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Richard J. Agee

In 

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Robert Stevenson

(b c1548; d Granada, June 28, 1591). Spanish composer, son of Santos de Aliseda. From about 1557 to September 1577 when he was ordained, he was a member of the choir of Granada Cathedral. On 8 June, 1580 the chapter accepted him as successor to his father without the customary public competition. As maestro de capilla he was required to give board and instruction to the choirboys, to provide daily lessons in polyphony and to compose chanzonetas and extremeses for important feasts. In 1589 he was relieved of these obligations because of ill-health. He died in poverty, like his father. None of Aliseda’s secular music survives. His solemnly expressive motets owe much to those of Morales in structure and style, particularly to the latter’s Emendemus in melius.

all in E-GRc or GRcr unless otherwise stated

Article

Robert Stevenson

(d Granada, July 4, 1580). Spanish composer. He was appointed maestro de capilla of Granada Cathedral on 19 November 1557 despite the opposition of his predecessor, Luis de Cózar, who intended his own nephew to succeed him. After an unsuccessful appeal to the archbishop, Cózar was forced to hand over the charge of the choirboys to Aliseda in May 1558. Aliseda had already begun to search for better singers, but was hindered by the poor salaries which the Granada Cathedral chapter offered.

Throughout his 23 years as maestro de capilla Aliseda won praise from the chapter for his diligent teaching, his punctuality and particularly for his care of the choirboys. In 1579, in appreciation of his merits, the chapter recommended him to Philip II for a prebend, and on 14 May 1580 voted him a gift of 12 ducats to aid him in his illness.

Aliseda's six-part motet ...

Article

Thomas W. Bridges

(fl Venice, 1572–1621). Italian printer. In February 1572 he witnessed a codicil to the will of Girolamo Scotto, in which he is described as a printer, not a bookseller, suggesting that he may have worked in Scotto’s shop in Venice at the time. After a brief attempt in printing music on his own in 1579, he resumed as a partner of Giacomo Vincenti, with whom he printed, between 1583 and 1586, about 80 books. A few were reprints of popular volumes by Arcadelt, Lassus, Marenzio, Palestrina, and Bernardino Lupacchino and Gioan Maria Tasso, but most were first editions of works by some 33 composers, of whom the best known are Asola, Bassano, Caimo, Gioseffo Guami, Marenzio, Stivori and Virchi, as well as anthologies. For their printer’s mark Vincenti & Amadino used a woodcut of a pine-cone, with the motto ‘Aeque bonum atque tutum’. When they began to print separately (from ...

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Richard J. Agee

In 

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Article

Donald W. Krummel

[Berg, Joachim; Montanus]

(b Lübeck, c1540; d Dresden, 1597). German printer. After apprenticeship with Jakob Lucius in Rostock and Johann Eichorn in Frankfurt an der Oder, he moved to Dresden, working at first with Matthäus Stökel. His music printing began in 1570 with vocal collections by Matthaeus Le Maistre and Antonio Scandello, followed by several Lutheran hymnals. After his death the press was continued by his widow and heirs, including his son Gimel II (fl 1610–37, made Hofbruckdrucker in 1616), then Gimel III (fl 1640–43), Christian and Melchior (fl 1643–88), Melchior’s son Immanuel (fl 1688–93) and eventually Melchior’s son-in-law, Johannes Riedel (fl 1688–1716). Their most ambitious and best-executed printing coincides with their finest music. Editions of Heinrich Schütz began to appear in 1618, including the Psalmen Davids (1619) and the second and third parts of the Symphoniae sacrae...

Article

(b Bar-le-Duc; fl Avignon, 1530–35). French type designer. He designed the first music type with round note heads, used in publications by Jean de Channey of works by Carpentras. Briard’s elegant notes are beautifully proportioned and teardrop-shaped, and he did not use ligatures, fig.7).

Printing & publishing of music, §I, 3(ii): Printing from type: Early history...

Article

(fl 1528–55). Music printer. He joined the chapel of Renée of France, Duchess of Ferrara, as a clerk between 1525 and 1528, and probably travelled with her household from Paris to Ferrara in September 1528. A Ferrarese document of 1549 describes him as a priest of the diocese of Clermont and almoner to Renée, and he also served there as clerk of the chapel and surgeon to Renée until 1555 or later. Together with his associates Henrico de Campis and Antonio Hucher, he was one of the first to use the single-impression method of music printing in Italy, a technique introduced to Paris early in 1528 by Attaingnant, which Buglhat may have learnt before leaving France. Campis, possibly related to the Lyonnaise music printer Jannot de Campis (fl 1504–10), is listed on the rolls of the Ferrarese court chapel as a singer from 1534 until 1549...

Article

Stanley Boorman

[Giangiacomo]

(fl 1597–1616). Italian printer. He appears to have begun printing at Naples in 1597 under contract to the bookseller Orazio Salviani; he later printed for other Neapolitan booksellers such as P.P. Riccio and G.B. Cimmino, and produced two collections of secular music edited by Marcello Magnetta (1613 and 1615). By 1598 he was collaborating in Naples with Antonio Pace, who also published on his own, and together they published madrigals by Dentice (1598) and Macque (1599); they also worked together at Vico Equense, but printed no music there. In 1600, publishing alone, Carlino was appointed stampatore della corte arcivescovale, a title given him on a collection of madrigals by Camillo Lambardi that he printed the same year. Much of his early production was devoted to the music of Montella. From 1607 for three years he was in partnership with Costantino Vitale. Their publications include madrigals by Meo and Dattilo Roccia (...

Article

[Castellioneus, Johannes]

( b c1484; d Milan, c1557). Italian printer . In 1504 he married a daughter of the printer Antonio Zarotto. His father, Zanotto da Castiglione, a sometime collaborator of Zarotto, printed some 90 books (1505–23), including an Ambrosian sacramentary and missal with music. Giovanni Antonio first printed in 1507, but with some regularity only from 1534. His 40-odd books include the first Milanese editions of instrumental music and part-music, printed in two impressions, with mediocre to excellent registration of the crisp and distinctive note forms, namely: Intabolatura de leuto de diversi autori (May 1536/R); Ruffo's Primo libro de motetti a cinque (June 1542); Mutetarum divinitatis liber primus, 5vv (RISM 1543³); and the Intavolatura di lauto … libro secondo of Francesco da Milano and P.P. Borrono (1548). Castiglione also printed Aaron's Compendiolo di molti dubbi (between 1545 and ...

Article

Zdeněk Culka

[Nigrin, Nygryn, Georg]

(fl Prague, 1572–1606). Czech printer. He served his apprenticeship under Kozel, probably before 1566. Between 1572 and 1606 he published many religious, philosophical, legal, medical and astronomical books, as well as sermons, felicitations and poems; he had begun printing music by 1578. He printed a series of works by the Slovenian composer Jacob Handl, as well as music by members of the Prague royal chapel (e.g. Carl Luython and Franz Sales), Johannes Nucius and such composers as Lomnický, Mitis z Limuz, Jevíčský, Barion, Knöfel and Benedikt-Nudožerský. In both volume and quality of production, Černý was one of the foremost printers of the time.

ČSHS

J. Vanický: ‘Nigrinovy hudební tisky’ [Nigrin’s musical prints], HRo, 12 (1959), 608–9 K. Chyba: Slovník knihtiskařů v Československu od nejstarších dob do roku 1860 [Dictionary of printers in Czechoslovakia from early times to 1860] (Prague, 1966), 71 P. Danek: ‘Nototiskanská cinnost Jirího Nigrina’ [The musical prints of Nigrin], ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Piedmont, c1480; d Avignon, c1539–40). French printer. He began his printing career in Lyons around 1500 as an apprentice to Jacques Arnoullet. On the latter’s death in 1504 or 1505, his widow Michelette du Cayre entrusted the press to Channey, who published a book under his own name in about 1505, using Arnoullet’s type. Assuming that he would have had to be in his mid-20s for such a responsibility, he was probably born about 1480. Another book with his name as printer was published in 1510, using his printer’s mark, a copy of the Aldine anchor and dolphin, for the first time.

Because Arnoullet’s sons were coming of age and were ready to take over their father’s business, Channey petitioned the Avignon town council in late 1512 for permission to establish a printing firm there. In August 1513 the first of many books with the Avignon address appeared in print. Michelette du Cayre followed him to Avignon, where she married him....

Article

Susan Bain

(b Antwerp, 1489; d Antwerp, Aug 17, 1562). South Netherlandish printer. Although active as a printer in Antwerp for more than 40 years, he did not become a member of the Guild of St Luke until 1557, towards the end of his life. In his long and prolific career (more than 170 books) he printed prognostications, ordinances, theology and devotional books, and a number of English heretical texts, printed clandestinely. On 15 September 1539 he received a six-year privilege for printing psalters with music, the first privilege to print music in the Low Countries. On 28 September of the same year he printed the first Dutch metrical psalter, Een devoot ende profitelijck boecxken (ed. D.F. Scheurleer, The Hague, 1889, 2/1977). This was followed, in 1540, by his Souterliedekens – Psalter Songs – which became immensely popular, being reprinted several times by Cock, and later by printers in both the southern and the northern Netherlands. These two publications were printed by double impression, the staves in red and the text and music in black, but with different music notation. The first used a small Roman neume typeface on a four-line staff; ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(b Dunwich, Suffolk, 1522; d Walden, Essex, July 23, 1584). English printer, father of Richard Day. He was one of the most successful general printers of his generation, but his music printing was almost entirely limited to two works: Certaine Notes set forth in Foure and Three Parts and The Whole Booke of Psalmes, Collected into English Metre by T. Sternhold, I. Hopkins & Others … with Apt Notes to Synge them withal, known as the Sternhold-Hopkins psalter. Certaine Notes was probably compiled before 1553 and partially printed in 1560, but it was not until 1565 that the whole anthology was completely issued, under the amended title Mornyng and Evenyng Prayer. Day first published The Whole Booke of Psalmes in 1562, under the terms of a monopoly granted to him by the crown in 1559 that gave him sole right to print the work, which became extremely popular. He had the patent of monopoly renewed in ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(b London, Dec 21, 1552; d before 1607). English music publisher, son of John Day. He was trained as a scholar, becoming a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, in 1574. Family pressures obliged him to return to his father’s business in London, and he was admitted to the Stationers’ Company in 1577. With his father he held several printing monopolies, including one that gave them sole right to print the Sternhold-Hopkins psalter, in which the metrical psalms were set to music. After his father’s death in 1584, Day never printed this work himself but assigned his rights to other printers; he authorized 46 separate printings, bringing the total printed under the monopoly to 82. The work was continually pirated and Day was involved in several legal actions. When Thomas Morley acquired a general music-printing monopoly from the queen in 1598, the terms conflicted with Day’s. Morley published Richard Allison’s ...

Article

Susan Bain

[Latius, Joannes; Latio, Giovanni]

(b Stabroeck, c1525; d Antwerp, 1566). Flemish printer. He became a citizen of Antwerp in 1545 and began to print in the same year; he served as one of the Town Printers from 1549 to 1566, being regularly mentioned in the Antwerp accounts. He printed more than 100 books reflecting the cosmopolitan life of Antwerp, including Flemish Bibles, law books, histories, classical texts, Spanish books and a dozen books by English Catholic authors. From 1554 he published a number of music books, either with the Antwerp teacher and composer Hubert Waelrant, who acted as the music editor, or on his own. Together, in the years 1554–6, Waelrant and De Laet published eight books of motets and four books of chansons by various composers. Alone, De Laet brought out a number of music publications including Lassus’s motets in 1556, the year of the composer’s visit to Antwerp; thus he was one of Lassus’s first publishers. De Laet also printed two editions of ...

Article

Suzanne G. Cusick

revised by Maureen Buja

(b Ghedi, nr Brescia, c1500; d Rome, 1565). Italian printer. His entire professional career was spent in Rome. From March 1526 to April 1527 he collaborated with the printer Giovanni Giacomo Pasoti of Parma on six of the eight music books Pasoti printed for the Roman publisher Jacomo Giunta. By 1531 Dorico was established as an independent printer and bookseller, producing at least five collections of music and one musical treatise during the next six years. In all the music books with which his name is associated from the 1520s and 1530s, Dorico used the double-impression method of printing; after Pasoti’s disappearance from Rome during the sack of 1527, Dorico retained possession of his types and decorative materials, using them in his own editions in the 1530s. After a musical hiatus of seven years, he adopted the single-impression method, devised by Attaingnant, for his edition of Morales’s masses in ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(b Rouen; d Geneva, 1556–7). French music printer. A Simon Du Bosc, possibly identifiable with the music printer, though called a Parisian, first printed at Alençon between 1529 and 1534. He seems to have been in Paris before that time and was also there in 1534; at the end of that year he was listed as a heretic. Guillaume Simon Du Bosc appears in Geneva, where a heretic would reasonably have gone, in 1553; in that year or the next he was joined by Guillaume Guéroult, a relative, in partnership. Between that year and 1556, when Guéroult appears to have left for Lyons, they printed at least 12 volumes of music, some of which are lost; they include collections of motets by Clemens non Papa, Crecquillon, Gombert, Goudimel, Sermisy and others, and a book of psalm settings. It has been suggested that Du Bosc was the printer, while Guéroult acted as the financial partner and, probably, music editor. Du Bosc also printed on his own account, including three volumes of motets (one by Clemens non Papa)....