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Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz and Joseph Vella Bondin

(Matteo)

(b Valetta, Nov 16, 1715; d Naples, Oct 1760). Maltese composer and teacher. His grandfather, who was French, settled in Malta in 1661. Abos's cousin Carol Farrugia paid for him to go to Naples as a child and receive his musical training at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù. An entry in the 1729 account book of the institution lists a payment to a ‘Maltese maggiore’ for copying a ‘new work by Sig Francesco Durante, Dixit’. Abos's principal teachers at the conservatory would have been first Gaetano Greco, then Durante and Gerolimo Ferrara (not Leonardo Leo). His first opera for Naples was Le due zingare simili, an opera buffa staged at the Teatro Nuovo in 1742. In the same year he took teaching posts at two Neapolitan conservatories: the Poveri di Gesù Cristi, where he succeeded Alfonso Caggi as secondo maestro and assisted Francesco Feo until the institution was dissolved in ...

Article

Gloria Eive

(b Faenza, bap. Dec 31, 1716; d Faenza, Oct 12, 1785). Italian violinist, composer and teacher. He studied with Tartini, probably between 1730 or 1731 and 1733, by which date his name appears in the list of musicians at Faenza Cathedral, as third (and last) violinist under the direction of his brother, Don Francesco Alberghi, maestro di cappella. In 1742 he was referred to in Faenza chronicles as ‘Paolo Alberghi, Professore’, and both his virtuosity and his compositions – sonatas and violin concertos – were extravagantly praised. In 1753 he became first violinist and, on his brother’s death in 1760, maestro di cappella as well; he retained both positions until his death. Alberghi supplemented his small salary from the cathedral by playing for civic festivities and for the two academies of Faenza, and by composing and teaching; among his pupils were Bernardo Campagnoli, Antonio Bisoni, Cristoforo Babbi and possibly Giuseppe Sarti (unconfirmed). A portrait of Alberghi in the Biblioteca Comunale of Faenza (which, together with the Archivio Capitolare del Duomo, contains much biographical material in manuscript) indicates that he was blind in one eye....

Article

Peter Ross

[Hans Kaspar]

(b Zürich, Dec 26, 1695; d Zürich, June 23, 1755). Swiss composer and music pedagogue. The year of his birth has been given incorrectly in some sources as 1697. His father Joseph, originally a tailor and from 1692 a schoolteacher, planned a theological training for Johann Caspar, who was his second son. After study at the cathedral school, the Collegium Humanitatis, and (from 1715) the theology class, Bachofen gained the title V.D.M. (verbi divini minister) in 1720. In 1711 he joined the collegium musicum at the chapter house, and in 1715 he became a member of one that met at the German School. In 1720 he became a singing teacher at the lower grammar school. His small income compelled him to seek a secondary source of income, from trading in violin strings. Despite disputes with officials and colleagues, he was appointed, after J.K. Albertin’s death in ...

Article

Mary Cyr

[not Jean-Baptiste]

(b Lunel, 1710; d Paris, Dec 1, 1772). French haute-contre singer, music teacher, cellist and composer. His début in 1733 at the Paris Opéra, according to La Borde, was in the monologue of Pélée, ‘Ciel! en voyant ce temple redoutable’ from Act 3 of Collasse's Thétis et Pélée (1689). He soon joined the Italian troupe, performing in divertissements between the acts of operas. After three years he returned to the Opéra and took several minor roles between 1737 and 1745 in Rameau's works: Un Athlète in Castor et Pollux (1737), Un Songe in Dardanus (1739), Lycurgue in Fêtes d'Hébé (1739), and Tacmas (replacing the well-known haute-contre Tribou) in the third entrée of Les Indes galantes (1743 revival). In 1743 he sang the title role in the première of Boismortier's ballet-comique, Don Quichotte chez la Duchesse, with the famous soprano Marie Fel as Altisidore. Two years later he retired from the opera to devote himself to teaching and playing the cello. He became first cellist of the orchestra at the Comédie-Italienne in ...

Article

Jean-Paul Montagnier

(b Mantes-la-Jolie, 5/June 6, 1665; d Paris, July 6, 1734). French composer, harpsichordist, theorist and teacher. He probably learnt music in the maîtrise of the collegiate church of Notre Dame, Mantes, and in that of Evreux Cathedral. According to the Etat actuel de la Musique du Roi (1773) he then studied with Caldara in Rome. In 1692 Bernier was living in the rue Tiquetonne in Paris and was teaching the harpsichord. On 20 November 1693 he failed to win the post of maître de musique at Rouen Cathedral in competition with Jean-François Lalouette. He was appointed head of the maîtrise of Chartres Cathedral on 17 September 1694 and remained there until 18 March 1698, when he obtained a similar position at St Germain-l'Auxerrois, Paris. A Te Deum performed before the king at Fontainebleau on 24 October 1700 was very successful, and was sung again in several Parisian churches in ...

Article

Michael Talbot

(b Bologna, April 8, 1666; d Bologna, March 30, 1747). Italian composer and pedagogue. Having received his initial musical training in Bologna, he was employed as a singer in Rome between 1687 and 1690, attached to the choirs of S Luigi dei Francesi and S Agostino. Returning to Bologna, he was appointed singing master at the Scuole Pie in 1693; later he also instructed the seminarists. In 1698 his Regole facilissime per apprendere con facilità e prestezza li canti fermo e figurato were published anonymously. On 22 March 1703 he was admitted to the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. He joined the choir of S Petronio as a bass in January 1705, holding this post until his death.

Bertalotti's authorship of the Regole facilissime was confirmed in 1706 by a revised edition under the title Regole utilissime per apprendere con fondamento e facilità il canto fermo (Bologna, 1706, 3/...

Article

Robert Fajon

(b Lyons, c1683; d Paris, March 2, 1760). French composer, teacher and opera singer. The main source of information about him is the Parfaict brothers’ Dictionnaire des théâtres, which states that Bouvard entered the Opéra at a very young age to sing soprano parts, with a ‘voice of such a range that its like had never been heard’. After his voice broke, when he was about 16, he spent a couple of years in Rome. He was back in Paris by February 1701, where his first (Italian) air appeared in a collection published by Ballard. In 1702, thanks to the patronage of M. de Francine, the Académie Royale de Musique performed his first opera, Médus, with great success, but in 1706 Cassandre, composed in collaboration with Bertin de La Doué, was a failure. Throughout the years 1701–11 Bouvard regularly published airs in Ballard’s collections, initially airs sérieux...

Article

James L. Jackman

revised by Paologiovanni Maione

(b Naples, 1692; d Naples, Jan 19, 1740). Italian composer and teacher. He was the son of Vito Cesare and Antonia Ricca Caballone. He studied with Veneziano and Perugino at the Neapolitan Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto. In 1716 he married Teresa Muscettola whose sister Antonia was married to the violinist Francesco Barbella and was the mother of the violin virtuoso Emanuele Barbella; according to Burney, the famous violinist first learnt counterpoint from Caballone. The only one of Caballone's sons to follow him as a musician was Gaspare, who later spelt his name ‘Gabellone’. Michele's life and works are sometimes confused with those of his son; in addition some sources mistakenly claim that he was the teacher of Faustina Bordoni Hasse, who in fact studied with Michelangelo Gasparini.

Caballone is not known to have held any regular teaching position, and he died in poverty. Towards the end of his life he became a novice in the confraternity of the Congregazione dei Musici in Naples, and at his death the brothers there voted to bear the expenses of his funeral and burial. These were on the scale due to a full member, presumably a mark of the professional regard in which he was held....

Article

Giuseppe Vecchi

(b Bologna, Oct 19, 1690; d Bologna, July 7, 1774). Italian composer and teacher. A priest at S Petronio, he studied first plainsong and cantus figuralis and then, under Floriano Arresti, counterpoint. In 1717 he was received into the Accademia Filarmonica as a singer and in 1719 as a composer, serving six times as principe and holding other important offices. In 1740 he was named deputy maestro di cappella to G.A. Perti at S Petronio and in 1756, when Perti died, succeeded him, holding the post until his death. He was a highly regarded teacher and had many pupils. Carretti composed much sacred music in both the strict and concertante styles, publishing a Credo corali, for one and two voices and optional organ (Bologna, 1737), and some sacre canzoni in the anthology La ricreazione spirituale (Bologna, 1730). The largest collection of his manuscript works is at S Petronio (others are in ...

Article

David Fuller

revised by Bruce Gustafson

(b Rouen, April 10, 1707; d Paris, Jan 21, 1795). French organist, teacher, composer-arranger and author of methods on performing practice; son of Gaspard Corrette. Though little is known of his life, his works, which span nearly 75 years, provide an extraordinarily broad view of ordinary light music in France during the 18th century, and his methods are a rich source of information about performing practice and music of the period. He was married on 8 January 1733 to Marie-Catherine Morize. They had a daughter Marie-Anne (1734–c1822) and a son Pierre-Michel (1744–1801), who became an organist.

Corrette first established his reputation by becoming musical director of the Foire St Germain and the Foire St Laurent, where he arranged and composed vaudevilles and divertissements for the opéras comiques (1732–9). From 1737 until its closure in 1790 he was organist at Ste Marie within the temple of the ...

Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz

(b Villa Santa Maria, Chieti, ?1709; d Naples, July 29, 1785). Italian composer and teacher. He was the brother of Michaele Cotumacci (b c1682), composer of a cantata for four voices and violins, Progressi vittoriosi della Fede Cattolica ottenuti della predicazione di S Francesco di Sales ( I-Nf ); Carlo’s son, Matteo Cotumacci (1739–1804), was also a musician. Carlo Cotumacci, according to Burney, who visited him in 1770, was a pupil of Alessandro Scarlatti ‘in the year 1719’. He began his career as an organist serving various Neapolitan churches, for which he also composed. His earliest known dated work is a Missa di Requiem for two voices and organ (20 October 1727). In 1737 he became a member of the Neapolitan Congregazione dei Musici and in 1749 organist of the Casa dell’Annunziata. On 1 December 1755, after the death of Francesco Durante, he and Joseph Doll joined Girolamo Abos as ...

Article

Catherine Gas-Ghidina

(b Beauce, c1680; d c1760). French composer and music teacher. David studied music and composition with Nicolas Bernier between 1694 and 1698. From 1701 to 1706, he was chief of music for Philip V of Spain, and moved to Lyon in 1710, where he earned an excellent reputation. He also served as “maître de musique” for the Prince of Monaco (1715–17), and was director at the Académie des Beaux-Arts at Lyon (1717–26). In this city he wrote most of his works, directed the music for ordinary events and visits by dignitaries, and instituted in 1737 the Concert Spirituel. The same year, David wrote Méthode Nouvelle […], a tutor for music and singing that is unique evidence of his work as a composer and music director still known in 1760. David evolved as a musician in the cosmopolitan cities of Paris and Lyon, mixing with the cities’ illustrious musicians and befriending Jean-Jacques Rousseau, even advising the latter on his first opera ...

Article

Mary Cyr

(fl 1735–55). French composer, viol player and teacher (‘maître de viole’). He worked in Paris. Throughout his Pièces de viole op.2, dedicated to the Prince of Carignan, Dollé used the signs for vibrato and ornaments adopted by Marin Marais, and the second of his three suites includes a tombeau for Marais le père, a rondeau whose chordal style, use of the high register and vibrato (called ‘plainte’) recall the expressive playing of the late master of the viol. The Pièces op.3 contains 25 character pieces for six-string pardessus de viole, which are divided into three levels of difficulty. The titles of two pieces, La Roland and La Morel, suggest his acquaintance with the viol players Roland Marais and Jacques Morel. The sonatas in op.4, though consciously italianate in melodic style, with frequent sequences, syncopations and wide leaps, still reflect the French taste in expression and ornamentation. Op.4 includes five ...

Article

David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(fl 1741–57). French composer and teacher of the harpsichord and hurdy-gurdy. He advertised himself as a student of (André) Campra and ‘other great masters’ in the Mercure (February 1753). His works are substantial in both quantity and quality, and merit something better than the total obscurity into which they have fallen, even though many are written for so unsatisfactory an instrument as the hurdy-gurdy.

In 1753 Dupuits opened a public school of music which by 1757 had expanded to include all instruments, and where ‘lessons in the various styles are given every day except Sundays and holidays, and three times a week concerts for learning ensemble and keeping in time’. At some time, probably in the 1740s, he was employed by the Duke of Cambray. He was either very friendly with the engraver Jean Robert or was willing to spend considerable sums on the appearance of his publications, for nearly all have handsome pictorial title-pages by that artist. The collection of songs ...

Article

Walter Blankenburg

revised by Dorothea Schröder

(b Schweinfurt, Nov 2, 1674; d Schweinfurt, Nov 22, 1751). German organist, composer and teacher. He was the son of a town musician and attended the Lateinschule and Gymnasium at Schweinfurt. In 1693 he went to Leipzig, where he studied theology and took part in musical performances directed by Kuhnau and N.A. Strungk. After taking the master’s degree, Englert was called back to his native town in 1697 to succeed Georg Christoph Bach as Kantor at St Johannis. He also worked as Präceptor at the Gymnasium, where he was appointed Konrektor in 1717 and Rektor in 1729. The demands of teaching may have induced him to exchange, in 1713, his Kantorat for the organist’s post at St Johannis, which he held until his death.

According to Mattheson, Englert wrote several cantata cycles and a great number of other works, mostly sacred. Stylistically his music was indebted to Kuhnau’s, as Schmidt observed in his description of 21 cantatas (then in ...

Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz

(b Naples, 1691; d Naples, Jan 28, 1761). Italian composer and teacher. According to Burney, he was ‘one of the greatest Neapolitan masters of his time’.

Feo received his musical training at the Conservatorio di S Maria della Pietà dei Turchini at Naples, which he entered on 3 September 1704; among his fellow students were Leonardo Leo and Giuseppe de Majo, who later married Feo’s niece, Teresa Manna. He first studied with the secondo maestro, Andrea Basso, and after 1705 also with Nicola Fago, the then newly appointed primo maestro. According to some 19th-century sources, Feo is said to have left the conservatory about 1708 to study counterpoint with G.O. Pitoni in Rome. This claim has not been substantiated, and it is now believed that he remained at the Turchini until 1712.

On 18 January 1713 he presented to the Neapolitan public his first opera, L’amor tirannico, ossia Zenobia...

Article

Hanns-Bertold Dietz

[Pietrantonio]

(b ?1695–1700; d Naples, Aug 15, 1777). Italian composer and teacher. On 25 April 1742 he succeeded Giovanni Veneziano as secondo maestro of the Neapolitan Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto. After the death of the primo maestro, Francesco Durante (30 September 1755), he shared the musical direction with Gennaro Manna, maestro di cappella of Naples Cathedral, and after 10 April 1760 also with the aging Nicolò Porpora. But Porpora and Manna resigned after one year, and on 15 May 1761 Gallo became sole director. Among the students trained there during his 35 years as a master of the conservatory were Pasquale Anfossi, P.A. Guglielmi, Antonio Sacchini, Fedele Fenaroli, Giuseppe Giordani, Domenico Cimarosa and Niccolò Zingarelli. Although Gallo served S Maria di Loreto longer than any master before, he was the least remembered. At first he was overshadowed by Durante, later by his own student and successor, Fenaroli....

Article

Watkins Shaw

revised by Donald Burrows

(b The Hague, April 23, 1686; d North Aston, Oxon, Nov 15, 1773). English bass, teacher and composer. His father, also named Bernard, came to England in 1688 and became Page of the Back Stairs to William III. He was a chorister at the Chapel Royal from 1697 to 1705, and thus one of Blow’s latest pupils. He was appointed a Gentleman of the Chapel in 1708, and received a second place there in 1734. In 1727 he succeeded Croft as Master of the Children and as Tuner of the Regals and Organs. In 1711 he became in addition a lay vicar of Westminster Abbey, and from 1740 he was also Master of the Choristers there. For a brief period in 1714 he was also a lay clerk at St George’s Chapel, Windsor. He retired from active duties in 1757, though nominally remaining a member of the Chapel Royal and Westminster Abbey choirs. He spent his later years at North Aston, near Oxford, where a memorial tablet to him was erected by his pupil T.S. Dupuis. He was buried at Westminster Abbey....

Article

Michelle Fillion

[Giannotti, Pierre]

(b Lucca, early 18th century; d Paris, June 19, 1765). Italian composer, teacher and double bass player. His first set of violin sonatas appeared in Paris in 1728. In March 1739 he was engaged as a double bass player at the Paris Opéra, a position he held until his retirement in 1758; his name also appears in a 1751 list of the members of the Concert Spirituel orchestra. His numerous compositions suggest that he may also have played the violin. One of his two-violin sonatas was performed at the Concert Spirituel in 1749, the only time he was so honoured. Yet he must have enjoyed some success, for his sonatas opp.2 and 5 remained in the catalogues of the music publisher Bailleux for eight years after his death. He also edited the collections of 12 Sinfonie opp.1 and 2 (Paris, n.d.) by Alberto Gallo, and of Sinfonie … dei più celebri autori d'Italia...

Article

Milton Sutter

revised by Michelangelo Gabbrielli

(b Cremona, Oct 24, 1685; d Cremona, 1745). Italian composer, organist and teacher. He studied music with T.B. Gaffi and after his ordination as a priest he was appointed organist of Cremona Cathedral on 14 December 1708. He later became maestro di cappella there and held the post until 27 April 1727. In 1712 he travelled to Lodi for the celebration of the feast of St Teresa, and to Piacenza for the canonization of St Andrea Avellino. On 30 May 1737 he directed some of his own music in the Chiesa delle Grazie, Lodi, and on 29 November 1740 music by him was performed in Cremona Cathedral for the funerary service of Emperor Karl VI. At the beginning of the same year Padre Martini had undertaken to obtain for Gonelli the post of maestro di cappella at Loreto, but Gonelli refused the post. In 1743, together with Leo, Porpora, Jommelli and Martini, he was one of the judges for the post of ...