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Bandiri  

Set of two or more single-headed frame drums, with or without circular metal jingles, and a kettledrum used by members of the k’adiriyya Islamic sect of northern Nigeria. It accompanies the zikiri (creed formula by which a person acknowledges that he is a Muslim). The frame drum is held in the left hand and beaten with the fingers of the right....

Article

Heather Laurel

Rock group formed in 1991 by the songwriter Dave (David John) Matthews (b Johannesburg, South Africa, 9 Jan 1967; guitar and vocals) in Charlottesville, Virginia. Matthews recruited Carter Beauford (b Charlottesville, 2 Nov 1957; drums and vocals), LeRoi Moore (b Durham, NC, 7 Sept 1961; d Charlottesville, 19 Aug 2008; saxophones), Steffan Lessard (b Anaheim, CA, 4 June 1974; bass), and Boyd Tinsley (b Charlottesville, 16 May 1964; violin and vocals). Cutting across stylistic backgrounds, including jazz and rock, the musicians formed an unconventional rock ensemble that drew a loyal local fan base. Its alternative instrumentation, emphasized by the lack of electric guitar, made the group a surprising candidate for the large-scale commercial success that followed. The band has spent much time on tour, incorporating long improvisatory jams into their concerts, which have been more representative of their sound than their studio recordings. From their earliest days, they have allowed fans to record their live shows, helping foster their wide following. Their first major-label release, ...

Article

Dyegele  

Konin Aka

Term for a xylophone or ensemble of xylophones and kettledrums of the Senufo people in the Korhogo region of the Ivory Coast. The ensemble normally comprises three or four frame xylophones, each with 12 bars slung on cords attached to the frame at each end. Under each bar is a gourd resonator with spider’s web mirliton. All the xylophones have the same pentatonic tuning; they are accompanied by three wooden kettledrums. The players wear iron jingles on their wrists. The ...

Article

Eluma  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[eruma]

Stopped flute ensemble of the Amba and Yira peoples of the border region of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The individual pipes are made from a plant locally known as lumaluma. The stopped lower ends of the pipes are decorated with tufts of animal hair or tassels of raffia, and Amba pipes are sometimes covered with plaited raffia. The instruments are played by men and boys, for various social and ceremonial occasions. Players dance in a circle around an ensemble of drums; participation is usually restricted to members of the same extended family or warrior group. Mbuti Pygmies in the same area also play similar pipes.

Formerly the term was applied to raft panpipes of the Amba and Yira. First reported in 1907, the instrument has now apparently disappeared. The embouchure was deeply cupped and the raft strengthened by three cross-bars.

M. Trowell and K. Wachsmann: Tribal Crafts of Uganda...

Article

Ronald Kinloch Anderson

revised by Tully Potter

English string quartet. It was founded in 1928 by Sidney Griller (b London, 10 Jan 1911; d London, 20 Nov 1993); Jack O'Brien (b Grahamstown, South Africa, 25 Oct 1909); Philip Burton (b Daventry, 1 May 1907; d Berkeley, CA, 19 May 1961); Colin Hampton (b London, 6 June 1911; d Oakland, CA, 10 Aug 1996). Griller studied with Hans Wessely and Editha Knocker. For a short time he was a pupil of Rowsby Woof, with whom O'Brien and Burton also studied at the RAM. Hampton was a pupil of Herbert Walenn. Lionel Tertis, in whose chamber music class at the RAM they first played together, encouraged them to form a permanent quartet. They were also coached by Arthur Williams, former cellist of the Klingler Quartet. After the success of their first London appearance in 1928 they began a career that rapidly brought them to the forefront of contemporary quartets. Their first tour in Europe in ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Daniel Avorgbedor

Orchestra founded in 1988 in Accra, Ghana, under the leadership of its conductor and founder Nana Danso Abiam. The orchestra of approximately 28 instrumentalists is guided by a creative and practical philosophy that calls for a return to indigenous traditions and resources. The leader integrates music, musical instruments and performers from various ethnic groups and from various African countries; financial limitations constrain the hiring and use of musicians and musical instruments from several African countries, however. The Ghanaian government, especially the Commission on Culture, actively supports both the ideals of the former President Kwame Nkrumah, a leader in the Pan-African and African Personality movement, and the related philosophy and objectives of the Pan-African Orchestra. Abiam composes and arranges most of the music, which is closely related to indigenous practices. Instruments of the orchestra include a variety of original African instruments: Kora (21-string plucked chordophone), gyilli (xylophone), axatse (shakers), adawuro and ...