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(b Palestine, TX, Jan 21, 1902; d Fort Worth, May 2, 1984). American singer and bandleader. He led his own band in Dallas (c1925) and toured Texas, then briefly led the Wolverines. In 1928 he worked as a banjoist in New York, but from 1929 he specialized as a singer. He made a large number of recordings as a leader (1929–31, 1934), as well as with such musicians as the Dorsey Brothers (1928–9), Irving Mills, the Goofus Five, and Ben Pollack (all 1929), the California Ramblers, Joe Venuti, and Frankie Trumbauer (all 1929–30), the violinist Ben Selvin (1929–31), Duke Ellington (1930, notably Nine Little Miles from Ten-Ten-Tennessee, Vic. 22586), and Red Nichols and Benny Goodman (both 1931). During the early 1930s his band held many residencies in New York, and Ballew also led an all-star group which included Bunny Berigan and Glenn Miller. Later he appeared in many films....

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[Alexander ]

(b Izatnagar, nr Bareilly, India, Feb 25, 1929; d London, March 15, 1975). Scottish clarinetist and bandleader. The son of a Scottish railway engineer, he returned with his family from India to Edinburgh in the early 1930s. He was self-taught, and from 1946 led his own band in Scotland, playing traditional jazz and swing. In autumn 1954 he moved to London, where he played occasionally with Humphrey Lyttelton, Ken Colyer, and Chris Barber. He formed his own band, which included Al Fairweather, who took over its leadership in 1957; the two men served as co-leaders from autumn 1958 to autumn 1966, when Fairweather joined Acker Bilk and Brown assumed sole leadership. A Fairweather–Brown reunion band performed in 1975. Brown recorded frequently as a leader (1949–73) as well as under the name of his trumpeter Fairweather (1955–6, 1959–62), and with Sammy Price (1969), Brian Lemon (...

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Walter Ojakäär

(Aramovich )

(b Moscow, Aug 15, 1934). Russian alto saxophonist, composer, and bandleader of Armenian descent. Formerly known as Garanyan, he began to spell his surname Garanian at some point in the 1990s. He taught himself to play saxophone and led an amateur octet (1954–7) which later evolved into the youth orchestra of the Art Workers’ Central House in Moscow. For the next eight years he was a principal soloist in and arranger for Oleg Lundstrem’s orchestra (1958–66); he also led a quartet with the guitarist Nikolay Gromin, performing at festivals in Tallinn, Prague, and Moscow. He was a member of the Kontsertny Estradny Orkestr Tsentral’novo TV i Vsesoyuznovo Radio (Concert variety orchestra of the central TV and all-union radio) from 1966 to 1970, and after studying at the Moscow P. I. Tchaikovsky State Conservatory (until 1969) he led the orchestra from 1970 until it disbanded in ...

Article

Gregor  

Michel Laplace

[Kélékian, Krikor ]

(b Turkey, Feb 28, 1898; d Malente, Germany, 1971). Armenian bandleader. From 1928 he led a band in France called the Gregorians, among the members of which were Philippe Brun, Edmond Cohanier, and the pianist Lucien Moraweck; in May 1929 it made a number of recordings that are important in the history of French jazz. Gregor founded the first jazz journal in France, the Revue du jazz, in 1929 and was its editor until it ceased publication in 1930. He toured South America that year with an orchestra that included such illustrious players as Léo Vauchant, Cohanier, and Stephane Grappelli, and returned the following year, when he recorded in Buenos Aires. He continued to lead orchestras of high quality, including such soloists as Alix Combelle, André Ekyan, and Michel Warlop, until 1934. Gregor initiated the French tradition of the show band, a versatile dance orchestra, the instrumentation of which was modeled on that of the big band; his work is well represented by ...

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Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

[Toko ]

(b Tokyo, Jan 3, 1946; d Tokyo, May 13, 1999). Japanese drummer and leader , brother of Terumasa Hino. He worked professionally as a tap-dancer from the age of eight and as a drummer from 1963. After playing with a quartet led by the tenor saxophonist Konosuke Saijo, with the Stardusters, and with quintets led by Shungo Sawada and by his brother, he formed his own trio. He moved to New York in 1978 to join JoAnne Brackeen’s trio, recorded with Bob Degen in Germany that same year, and played in the USA with Hugh Masekela, Joe Henderson, and Gary Bartz, among others. In 1980 he returned to Japan, where he rejoined his brother’s band, and from 1995 he toured Japan and the USA as a member of Terumasa Hino’s Asian Jazz All Stars. He played with Aki Takase, Nobuyoshi Ino, Dizzy Gillespie, Eddie Gomez, Pat Metheny, John Scofield, Kenny Kirkland, and many others while leading his own bands, and in the 1990s he recorded with Dave Liebman, Scofield, Mike Stern, and Steve Swallow among his guest soloists. In ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Takarazuka, Japan, Feb 6, 1936). Japanese drummer and leader. He grew up in a musical family and made his professional début at the age of 16. When he was 20 he moved to Tokyo, where he joined the Six Josés, led by the double bass player Shin Watanabe, and then the West Liners, led by the tenor saxophonist Konosuke Saijo. One of the pioneers of modern drumming in Japan, he led several groups of different configurations throughout his career and eventually recorded more than 300 albums. He also formed, with Norio Maeda and the double bass player Yasuo Arakawa, the cooperative group We 3, which was regarded for many years as one of the best jazz trios in Japan. In the early 1960s Inomata lived in the USA and studied drums under Alan Dawson and others. He then returned to Japan, and in 1976 he established his Rhythm Clinic Center to promote educational aspects of jazz. In ...

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Yozo Iwanami

[Joji ]

(b Fukakusa, Kyoto, Japan, June 15, 1927; d Tokyo, November 1, 2003). Japanese drummer and leader. He was brought up in Dairen, Manchuria (now Lü-ten, China), in a musical family, and joined his father’s band there when he was 18. After World War II he returned to Japan, and he began playing professionally in 1947. He worked with the Azumanians, a septet, and from 1953 into the 1980s played in the Big Four, whose founding members were Hidehiko Matsumoto, the pianist Hachidai Nakamura, and the double bass player Mitsuru Ono; the group operated and recorded mainly under Kawaguchi’s leadership. In 1981 he recorded as a leader with Art Blakey, and the following year he performed at the Kool Jazz Festival in New York; he gave concerts in Tokyo and Osaka in 1985. In 1987 he deputized for Blakey at the Mount Fuji Jazz Festival. Kawaguchi used two bass drums and was known for his extended solos; he projected strength and vitality as a drummer but was also capable of great delicacy....

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Kazunori Sugiyama

[Monky ]

(b Akita, Japan, Nov 21, 1953). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up drums at the age of 15 and, before moving to the USA, performed with the trio led by the pianist Kunihiko Sugano, the band led by the vibraphonist and pianist Takashi Oi, and others. In New York he played on the streets, and in 1984 he made his first recording under his own name, leading a hard-bop group whose members included C. Sharpe, Junior Cook, Benny Green, and Lonnie Plaxico. From the early 1990s he worked in both Japan and the USA and established two groups named the Good Fellas. The American version of Good Fellas involved Vincent Herring, Dave Kikoski, and Ira Coleman; the Japanese version also performed and recorded at the Birdland, New York, in 1997. During the same period Kobayashi appeared as a sideman with Lionel Hampton’s orchestra (1991), the tenor saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura (...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Yokohama, Japan, Sept 14, 1948). Japanese flutist and leader. She started on flute at the age of nine, studied the instrument at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo, and began playing jazz following her graduation. From 1974 she led a band which was active in clubs. She also performed with Isao Suzuki’s group in ...

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Walter Ojakäär

(Leonidovich )

(b Chita, Russia, April 2, 1916; d Oct 13, 2005). Russian composer and bandleader. He lived from 1921 in Harbin, China, where with local Russian musicians in 1934 he formed a band that played jazz and dance music at dance halls in Shanghai and on the islands of Hangchow Bay; he also played piano and studied violin at a local music school, from which he graduated in 1935. Later he graduated from the High Technical Centre of Shanghai as an architectural engineer (1944). In 1947 he repatriated his band to the USSR. Having been refused permission to settle in Moscow, the group played at a workers’ club in Kazan, the capital of what was then the Tatar Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic; in addition he studied composition and conducting at the Kazan State Conservatory (graduating in 1953). The 18-piece group worked professionally from 1956 and played jazz exclusively from ...

Article

Wim van Eyle

(b Tjirebon, Dutch East Indies [now Cirebon, Indonesia], March 15, 1901; d The Hague, Jan 27, 1965). Dutch bandleader and pianist. He studied piano at the Rotterdam Conservatory in the Netherlands, wrote compositions from the early 1920s, and played piano in the Queen’s Melodists; he first worked professionally as a member of the Resonance Seven (...

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Yozo Iwanami and Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Chiba, Japan, Oct 31, 1921). Japanese clarinetist and bandleader. He was a member of a navy band from 1939, and after World War II he played with the Lucky Puppy Orchestra. In 1950 he formed his own band, Jive ACE, which in 1958 became a 16-piece group known as the New Herd; its principal arranger was the guitarist Kozaburo Yamaki. With the group Miyama recorded with Charles Mingus (1971) and other American musicians and from 1974 appeared at festivals in Monterey (California) (1974), New York (1975), The Hague, South America (1978), India (1982), and Nice (1985). He celebrated his 45th anniversary as a bandleader with a special concert in 1995, and continued to lead the New Herd into the new century. Miyama favors a driving, swinging style that recalls the work of Dizzy Gillespie’s big bands; his repertory includes such jazz standards as ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Jan 27, 1945). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up piano at the age of seven and drums when he was 19; later he graduated in percussion from the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music. As a member of Yosuke Yamashita’s trio from 1967 through 1975 he performed frequently in Europe to critical acclaim. From 1977 he led his own quartet. Moriyama settled in Nagoya in the late 1970s and regularly led jam sessions at one of the principal jazz clubs there. He played at the festival in Nuremberg, Germany, in 1984 and in a duo with Yamashita in Paris in 1986.

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, March 14, 1948). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up drums at the age of 15 and made his professional début with Takehiro Honda’s trio in 1967. During the following decade or so he performed with Masabumi Kikuchi (1969–72, 1973), Sadao Watanabe (1972, 1975), Kosuke Mine and Honda (both 1976–7), and Native Son, led by Honda and Mine (1978–81). After living intermittently in the USA he settled in Japan in 1983. Murakami led his own ensembles from 1981, and he also performed with the group led by the alto saxophonist Hidefumi Toki from 1996 and with Manabu Oishi’s trio from 1997.

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Kazunori Sugiyama

[Ponta ]

(b Nishinomiya, Japan, Jan 1, 1951). Japanese drummer and leader. He started on french horn at the age of 12, took up timpani and other classical percussion when he was 16, and then changed to drums. In 1972 he began working professionally and joined groups led by Sadao Watanabe, Yosuke Yamashita, Kazumi Watanabe, Akira Sakata, and Takashi Kako, among many others. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Jan 25, 1947). Japanese flutist and leader. He studied flute at the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music (graduating in 1969) and continued with lessons under Jean-Pierre Rampal and others; at the same time he learned jazz theory under Sadao Watanabe and Masahiko Sato. Nakagawa was principally a classical performer in his early professional career and toured overseas extensively from ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Aug 11, 1966). Japanese drummer and leader. He started playing drums at the age of three, when he was given a miniature set as a birthday gift. While living in Kenya from ages five to eight he worked professionally as a musician at the Nairobi National Theater for a month. After returning to Japan he studied drums privately (1975–8). He was featured on various radio and TV programs as a child prodigy and gave his first recital in Tokyo when he was 11; that same year he recorded his first album as a leader. In 1978 he accompanied Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Stitt at the Monterey Jazz Festival in Japan. He then worked with Toshiyuki Honda (1978–84), Mikio Masuda (1984–7), and Fumio Karashima (1987–91). Having graduated from Hosei University in 1987, he moved in 1991 to New York, where he later performed with Kenny Garrett, Don Friedman, and Ron McClure, among many others. Okudaira became a member of Carlos Garnett’s quartet in ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Akita, Japan, Sept 28, 1966). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up drums at the age of ten and in 1986 enrolled at the Berklee College of Music. In 1990 he returned to Japan to start a professional career, and his participation that same year in Roy Hargrove’s quartet with Yutaka Shiina led to the formation, in 1991, of the quintet Jazz Networks (with the addition of Antonio Hart); the group made several successful recordings. In 1992, with Tomonao Hara, Osaka formed a quintet. He teaches part-time at Senzoku Junior College.

Article

Guillermo I. Olliver and Rainer E. Lotz

[Mike; Muhiddin, Ahmed]

(b Constantinople [now Istanbul], Sept 24, 1905). Argentine bandleader, banjoist, guitarist, and singer of Turkish birth. While attending the University of Michigan he played banjo under the name Ahmed Muhiddin in student bands (1924–31) and in an orchestra led by Jean Goldkette (1927). He worked as a newspaper correspondent in Uruguay and at the same time played in and around Montevideo in a trio led by the pianist Luis Rolero, with which he later moved to Buenos Aires; after this group disbanded in 1934 he joined the Dixie Pals, led by the violinist Paul Wyer, with which he recorded several tracks for Victor, including a version of his own composition Africa (1934, 37642). From 1936 to the early 1940s he played with the pianist Rene Cospito and his Orquesta Argentina de Jazz, with the drummer Mario D’Alo’s Rhythm Kings, and in a group modeled after the Quintette du Hot Club de France that included Hernán Oliva (violin), Dave Washington (second guitar), and Louis Vola (double bass). In the late 1930s, by which time he had taken the name Ahmed Ratip, he studied harmony with the bandleader Russ Goudy. Early in ...

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W. Anthony Sheppard

[Takeshi ]

(b Sacramento, CA, Nov 11, 1922; d San Dimas, CA, April 17, 2002). American Jazz and film music arranger, composer, and band leader. Shindo grew up in the Little Tokyo district of Los Angeles where he heard traditional Japanese music. In his teens, he became interested in jazz but planned to pursue a career in electrical engineering. As a second generation (Nisei) Japanese American, Shindo was interned at the Manzanar Relocation Center in March 1942. He pursued musical studies in the camp and completed correspondence courses in orchestration. Shindo left Manzanar in November 1944 when he enlisted as a translator in the Military Intelligence Service. Discharged from the Army in 1947, he formed his own big band in Los Angeles.

Shindo continued musical studies at multiple institutions in Los Angeles, studying composition at the University of Southern California with miklós Rózsa and eventually completing a Masters in Asian Studies in ...