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Nicholas Temperley

(b Kensington, London, Nov 20, 1766; d Bristol, May 15, 1821). English composer and theorist. Entering music as a largely self-taught amateur, he became a popular glee composer and a respected authority on music theory.

He was the son of a builder, Thomas Callcott, by his second wife, Charlotte Wall, and was educated at a private school by William Young; he was a brilliant student of classics, Hebrew and philosophy. Until he was 13 it was planned that he should become a surgeon, but he was so disgusted by witnessing an operation that he gave up this idea. He had learnt something of music from Henry Whitney, organist of Kensington parish church, and he began to practise the organ seriously while continuing to pursue, untaught, the study of languages and mathematics. He also learnt to play the clarinet and the oboe, and began to compose. In 1782 he became acquainted with Samuel Arnold and Benjamin Cooke, who encouraged him to enter the profession; the next year he became assistant organist of St George’s, Bloomsbury. Through Cooke he was admitted as a ‘supernumerary hautboy’ at the concerts of the Academy of Ancient Music. From this time onwards his efforts in composition were mainly devoted to the glee. His first glee, ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(b Gloucester, Dec 13, 1770; d Holmer, nr Hereford, Feb 22, 1836). English organist and composer. He was the son of John Clarke of Malmesbury, Wiltshire (d. 1802) and Amphillis Whitfeld (d. 1813). He studied music at Oxford (against his family's wishes) under Philip Hayes. He was organist at Ludlow parish church, 1789, then at Armagh Cathedral, 1794, where his ‘irresponsibility and extravagance’ got him into bad odour with the authorities. Next he was Master of the Choristers at St Patrick's and Christ Church cathedrals, Dublin, 1798; organist of Trinity and St John's colleges, Cambridge, 1799; and organist of Hereford Cathedral, 1820. He was pensioned off by the Hereford chapter in 1833, having become incapacitated by paralysis. He took the BMus degree at Oxford (1793), honorary MusD at Dublin (1795) and MusD at Cambridge (1799, incorporated at Oxford, 1810). In ...

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Nicholas Temperley

[Jackson of Masham]

(b Masham, Yorks., Jan 9, 1815; d Bradford, April 15, 1866). English composer . He was known as ‘Jackson of Masham’ to distinguish him from William Jackson ‘of Exeter’ (1730–1803). He was the son of a miller, John Jackson, and left school at 13 to work in the mill and bakery. In his free time he taught himself first to repair, and then to construct, organs; he also learnt how to play various instruments, and the elements of thoroughbass, using tutors and scores from the public library. In 1832 he was appointed first organist of Masham church. In 1839 he went into business as a tallow-chandler, but in the same year his first composition, an anthem, was published. He progressed to a prize glee (1840), a setting of Psalm ciii (Huddersfield Choral Society, 1841), and finally, in 1844, to the highest rung of the ladder – an oratorio, ...

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W.H. Husk

revised by Nicholas Temperley

(Herbert Bonaparte)

(b London, Nov 15, 1800; d London, Jan 22, 1852). English composer and playwright. He was a pupil of Vincent Novello and Henry Bishop. His brother (James) Thomas Gooderham Rodwell was proprietor and manager of the Adelphi Theatre, where his first musical stage piece (Waverley) was produced in 1824. In March 1825, on his brother’s death, he succeeded to the proprietorship. In 1828 he became a professor of harmony and composition at the RAM, and in 1836 he was appointed director of the music at Covent Garden, where his most successful piece, Teddy the Tiler, had been produced in 1830. There he assisted in the Covent Garden policy of trying to anticipate the repertory of Drury Lane, as in the case of his version of Auber's The Bronze Horse. He wrote the words of many farces and melodramas (Nicoll lists 21 besides the ones for which he composed music), and also a novel, ...

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