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Article

David L. Crouse

revised by David W. Music

(b Tennessee, Oct 13, 1792; d Franklin, TN, Oct 18, 1859). American singing-school teacher and tunebook compiler. Nothing is known of his early activities or training, but by 1817 Carden was an established singing-school teacher in the Tennessee area. He taught a singing school in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1820, but probably returned to Tennessee shortly thereafter. In September 1822, Carden advertised a singing school in Nashville; he apparently continued to live in the Nashville area until 1850, when he moved to Williamson County (probably Franklin). His first tunebook, The Missouri Harmony, “published by the compiler” in St. Louis but printed in Cincinnati (1820, 2/1850/R 1975, 1994; modern revision, 2005), was the most popular fasola shape-note tunebook of the South and West until the Civil War, achieving at least 24 editions and reprints through 1857; however, Carden seems to have given up his interest in the book after the first edition, and subsequent issues were apparently the work of the Cincinnati printers. Carden procured shape-note music type and published two more tunebooks himself: ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Lille, June 8, 1731; d Brussels, July 30, 1804). French bookseller, printer and type founder, active in the southern Netherlands. Born into a family of printers, he was the son of Henri de Boubers and Marie Catherine Gavroy. He married Marie-Thérèse Joseph Panckoucke, a sister of the French bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke, and later married Marie-Thérèse Joseph d'Audenarde. A bookseller in Dunkirk by about 1747, then a printer-bookseller in Liège from 1761, he established himself in Brussels in 1768 after two years of apprenticeship with Jean-Joseph Boucherie. On 18 October 1769 he opened the first permanent bookshop in the Théâtre de la Monnaie selling librettos of lyric works, some with music. De Boubers was also a type founder, at first in partnership with Mathias Rosart, son of the printer Jacques-François Rosart. He produced new printing type in 1779 which he sold to numerous printers in the Netherlands as well as to individuals, including the Prince de Ligne. De Boubers edited some occasional pieces, two of which were published for the inauguration of Charles de Lorraine's statue in Brussels in ...

Article

Peter Ward Jones

[Henry]

(b Lövånger, Swedish Lapland, 1720; d ?Stockholm, 1782). Swedish printer and publisheractive in London. After studies at Uppsala University and some years of clerical work he became a general book printer. About 1760 he developed his own version of Breitkopf’s improvements in printing music from movable type, using a system of 166 characters. He applied for a patent in 1763, and in the following year was granted a privilege for music printing in Sweden for 25 years. Lacking economic support, however, he left Sweden in 1767 and in November of that year arrived in London, where he began to issue music in his new type. After submitting his first work, an edition of Uttini’s Six Sonatas op.1, to the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, he obtained a resolution from that body that his method of printing was superior and much cheaper than any that had been in use in Great Britain; he later printed this resolution as a preface to his edition of Sarti’s Three Sonatas....

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Saint Samson, 1740; d Brussels, Dec 24, 1806). French bookseller, publisher and agent, active in Brussels. First a seller of engravings, he became one of the principal music sellers in Brussels from 1774. He published the works of Honauer, Pauwels and G. Ferrari, and made a request to the Milan engraver C.G. Barbieri to publish the works of C.-L.-J. André. Godefroy was also the Brussels agent for numerous Parisian publishers, his name appearing on the title-page of publications by La Chevardière (for the works of Anfossi and Paisiello), Sieber (Cramer, Haydn, Kammel), Durieu (Dalayrac), Heina (Eichner, J.A. Lorenziti, Vanhal), Mmes Le Menu and Boyer (J.H. Schröter), J.-P. Deroullède (B. Lorenziti, Pieltain, Anton Stamitz), Mondhare (Staes), Bailleux (Chevalier de Saint-Georges) and Camand (Jean Cremont). Being the Brussels agent for Heina, Godefroy was the first to distribute the music of Mozart in Brussels with a Parisian edition of the op.4 piano sonatas....

Article

Roland Würtz

(bap. Mannheim, Feb 7, 1740; d Worms, Feb 15, 1810). German music publisher. By his own account he founded a firm of music engravers in Mannheim in 1768, but documentary evidence of his publications exists only from 1773. He soon incorporated a music shop into his publishing enterprise, buying new publications for it on his travels, especially in Paris; the publisher’s catalogue he printed for the Frankfurt book fair includes works by Gossec, Rigel, Hüllmandel and Boccherini. On 23 August 1776 Elector Carl Theodor granted his application for an exclusive patent for 20 years within the Palatinate, which was extended to include Bavaria in 1782. In view of the rapid rise of Götz’s publishing business, Mozart’s comment that he could not get his piano and violin sonatas printed in Mannheim (28 February 1778) is surprising. Eschstruth praised Götz’s prospectus (Musicalische Bibliothek, i, 1784), and he was soon able to open branches in Munich and Düsseldorf. His business began to suffer during the war which began in ...

Article

François Lesure

(b Mieschitz [now Měšic], nr Prague, Nov 20, 1729; d Paris, Feb 28, 1790). Czech musician and publisher. He was in Paris from 1764, as cor de chasse to the Prince de Conti and later trompette de chevau-léger de la garde du roy, but received his discharge in 1775. From that date he was a teacher of the trumpet and hunting horn; from 1785 until his death he was a member of the orchestra of the Comédie Française.

In January 1773 he petitioned for a six-year privilege for the publication of Stamitz’s instrumental music. For at least ten years (1775–85), he published instrumental works, especially chamber music, by fellow Czechs (Vanhal, Fiala and Stamitz) and composers of the Mannheim school (Eichner and Schwindl). Heina was a good friend to Mozart in Paris, particularly at the time of his mother’s illness and death. He also published the first editions of seven of Mozart’s works, including three piano sonatas....

Article

Alexander Weinmann

(b Rothenburg am Neckar, May 12, 1754; d Vienna, Feb 9, 1812). Austrian music publisher and composer. He went to Vienna in 1768 to study law, but after qualifying, devoted his time to music, especially publishing and composing. As early as 1783, when Viennese music publishing was still in its infancy, he began to publish two series of symphonies in Lyons (printed by Guéra), and some quartets and duets for flute. On 24 January 1784 he announced in the Wiener Zeitung that he planned to publish all his musical works at his own expense and under his own supervision from Rudolf Gräffer’s bookshop. But in a large advertisement on 6 August 1785 he no longer mentioned Gräffer, having established a firm in his own name at his home. This advertisement gives a list of works which had already appeared as well as a new publishing programme of three different series, including orchestral and chamber music by Haydn, Mozart, Vanhal, Albrechtsberger, Pleyel, Miča, Ordonez and other foreign composers, besides Hoffmeister’s own works. Although he did not maintain his announced schedules, the business evidently flourished. Hoffmeister had connections with the Speyer publisher Bossler, whose firm acted as a kind of agent for Hoffmeister. Hence a series of announcements and some detailed reviews of works published by the Hoffmeister firm appeared in Bossler’s ...

Article

Lasairíona Duignan

revised by Barra R. Boydell

(d Dublin, 1813). Irish composer, music publisher and instrument maker. George Petrie considered him to have been the ‘most eminent British composer of military music in his time’. A Collection of Quick and Slow Marches, Troops &c. can be dated 1795–8. A square piano dated 1796 bears Holden’s name (possibly as seller rather than maker). In 1805, described as a ‘military music master and instrument maker’, he had premises in Arran Quay, Dublin. Nothing further is known about Holden’s apparent activities as an instrument maker. In 1806 he moved to Parliament Street, where he opened a music shop and began publishing, largely his own music although this continued to be issued by other Dublin publishers. On his death the business was continued by his widow until about 1818. Holden's publications included A Collection of Old Established Irish Slow and Quick Tunes (c1807); many of the airs may have been collected by his son Francis Holden. The elder Holden published two more collections of Irish music (issued periodically), collections of Welsh tunes, masonic songs and country dances, numbers of marches and quick steps, often dedicated to specific regiments and corps, and many individual songs and other instrumental pieces....

Article

Alexander Weinmann

[Huberti, Antoine]

(b c1722; d Jan 13, 1791). Engraver and music publisher of Flemish descent. He worked in Paris from 1756 as a musician at the Opéra and performer on the viola d’amore, but became most prominent for his activities as an engraver and music publisher. He appears to have published works by Wagenseil in 1756 but the earliest privilege for publishing music is dated 2 April 1757. From February 1770 he made his publications available in Vienna as well, and is credited with introducing engraving to Viennese music publishing. It was probably the bookseller Hermann Josef Krüchten who persuaded him to move to Vienna, where at that time copper engraving had been little practised; Huberty and his family moved there at the beginning of 1777 and opened a music engraving and printing business in the Alstergasse, ‘Zum goldenen Hirschen’. A detailed advertisement in the Wiener Diarium (11 April 1778...

Article

Rita Benton

(b Paris, March 9, 1753; d Paris, April 15, 1832). French violinist and music publisher. As a boy he studied with Pierre Gaviniès; at the age of 17 he made his début in a concerto in which he showed great promise, according to the Mercure de France of 1 April 1770. A performance 11 years later elicited only mild enthusiasm, and the soloist’s ‘noticeable shyness’ was commented on (Mercure de France, April 1781). His later musical activity was for the most part confined to teaching and to participation in the orchestras of various societies (including the Concert Spirituel, the Concert d’Emulation, the Société Académique des Enfants d’Appollon, the Concert Olympique and, in 1810, the imperial chapel), although in these he sometimes performed as leader, and occasionally as soloist.

The music publishing house that Imbault founded operated during its first year in connection with the already established firm of Jean-Georges Sieber (their first joint announcement, in the ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and David Johnson

(b Ettrick Valley, c1750; d Edinburgh, Feb 26, 1811). Scottish music engraver. He was a leading Edinburgh engraver, who from 1772 to 1790 prepared plates for well over half the music issued in Scotland. The son of Charles Johnson, he was probably apprenticed with James Reed, an early Edinburgh music engraver. Johnson's first known work is Domenico Corri's Six Canzones for Two Voices (1772); then followed A Collection of Favourite Scots Tunes … by the Late Mr Chs McLean and other Eminent Masters (c1772) and Daniel Dow's Twenty Minuets (1773). These were cut in copper, but his later work is all stamped on pewter, a practice which his Scots Magazine obituary notice erroneously credits him with having invented.

Johnson worked mostly for other Scottish publishers, but he is remembered for the songbook The Scots Musical Museum, which he published himself in six volumes (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(fl 1740–62). English music publisher, printer, music seller and possibly violin maker. He began his business in London by 1740, and probably acquired part of those of Daniel Wright and Benjamin Cooke, some of whose publications he reissued from the original plates. Around the mid-18th century the predominance of the Walsh engraving and publishing business began to wane, and Johnson was responsible for publishing some of the best music of the day, including works by Arne, Felton, Geminiani, Nares, Domenico Scarlatti and Stanley, as well as annual volumes and large collections of country dances. Unusually, many of Johnson's editions bore dates; their technical quality was high, some being engraved by John Phillips. A number of fair-quality violins bear the Johnson label, most probably made for rather than actually by him.

Johnson appears to have died about 1762, and from that time to 1777 most of the imprints bear the name of ‘Mrs. Johnson’ or ‘R. Johnson’, presumably his widow. The old imprint ‘John Johnson’ occasionally appears in these years, and may refer to her late husband or to another relative. Johnson's sign from ...

Article

(b Volx, Feb 1730; d Verrières-le-Buisson, April 8, 1812). French music publisher. Advertisements for musical works in various periodicals in October 1758 mark the start of his activities as a music publisher. He took over the business which Jean-Pantaléon Le Clerc had passed on to his daughter Mme Vernadé. By December 1758 La Chevardière referred to himself as the ‘successeur de M. Le Clerc’. Huberty seems to have been briefly associated with him in 1759 for both their names appear on the title-page of Philidor’s Blaise le savetier (‘Paris, de La Chevardière et Huberti, successeurs de M. Leclerc’). Thereafter La Chevardière worked alone until 1780. On 5 February he handed over the management of the shop to his daughter Elisabeth-Eléonore and his son-in-law Jean-Pierre Deroullède for three years; he finally sold the business to Pierre Leduc on 1 December 1784. He then retired to Verrières, where he became mayor of the municipality....

Article

Cliff Eisen

(b ?1737/8; d Vienna, Nov 23, 1794). Austrian music copyist and publisher. He apparently began his commercial music copying business in Vienna on 27 March 1782; by 13 August 1783, when he moved his premises to the Kärntnerstrasse, he was calling himself a music publisher (though the business at that time handled only the retail sale of printed and manuscript music). A few publications from his firm appeared between 1797 and 1801, possibly including the first printed edition of Haydn’s Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser. Lausch dealt primarily, though not exclusively, in vocal music: on 1 July 1786 he advertised parts for Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro; a similar set for Don Giovanni was announced on 24 May 1788. The German war-song k539, written on 5 March 1788, was available from Lausch as early as 19 March in parts and vocal score.

Although several copies from his shop are signed, it is impossible to identify any one hand as Lausch’s; almost certainly he had several employees, some of whom may have been temporarily subcontracted. By the same token, there is no guarantee that the copies offered by him – including the parts to ...

Article

Brian Boydell

(b ?Dublin; d Dublin, Feb 21, 1776). Irish publisher, music seller and violinist. He was one of the most prominent and active musicians in Dublin during the 1750s and 60s. In 1745 he was admitted to the City Music, of which he was appointed bandmaster in 1752 at a salary of £40, increased to £60 in 1753. During this period he was appearing regularly as principal violinist at the summer open-air concerts at Marlborough Green between 1750 and 1756 and as conductor of the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah at the Great Musick Hall in Fishamble Street. In July 1751 he became violinist and musical director in the syndicate which leased Crow Street Musick Hall for the six years before it was taken over, rebuilt and opened as a theatre.

Samuel Lee was founder of the music shop and publishing firm which carried out business at Little Green, off Bolton Street (...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

revised by Nigel Simeone

(b Elberfeld, c1753; d Vienna, Jan 11, 1807). Austrian engraver and music publisher. He opened an art shop in Vienna about 1770 and became known for his topical cheap copperplate engravings; Gräffer aptly named him the ‘iconographic journalist’. Through publishing calendars and almanacs he came into contact with literary and musical circles and acquired a modest position in the Guild of Viennese Music Publishers. In the Wiener Zeitung of 29 September 1787 he announced a cheap music engraving process, which he evidently also used for the musical supplements to almanacs. On 15 March 1788 he published Giuseppe Sarti's three piano sonatas op.4, but until 1799 dealt chiefly in songs and dances from Singspiele and ballets. He was unfortunate in that 12 lieder and odes by Gellert in settings supposedly by Mozart (1800 and 1801) all proved to be forgeries. However, he became Beethoven's first publisher with the edition of ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

( b Nuremberg, c 1776; d Vienna, April 18, 1816). Viennese music publisher . His firm began publishing in 1810, reissuing salable works from Leopold Kozeluch’s Musikalisches Magazin publishing house and the music of such composers as Gelinek, Gyrowetz, Hummel and Vanhal. While the production was for the most part of fashionable pieces and dance music, it also included some minor works by Beethoven. After Maisch’s death the firm continued to trade under his name until January 1818, then for several months under that of his widow. The firm’s accountant Daniel Sprenger (b Sülfeld, nr Hanover, c 1794; d 21 Sept 1819) took control for a further year; after his death Mathias Artaria (1793–1835), son of the Mannheim publisher Domenico Artaria (ii), assisted Sprenger’s widow in carrying on the business. He married her on 4 November 1821 and the firm bore his name alone from 10 June 1822...

Article

Brian Boydell

( b ?Dublin; d Dublin, 1763). Irish music publisher, music seller, instrument dealer and violinist . He worked from about 1738 in the business established by his brother Bartholemew (d July 1758) about a year previously at Corelli’s Head, opposite Anglesea Street in College Green, Dublin. In April 1740 he advertised a proposal for printing Geminiani’s Guida armonica by subscription; it was finally issued in about 1752. Notable publications by him include collections of songs from Arne’s Comus, Dubourg’s variations on the Irish melody ‘Ellen a Roon’ and in December 1752 ‘six Trios for 2 Fiddles and thorough Bass composed by Sieur Van Maldere’. From 1741 a number of publications were issued in conjunction with William Neale, including the Monthly Musical Masque consisting of a collection of contemporary popular songs; the first issue was advertised in January 1744. Manwaring also imported Peter Wamsley’s best violins, Roman fiddle strings and ‘all the newest music published in London’. In addition to his business he took a prominent part in Dublin musical life during the 1740s as a violinist, often appearing with his brother who was also a violinist. He acted as treasurer of various charitable musical societies. After his death his wife carried on the business until ...

Article

Richard Macnutt

(b Bologna, Feb 1, 1745; d Marseilles, 1812). Italian music publisher and composer. About 1770 he began publishing in Venice and, probably in mid-1773, took the violinist and composer Carlo Canobbio (1741–1822) into partnership. Although the enterprise was temporarily abandoned about 1775, the brief period of its duration marked the revival of music publishing in Italy after 70 years of almost total inactivity. In Venice Marescalchi issued some 70 engraved publications, most in oblong format, evenly distributed between vocal pieces (mainly full scores and orchestral parts of single numbers from operas performed in Venice) and instrumental works (ballet, dance, chamber music and opera overtures). Anfossi, Boccherini, Naumann, Paisiello and Marescalchi himself were the composers of more than half of this output. In his Venice publications Marescalchi worked closely with Alessandri & Scattaglia, who were probably responsible for all his music engraving as well as being named on most of the title-pages as his selling agents, at their premises on the Rialto; one title-page also describes them as his printers, and this may have been another of their regular responsibilities. This connection between the two firms has often led cataloguers and bibliographers to ascribe to Alessandri & Scattaglia publications which should properly be regarded as Marescalchi’s, with the result that numerous entries in RISM, the ...

Article

Paul van Reijen

(b Hanover, c1720; d Amsterdam, bur. April 10, 1781). Dutch music publisher and musician of German birth . On 27 August 1765 Markordt became a burgher of Amsterdam. He founded his music shop and publishing house ‘à la Salle d'Estampes au haut de l'Escalier de la Bourse’. In the years 1766 to 1780 Markordt was active both as a double bass player and as a supplier of strings and repairer of instruments in the chapel of the Mozes- en Aäronkerk. After his death the firm was continued by his widow Johanna van Rhee and his son Daniel Jan, after 1785 ‘Sur le Rokkin, vis à vis la Barque de la Haye’. What happened to the firm after the death of his widow (bur. 12 March 1801) is unclear. On 2 January 1808 the firm of J.J. Hummel announced the purchase of Markordt's music business.

The firm of Markordt made an important contribution to music publishing in Amsterdam in the second half of the 18th century. Besides many instrumental works (symphonies, concertos, chamber music) by J.C. Bach, J. -J. Boutmy, Dittersdorf, Esser, Just, F.P. Ricci, Schwindl and others, Markordt published much French operatic music (e.g. more than 30 volumes of ...