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Article

Abume  

Bullroarer of the Tiv people of Nigeria; it is used in the agbande rite for a pregnant woman, with the ivuur scraper and the imborivungu pipe.

See also Imborivungu ; Ivuur .

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Large box-resonated lamellaphone of Ghana; it has three to five metal tongues.

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Atuamba  

K.A. Gourlay and F.J. de Hen

Bullroarer of the Kuma of the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It consists of a slightly concave ellipsoidal piece of wood measuring 30 × 10 cm along the axes. The instrument is whirled by a cord attached to one end and the sound produced is said to resemble the growling of a leopard. The bullroarer has associations with spirit voices and secret ceremonies such as circumcision, and has restrictions against women and non-initiates seeing it, as is customary for other bullroarers of the Congo. The varied names collected by de Hen suggest an onomatopoeic derivation, for example, the Adoi, Amanga, Andebogo and Andowi ...

Article

Bailol  

Jeremy Montagu

Mouth bow of the Fula and Tukulor peoples of Senegal and the Gambia. The left hand presses the string with a small stick to alter the pitch of the fundamental, while the right hand taps the string with a second stick. Overtones are selected by altering the shape of the mouth....

Article

Baka  

Mouth bow of the Gbande people of Liberia. The player taps the string with a stick in his right hand while regulating the vibrating length with a stick in his left. The string passes between his lips; by altering the shape of the oral cavity he can produce different overtones. ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Mabadi and Bandia peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has five to 12 wooden tongues and a trough-shaped bark resonator. Similar instruments are the Mangbele marombe, Mbuja ekwongolia, and Zande modeku.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

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Bandiri  

Set of two or more single-headed frame drums, with or without circular metal jingles, and a kettledrum used by members of the k’adiriyya Islamic sect of northern Nigeria. It accompanies the zikiri (creed formula by which a person acknowledges that he is a Muslim). The frame drum is held in the left hand and beaten with the fingers of the right....

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Trough xylophone of the Ngbaka people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has 10 to 12 bars. Similar instruments are the Bangubangu malimba, Ngbandi gombi, and Mbanja mandjanga.

See Manza .

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Bangali  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown ivory horn of the Barambo people in the Uele region, the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a rectangular embouchure and a fingerhole in the tip.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 178.

Article

Bangia  

Lyre of the Berta people of southeastern Sudan. It has a wooden bowl resonator, a soundtable of hide into which two soundholes are cut, and a small wooden bridge. The five strings, formerly made of gut, are nowadays made of steel. Each string is fastened to a strip of cloth wound around the yoke and can be tuned by twisting the cloth. The ...

Article

Bangwe  

Andrew Tracey

Board zither of southeastern Africa made of a flat board or of a raft of papyrus stalks. Its single wire or fibre string is stretched from end to end through holes in the body of the instrument (normally seven times, but nine to 12 among the Sena, Manganja, and Barwe peoples of central Mozambique). Rough tuning is effected by friction tensioning each segment, fine tuning by moving the small bridges under each string at the player’s end. In northern Mozambique and Malawi the player usually strums all the pentatonically tuned strings with the right index finger while damping with the left fingers those notes that are not required to sound, an ancient technique used on many lyres and zithers. The ...

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Banja  

Pair of concussion sticks played by the Mbuti people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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Bankiya  

Drum of the Mbelo and Kongo peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et due Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1951), 61.

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Banzie  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Zither of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The name banzie is used by the Zande people, banzu by the Mangbetu and Bwa. It has a box resonator of bark and 9 to 13 liana strings.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Bappe  

Five-string plucked half-spiked lute of Senegal and Gambia. It has a boat-shaped soundbox and is similar to the xalam.

See also Xalam .

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Tensioned double-headed hourglass drum of the Bariba people of Benin. It is held under the arm and used with a cylindrical drum to accompany dance music for state occasions. The name bara karanku is presumably cognate with the Hausa kalangu.

See also Kalangu.

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Baranga  

Bullroarer of the Vere people of Nigeria traditionally used in the Do Tibas cult, particularly for rain-making rites.

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Barba  

Single-headed kettledrum of the Dogon people of Mali. Made from an almost spherical calabash, it is beaten with the flat of the hands; it is used with other drums during the sowing festival and at funeral rites.

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Baruma  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Notched flute of the Pygmies of the Epulu region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is end-blown and has three fingerholes.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aerophones de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1974), 279–80.

Article

Basoko  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Large cylindrical wooden slit drum of the Bango people of the north-central Democratic Republic of the Congo.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 57.