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Article

Christopher Larkin

German family firm of wind instrument makers. The business, located in Mainz, was established in 1782 by Franz Ambros Alexander (b Miltenberg, July 22, 1753; d Mainz, Dec 1, 1802), who was described in a Mainz Cathedral report of the same year as a wood-turner and wind instrument maker. Portraits depict Franz Ambros and his son Philipp (1787–1864) with clarinets. After his death, Alexander's business was continued by his widow and two of his sons, Claudius (1783–1816) and Philipp, later joined by a third, Kaspar Anton (1803–72). Under the direction of Philipp and Kaspar Anton the firm became known as Gebrüder Alexander, the name it still bears. Kaspar Anton's two sons Franz Anton (1838–1926) and Georg Philip (i) (1849–97) became the third generation to direct the company. Woodwind instruments, mainly for military use, were the firm's main products until the mid-19th century. By that time, however, band instrumentation had become more brass orientated; after Philipp's death in ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Lille, June 8, 1731; d Brussels, July 30, 1804). French bookseller, printer and type founder, active in the southern Netherlands. Born into a family of printers, he was the son of Henri de Boubers and Marie Catherine Gavroy. He married Marie-Thérèse Joseph Panckoucke, a sister of the French bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke, and later married Marie-Thérèse Joseph d'Audenarde. A bookseller in Dunkirk by about 1747, then a printer-bookseller in Liège from 1761, he established himself in Brussels in 1768 after two years of apprenticeship with Jean-Joseph Boucherie. On 18 October 1769 he opened the first permanent bookshop in the Théâtre de la Monnaie selling librettos of lyric works, some with music. De Boubers was also a type founder, at first in partnership with Mathias Rosart, son of the printer Jacques-François Rosart. He produced new printing type in 1779 which he sold to numerous printers in the Netherlands as well as to individuals, including the Prince de Ligne. De Boubers edited some occasional pieces, two of which were published for the inauguration of Charles de Lorraine's statue in Brussels in ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Saint Samson, 1740; d Brussels, Dec 24, 1806). French bookseller, publisher and agent, active in Brussels. First a seller of engravings, he became one of the principal music sellers in Brussels from 1774. He published the works of Honauer, Pauwels and G. Ferrari, and made a request to the Milan engraver C.G. Barbieri to publish the works of C.-L.-J. André. Godefroy was also the Brussels agent for numerous Parisian publishers, his name appearing on the title-page of publications by La Chevardière (for the works of Anfossi and Paisiello), Sieber (Cramer, Haydn, Kammel), Durieu (Dalayrac), Heina (Eichner, J.A. Lorenziti, Vanhal), Mmes Le Menu and Boyer (J.H. Schröter), J.-P. Deroullède (B. Lorenziti, Pieltain, Anton Stamitz), Mondhare (Staes), Bailleux (Chevalier de Saint-Georges) and Camand (Jean Cremont). Being the Brussels agent for Heina, Godefroy was the first to distribute the music of Mozart in Brussels with a Parisian edition of the op.4 piano sonatas....

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(fl 1740–62). English music publisher, printer, music seller and possibly violin maker. He began his business in London by 1740, and probably acquired part of those of Daniel Wright and Benjamin Cooke, some of whose publications he reissued from the original plates. Around the mid-18th century the predominance of the Walsh engraving and publishing business began to wane, and Johnson was responsible for publishing some of the best music of the day, including works by Arne, Felton, Geminiani, Nares, Domenico Scarlatti and Stanley, as well as annual volumes and large collections of country dances. Unusually, many of Johnson's editions bore dates; their technical quality was high, some being engraved by John Phillips. A number of fair-quality violins bear the Johnson label, most probably made for rather than actually by him.

Johnson appears to have died about 1762, and from that time to 1777 most of the imprints bear the name of ‘Mrs. Johnson’ or ‘R. Johnson’, presumably his widow. The old imprint ‘John Johnson’ occasionally appears in these years, and may refer to her late husband or to another relative. Johnson's sign from ...

Article

Brian Boydell

(b ?Dublin; d Dublin, Feb 21, 1776). Irish publisher, music seller and violinist. He was one of the most prominent and active musicians in Dublin during the 1750s and 60s. In 1745 he was admitted to the City Music, of which he was appointed bandmaster in 1752 at a salary of £40, increased to £60 in 1753. During this period he was appearing regularly as principal violinist at the summer open-air concerts at Marlborough Green between 1750 and 1756 and as conductor of the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah at the Great Musick Hall in Fishamble Street. In July 1751 he became violinist and musical director in the syndicate which leased Crow Street Musick Hall for the six years before it was taken over, rebuilt and opened as a theatre.

Samuel Lee was founder of the music shop and publishing firm which carried out business at Little Green, off Bolton Street (...

Article

Brian Boydell

( b ?Dublin; d Dublin, 1763). Irish music publisher, music seller, instrument dealer and violinist . He worked from about 1738 in the business established by his brother Bartholemew (d July 1758) about a year previously at Corelli’s Head, opposite Anglesea Street in College Green, Dublin. In April 1740 he advertised a proposal for printing Geminiani’s Guida armonica by subscription; it was finally issued in about 1752. Notable publications by him include collections of songs from Arne’s Comus, Dubourg’s variations on the Irish melody ‘Ellen a Roon’ and in December 1752 ‘six Trios for 2 Fiddles and thorough Bass composed by Sieur Van Maldere’. From 1741 a number of publications were issued in conjunction with William Neale, including the Monthly Musical Masque consisting of a collection of contemporary popular songs; the first issue was advertised in January 1744. Manwaring also imported Peter Wamsley’s best violins, Roman fiddle strings and ‘all the newest music published in London’. In addition to his business he took a prominent part in Dublin musical life during the 1740s as a violinist, often appearing with his brother who was also a violinist. He acted as treasurer of various charitable musical societies. After his death his wife carried on the business until ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b London, c1728; d London, ?Jan 1776). English music seller and publisher, brother of John Randall. He was a son or more probably a grandson of Peter Randall, a London music publisher associated with John Walsh, and was presumably the Randall found among the Children of the Chapel Royal from 1736 to 1745. At the death of his cousin John Walsh in 1766, he and John Abell inherited the extensive Walsh business, where they had doubtless been employed. They published for the first time the complete full scores of a number of Handel oratorios, starting with Messiah (1767). After Abell's death on 29 July 1768, Randall remained in business alone. Besides reprinting Walsh publications, sometimes with the original imprint in addition to his own, he published many interesting works, including a reissue in 1771 of Morley's A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Collections of country dances and pleasure-garden songs also came from his press. At his death, his widow Elizabeth carried on the business until ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(fl 1737–c1782). English engraver, print-seller and publisher in London. From 1737 until about 1762 he kept a music and print shop in Holborn from which he issued several notable books of songs with pictorial embellishments heading each piece. The earliest, the two-volume Calliope, or English Harmony, was issued from 1737 by and for the engraver in periodical numbers of eight octavo pages each at sixpence per number. The first volume of 25 numbers was completed in 1739; the parts of the second volume began to appear in the same year, though it was probably not finished until about 1746. John Simpson brought out second issues of volume one in 1740 and of volume two in 1747. Late in 1741 Roberts and John Johnson (successor to the Wrights), were accused by Thomas Arne of violating his copyright by printing some of his songs in the second volume of ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

(b Switzerland, c1715; d Vienna, Jan 4, 1798). Swiss music publisher and art dealer. He established his business in Vienna in the early 1770s, and on 5 April 1775 advertised the arrival of new copper engravings in the Wiener Zeitung. His first dealings in music consisted of imports from England, the Netherlands and Paris, his source for Anton Huberty's publications. In 1781 his own first publications appeared. Initially he was a commission agent for Anton Huberty, who had moved to Vienna and eventually became only an engraver for Torricella, gradually handing over many of his pieces; one of the most important was Geminiani's violin tutor, which Torricella published in a splendid new edition on 16 October 1782. The firm flourished in its early days, but increasing competition from Artaria & Co. culminated in a public auction (12 August 1786), at which most of Torricella's plates were obtained by Artaria. He continued to run his art shop until he died, impoverished....

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Brussels, 30 Jan 1731; d Brussels, 2 Aug 1794). Flemish bookseller and printer. He was the son-in-law of the Liège printer Jean-François Bassompierre and was established as a bookseller in Brussels by 5 April 1749. From 1764, Vanden Berghen regularly advertised musical compositions sold in his shop in the Brussels journal Gazette des Pays-Bas. On 11 September 1769 he took over the privilege to print librettos for the Théâtre de La Monnaie from Jean-Joseph Boucherie. Recognized as a printer of the lyric repertoire in Brussels, Vanden Berghen’s editions of librettos, which included musical supplements from 1770 to 1773, were of opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d’ariettes by Baccelli, Dezède, Fridzeri, Grétry, and Martini.

P. Raspé and H. Vanhulst: ‘L’édition musicale’, La musique en Wallonie et à Bruxelles, ed. R. Wangermée and P. Mercier (Brussels, 1980), vol.1, 301–5M. Cornaz: ‘La Monnaie et le commerce des ouvrages lyriques à Bruxelles’, ...