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Daluka  

Goblet drum of Sudan. It is traditionally made of clay and played by women, notably by the main singer during spirit possession ceremonies. The Arabic name daluka, of Nubian origin, denotes a small drum beaten by the hand; in a bowl excavated from Tumulus VI at Hobagi, Meroe, one such drum is shown hanging from the drummer’s neck....

Article

Kakosh  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Fiddle of the Holo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a cylindrical wooden resonator with integral neck holding two or three vegetable-fibre strings. The soundboard, usually of soft wood and replaced often, is either loosely laid or nailed upon the resonator. Some instruments have a head sculpted at the end of the neck. ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Braced Musical bow of the Lunda people of Kasayi-Shaba, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has an attached half-calabash resonator. The bow is held vertically near the lower end by the left hand so that the middle finger can extend to touch the string lightly. The open end of the calabash is placed against the player’s chest and raised from time to time to modulate the sound and emphasize different overtones. The instrument is used mostly to accompany singing. Other names reported are ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

David Blazey

(Gordon)

(b Johannesburg, Dec 2, 1957). South African composer . He studied at the University of Cape Town, where his teachers included Klatzow and James May (BMus 1978, MMus 1986), at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst, Stuttgart, with Lachenmann (Künstlerische Abschlussprüfung, 1989) and at Keele University with George Nicholson. His music is primarily linear in conception. By superimposing independent musical strata, he creates irregular rhythmic patterns that are either augmented to become the form of the composition, or diminished to be perceived as individual rhythmic units. Specific pitches are identified with each impulse of the resulting rhythms and a harmony or harmonic field is associated with each pitch. The influence of his South African-Jewish roots and their cultural associations within Germany, the country he has adopted as his home, are reflected in the titles of his compositions. Many works are scored for unusual instruments and ensembles....

Article

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Ferdinand J. de Hen

[kudrenene]

Ground zither of the Daka, Mamvu, Mangutu, Balese, Logo, Mayanga, and Nkundo peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A pit is dug about 25 to 30 cm deep and 20 cm in diameter, and covered with a piece of bark, which is pegged to the ground. From the centre of the bark rises a vertical stick supporting a single string that is also pegged to the ground at both ends. The two segments of the string are of different lengths and produce two different notes. The instrument is played by two boys, each with two sticks. One strikes the left segment of the string, the other the right. Other names reported for this instrument are kuzegne (Balese), kakalari (Logo), nedongu (Mangbetu), tindi de kileru, kudrugu (Kilima and Andernanza), kikilo, and dzi-dzingba.

LaurentyC, 110 B. Costermans: ‘Muziekinstrumenten van Watsa-Gombari en omstreken’, Zaïre, 1 (1947), 629–63 J.-S. Laurenty: L’Organologie du Zaïre...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Boa people in the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The resonator is made of bark bent around three sticks curved in an arch and stuck in the underside of the rectangular wooden soundtable, forming a shape like a boat hull. The number of wooden tongues varies from six or eight (the usual number) to fourteen....

Article

Rapapa  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Symmetrical bowl lyre of the Bari people in the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has five to seven strings made of twisted leather strips, and a bridge (lacking in similar lyres of the Zande and Mangbetu). The Bari always use a resonator made of a tortoise shell with its bottom plate replaced by an antelope-skin belly. ...

Article

Richard Wigmore

(b Rochovot, Israel, Jan 14, 1960). South African bass-baritone of Israeli birth. The son of an Israeli father and an English mother, he emigrated to South Africa with his family in 1966. After studying singing at the RNCM in Manchester and at the University of Toronto, Saks made his professional début in 1982, in the title role in The Mikado at Stratford, Ontario. He learnt his operatic craft in Germany, singing with the Gelsenkirchen Opera from 1985 to 1988 and the Bielefeld Opera from 1988 to 1991. From 1992 to 1994 he was principal bass-baritone with Scottish Opera. Although he was admired in roles such as Leporello, this period was marred by clashes with the management over the company’s style of productions. He made his Covent Garden début, as Mr Flint in Billy Budd, in 1995 and the following year sang his first major Wagner role, Daland (...

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