. Gaudioso and A. De Santis as the composers of Il trionfo. Alfiero's only surviving work is a hymn ( I-Nf ).

DBI (U. Prota-Giurleo) B. Croce: I teatri di Napoli, secolo XV–XVIII (Naples, 1891/...

Article

[Lione, Leo, Leon]

(b Chios, 1588; d Rome, Jan 19, 1669). Italian theologian and scholar of Greek origin. He went to Italy as a child and studied philosophy, theology, and classics in Rome at the Greek Catholic Collegio di S Atanasio from 1599 to 1610. After a period in Chios he studied medicine in Rome until 1616. Thereafter he was employed in the Vatican Library and was responsible for moving the Biblioteca Palatina from Heidelberg to Rome in 1622–3. In 1661 he succeeded Luca Holstenio as chief curator of the Vatican Library. He wrote extensively on a wide range of subjects including theology, Byzantine studies, classical antiquity, and Italian letters. He was a member of the Accademia degli Incogniti, which played an important role in early Venetian opera. He is significant for the history of music by virtue of his Drammaturgia … divisa in sette indici (Rome, 1666), a compendious and surprisingly accurate list of dramatic works of all kinds, including opera librettos, published in Italy; it also lists many unpublished works. A second, vastly enlarged and updated edition by Giovanni Cendoni, Apostolo Zeno, Giovanni degli Apostoli, and others unnamed (Venice, ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1634). English music printer. He printed a few musical works between 1610 and 1615, only his initials ‘E.A.’ appearing on certain imprints. He printed Thomas Ravenscroft’s A Briefe Discourse (1614) and John Amner’s Sacred Hymnes of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts for Voyces and Vyols (1615). His address was ‘neere Christ-Church’ in London. His name appears among a list of printers granted printing monopolies by James I and his successors as ‘Edw. Alday, to print sett songs et al’, but he apparently made little use of any such privilege.

Humphries-SmithMP E. Arber, ed.: A Transcript of the Registers of the Company of Stationers of London, 1554–1640, 1–4 (London, 1875–7/R); v (Birmingham, 1894/R) R.B. McKerrow: ‘Edward Allde as a Typical Trade Printer’, The Library, 4th ser., 10 (1929–30), 121–62 J. Morehen: ‘A Neglected East Anglian Madrigalian Collection of the Elizabethan Period’, ...

Article

Colin Timms

(b Rome, c1585; d Rome, Sept 5, 1629). Italian composer. He was brought up in Rome. He was a private pupil of G.B. Nanino from April 1594 and a choirboy at S Luigi dei Francesi from October 1595; by February 1596 he was learning to compose. He left S Luigi in January 1602, after his voice had broken, but returned as an alto in December and remained until May 1603. He is next heard of at the collegiate church of S Maria Maggiore at Spello, where he was maestro di cappella from at least June 1608 (possibly from 1606) to January 1609. He then moved back to Rome and was maestro di cappella of S Maria in Trastevere from September 1609 to March 1610 and of S Maria Maggiore from then to his death. He married in 1616 and had five children. Allegri was one of the first to write independent instrumental accompaniments in vocal chamber music: his ...

Article

Jerome Roche

revised by Noel O’Regan

(b Rome, 1582; d Rome, Feb 7, 1652). Italian composer and singer, brother of Domenico Allegri. From 1591 to 1596 he was a boy chorister and from 1601 to 1604 a tenor at S Luigi dei Francesi, Rome, where the maestro di cappella was G.B. Nanino. According to Allegri’s obituary he studied with G.M. Nanino (see Lionnet). He was active as a singer and composer at the cathedrals of Fermo (1607–21) and Tivoli, and by August 1628 he was maestro di cappella of Santo Spirito in Sassia, Rome. He joined the papal choir as an alto on 6 December 1629, under Urban VIII, and was elected its maestro di cappella for the jubilee year of 1650. In 1640 his fellow singers elected him to revise Palestrina’s hymns (necessitated by Urban VIII’s revision of the texts), which were published in Antwerp in 1644. His contemporaries clearly saw him as a worthy successor to Palestrina and a guardian of the ...

Article

Edmond Strainchamps

(b Florence, Nov 16, 1567; d Florence, July 15, 1648). Italian composer and lutenist. Cesare Tinghi, the Medici court diarist, called him (in Solerti) ‘Lorenzo [or Lorenzino] todesco del liuto’, which has encouraged the notion that he may have been German, but his baptismal record confirms that he was from Florence. He entered the ranks of salaried musicians at the Medici court on 15 April 1604 as a lutenist; during the period 1636–7 he was referred to as maestro di liuto. In January 1622 he was appointed guardaroba della musica, and in due course he was also placed in charge of the pages who played, sang and danced in court entertainments. He continued to serve the court until his death. He seems chiefly to have written instrumental music. Only two vocal pieces by him are known: Tu piangi, a madrigal for solo voice and continuo published in Antonio Brunelli's ...

Article

[Roggerio]

(b Castelnuovo di Garfagnana; fl 1612). Italian music editor and composer. He edited Responsoria Hebdomadae Sanctae, psalmi, Benedictus, et Miserere, una cum missa ac vesperis Sabbati Sancti, for eight voices and continuo (Venice, 1612²). It includes pieces by 20 composers, among them Croce and Viadana, and two are anonymous; Argilliano himself, with 11 pieces, is the best-represented composer....

Article

Jerome Roche

(b ?Pavia; fl 1609–29). Italian music editor and singer. Since he was known as ‘magister et reverendo’ he must have taken orders. He was a bass singer in the choir of Pavia Cathedral from 1609 to 1626. He is of greatest interest as the collector of four noteworthy anthologies of north Italian church music published in Venice (RISM 16214, 1624², 1626³ and 16295); all contain motets except the third, which consists of litanies. The volumes include eight works by Monteverdi, seven of which are found in no other printed sources, and ten unica by Alessandro Grandi (i) and four by Rovetta (his earliest published works). Other prominent north Italians represented are Stefano Bernardi, Banchieri – who dedicated his Gemelli armonici (1622) to Calvi – Ignazio Donati, Ghizzolo, Merula, Orazio Tarditi and Turini. Calvi himself contributed motets to the first two and included pieces by his ...

Article

(b Naples; fl 1645–53). Italian music editor and composer. He was a Franciscan monk and on a title-page of 1653 is called ‘maestro di musica’. He edited a small volume of five-part sacred music (RISM 1645¹), which had gone into a fourth impression by 1650 (1650...

Article

Tim Carter

(fl 1618–25). Italian printer active in Florence. Although he was printing books by December 1618, his first printed music dates from 1623 when he issued two volumes by Filippo Vitali (including Vitali’s Il secondo libro de madrigali a cinque voci). In 1625 he printed Francesca Caccini’s La liberazione di Ruggiero dall’isola d’Alcina...

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(b Wawrzeńczyce, 1606; d Vienna, May 21, 1674). Viennese printer of Polish birth. He studied in Kraków, where he also learnt printing and managed a small press. In 1640 he married the widow of the printer Matthäus Formica (fl 1615–39) and assumed management of his shop on the Kölnerhof; later he became a printer for the university and court book printer. In 1649 he bought the remainder of the Formica shop, including the music type of Leonard Formica (fl 1590–1615), and in 1655 he moved to a larger building on Unteren Bächerstrasse; known as the Cosmeroviushaus, it had five presses, more than 150 sets of type and a foundry. At his death his printing properties were transferred to his son Johann Christoph (1656–85) and thence, as the ‘Cosmerovische Erben’, to Johann’s widow Theresia (until 1686), Matthäus’s widow Susanna Christina (until 1698...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(fl Bologna, 2nd half of the 17th century). Italian printer. He was active in Rome before transferring his business to Bologna in 1638. He apparently published no music himself, but the ‘Eredi di Evangelista Dozza’, namely Carlo Manolesi and Pietro Dozza, probably Dozza’s son, issued music during 1663...

Article

Endter  

Theodor Wohnhaas

German family of printers and publishers. Wolfgang Endter the elder (1593–1659) began his career as a journeyman printer in Altdorf and Herborn before training as a bookseller in the shop of his father, Georg Endter the elder (1562–1630), in Nuremberg. He owed his leading position among German book printers and publishers during the Thirty Years War to his editions of the Bible and Protestant devotional works, whereas his brother Georg Endter the younger (1585–1629) and his descendants specialized in the printing and distribution of Catholic devotional literature. On being ennobled by Emperor Ferdinand III in 1651 Wolfgang the elder retired from his business in favour of his sons Wolfgang Endter the younger (1622–55) and Johann Andreas Endter (1625–70). After the death of Wolfgang the younger Johann Andreas continued to manage the firm on behalf of his brother’s heirs; after his death the heirs separated. Wolfgang Moritz Endter (...

Article

Fei  

Stanley Boorman

Italian family of music printers. They were active in the 17th century. In 1615 the first publication by Andrea Fei (b c1579; d 6 Feb 1650), an edition of Guidetti’s Directorium chori, appeared at Rome. In 1620 he opened a second house in Bracciano, apparently as publisher to the duke, and quickly put out an edition of Arcadelt’s first book of madrigals. Both branches continued during the rest of the printer’s life, and both published music sporadically over the next two decades. Between 1640 and 1647 Fei published more music at both addresses, much of it being financed by others, in particular the Roman bookseller G.D. Franzini. Several volumes in a largely conservative output were edited by Florido de Silvestri. In 1657 Andrea’s son Giacomo Fei (b c1603; d 21 April 1682) inherited the firm and retained the Bracciano branch for some years. He seems to have printed mostly music until ...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Aberdeen, Nov 1675). Scottish music publisher. He was a stationer at Aberdeen, where he began publishing in 1656. In 1662 he and his son John (b Aberdeen; d Aberdeen, late 1704 or Jan 1705) were appointed official printers to the town and university by Aberdeen town council. They immediately ventured into music printing, presumably with town council backing; their first musical publication was Songs and Fancies: to Thre, Foure, or Five Partes, both Apt for Voices and Viols (1662, 2/1666, 3/1682), which was Scotland’s first secular printed music book. Its presentation and contents now appear old-fashioned, resembling London madrigal partbooks around 1600; it is prefaced by a short ‘Exposition of the Gamme’, lifted almost word for word from Morley’s A Plaine and Easie Introduction of 1597. The three editions vary slightly in content; altogether they contain 77 different songs, of which there are 23 by Dowland and his English contemporaries, six other English anonymous partsongs, ten ballad tunes, six Italian songs by Gastoldi with English texts, seven ‘new English-Ayres’ from recent Playford publications and, most importantly, 25 Scottish items, 16 from the 16th century. Curiously, only the cantus partbook was ever issued; it seems likely that Forbes was printing with sales to burgh music schools in mind (the Aberdeen music school is mentioned on the title-page). As music-school pupils mostly had unbroken voices, a preponderance of cantus copies would be required; other voice parts were perhaps supplied by Forbes in manuscript to individual order. The ...

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Stanley Boorman

(fl early 17th century). Italian music printer. In partnership with Lucrezio Nucci, he was active in Naples when it was a centre for music printing: the firms of Carlino & Pace and Sottile were also flourishing at the time. The bookseller P.P. Riccio financed a number of Gargano and Nucci's early publications including Teatro de madrigali (RISM 160916) edited by Scipione Riccio. Between then and 1618 the firm published nearly 20 musical editions, mostly of secular music by local composers such as Camillo and Francesco Lambardi, Maiello, Montella and Montesardo. The most important publication was Cerone's treatise El melopeo y maestro (1613).

Lucrezio Nucci published a few musical works on his own during 1616 and 1617. His 1616 edition of Alessandro Di Costanzo's first book of madrigals is remarkable for its colophon, which refers to an earlier edition in the following terms: ‘Naples, Giovanni Battista Sottile, ...

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Susan Bain

(fl Rotterdam, mid-17th century). Dutch musician and publisher. He may be related to Géry Ghersem, maître de chapelle to Philip II in Spain at the beginning of the 17th century. Archives at Rotterdam show that Geertsom rented a house there from 1665 to 1669; his publications of 1656–7 give his address as ‘Rotterdam, in de Meulesteegh’. Four music collections, published between 1656 and 1661, are known. The composers represented are all Italian, including many active in Rome: Abbatini, Carissimi, Stefano Fabri (ii), Gratiani, Marcorelli (= Marco Aurelli) and Tarditi. The volume Scelta di motetti, for example, contains (with one exception) motets by composers who held positions at various churches in Rome. Geertsom appears to have had business connections with the firm of Phalèse family in Antwerp. Not only does his music type bear a distinct resemblance to that of Phalèse, but also ‘Mr Jan Gersem’ is listed in a ...