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H. Wiley Hitchcock

revised by Nicholas Temperley

(b Swanton Morley, Norfolk, bap. Jan 15, 1571; d Amsterdam, ?1622–3). English minister and psalmodist. He attended Cambridge University from 1586 to 1591, leaving without a degree. He was expatriated as a ‘Brownist’ in 1593 and settled in Amsterdam, where he became ‘teacher’ of the Ancient Separatist Church in 1596; in 1610 he founded an Independent church, becoming minister of it himself. He took the Calvinist position on predestination. He was the author of a number of controversial religious tracts, annotations, and translations of scripture. Many consider him one of the finest Hebrew scholars of his day. His Book of Psalmes: Englished both in Prose and Metre, with Annotations (Amsterdam, 1612, 4/1644; music ed. in ISAMm, xv, Brooklyn, NY, 1981) contains all 150 psalms in a new metrical version, together with prose translations and annotations. 48 are provided with monophonic tunes (six melodies are used twice and one three times). 21 of the 40 tunes are drawn from the Continental Reformed tradition, and 16 are from English sources (including three of the newer, short variety such as ...

Article

Renee Lapp Norris

(b Northborough, MA, Sept 5, 1830; d Madison, WI, Dec 9, 1889). American classical scholar, teacher, editor, and writer. Allen is best known musically as an editor of Slave Songs of the United States (New York, 1867), also edited by Charles Pickard Ware and Lucy McKim Garrison, who were white collectors of black music.

Allen graduated from Harvard in 1851, subsequently studied in Europe, and returned to the United States in 1856. In 1863 he began an eight-month stint as a teacher on St Helena Island in South Carolina, home to former slaves who remained after plantation owners left in 1861. Here, Allen gained first-hand experience of slave singing that contributed to the detailed explanations of his 36-page prologue to Slave Songs. In 1867 Allen was appointed chair of ancient languages at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where he remained until his death.

Allen’s interest in philology is evident in the many pages of the prologue to ...

Article

Carolyn Gianturco and Teresa M. Gialdroni

(b Mosso Santa Maria, nr Biella, Jan 31, 1921). Italian musicologist. He took diplomas in piano at the Parma Conservatory (1942) and in choral music at the Turin Conservatory (1948), and studied music history with Della Corte at Turin University, where he took an arts degree (1946). He subsequently taught music history in the conservatories of Bolzano (1950–51), Parma (1951–5) and Milan (1954–88); he has edited the journals Almanacco musicale italiano (1954–5), Ricordiana (1955–7) and Musica d’oggi (1958–63) and has been vice-director of Enciclopedia della musica Ricordi (1960–64). He has been a consulting editor for Ricordi since 1964. Music education is one of his major interests: he became director of the series Manuali di Didattica Musicale and Canti nel Mondo (Ricordi) in 1965, and editor of Educazione musicale...

Article

(b Comber, Co. Down, Aug 10, 1904; d Oxford, Oct 10, 1965). Northern Irish music scholar, teacher, organist, composer and editor. He went to Bedford School, and studied at the RCM in London, Trinity College, Dublin, and New College, Oxford, gaining doctorates of music at both universities. In 1938, after four years as organist and choirmaster at Beverley Minster, he moved to a similar position at New College. Thereafter, he lived and worked in Oxford, where he was a university lecturer in music and a Fellow of New College, and later of Balliol. He also taught at the RCM.

Andrews's published work consists of three books, various articles (including contributions to the fifth edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music), reviews, and several motets, services and songs. The Oxford Harmony, vol.ii, traces the development of chromatic harmony through standard repertory works and relates this to techniques of composition. The opening chapters of ...

Article

H. Wiley Hitchcock

(b New York, June 3, 1851; d Dresden, Oct 13, 1934). American music scholar and lexicographer. Trained as a young man for a business career, he decided rather on music. For a time he was an organist in Concord, Massachusetts. He went to Germany to study in 1874 and took the doctorate at Leipzig in 1882 with a dissertation based on field studies among the Seneca Indians in New York state. This, the first serious work on American Indian music, was shown to MacDowell by Henry Gilbert, and provided themes for MacDowell's Second (‘Indian’) Suite for orchestra. Baker returned to the USA in 1891 and became literary editor and translator for the music publishing firm of Schirmer, Inc. (1892), a post he held until his retirement in 1926, when he returned to Germany. Besides making many translations into English of books, librettos and articles (the last especially for the ...

Article

Vilena Vrbanić

(b Zagreb, May 13, 1956). Croatian-American musicologist and editor. He studied musicology at the Zagreb Music Academy (BA 1980; MA 1983) and received the PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1997) with a dissertation on music in medieval and renaissance astrological imagery. He was a researcher at the institutes of musicology of the Zagreb Music Academy (1980) and the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (1981; 1983–8) and also editor at the Croatian Music Information Center (1982–3).

He is affiliated with the Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM; in various functions since 1987; executive editor since 1996), and with the Research Center for Music Iconography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (associate director 1991–7; director since 1998). In 1998 he founded the journal Music in Art...

Article

Jon Newsom

(b New York, Dec 1, 1905; d New York, Dec 16, 1967). American editor and musicologist. He attended City College, New York, and studied music privately, but as a music scholar he was largely self-educated. His career in editing and music publishing began with his appointment as associate editor of the Musical Quarterly (1945–67) and manager of the publications department at G. Schirmer (1945–54); he subsequently became chairman of the publication committee of the American Musicological Society (1952–4), executive director of the American Section of RISM (1961–5) and music editor at W.W. Norton & Co., New York (1963–7). He also taught at Columbia University (lecturer 1946–52, associate professor 1959–62) and served as president of the American Musicological Society (1963–4). He received a Guggenheim Fellowship (1956) and a Ford Foundation Grant (1961)....

Article

Yolande de Brossard

(b Dompierre, bap. Sept 12, 1655; d Meaux, Aug 10, 1730). French priest, theorist, composer, lexicographer and bibliophile. He was descended from a family founded by Antoine de Brossard (b c1286), a natural son of Charles de Valois (son of Philip the Bold) and Hélène Broschart, daughter of the king's treasurer. Sébastien was the last of a family of glass-blowers from lower Normandy. He studied at the Jesuit college in Caen and then attended that city's famous university, studying philosophy for two years and theology for three. When he turned to music, therefore, he was self-taught; he studied the lute, copying and composing pieces for the instrument. He took minor orders in 1675 and became a sub-deacon the next year, but the date when he became a priest is not known, nor is the date of his arrival in Paris. He was living there in ...

Article

Ellen T. Harris

(b Los Angeles, April 13, 1930; d Venice, Feb 20, 1993). American musicologist and editor. He took the BA at Harvard College in 1951, then studied singing and conducting privately in Vienna. He returned to Harvard in 1953 for graduate studies with Piston, Gombosi, Merritt and John Ward and received the MA in 1954 and the PhD in 1959, with a dissertation under Ward on music in the French secular theatre of the Renaissance. While at Harvard he studied the flute privately with Georges Laurent of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and as a graduate student he conducted and performed both early and 20th-century music extensively in Boston and Cambridge. He first taught at Wellesley College, where he was instructor from 1958 to 1960. In 1960 he was appointed assistant professor at the University of Chicago, where he later became associate professor (1963), professor (1967) and chairman of the music department (...

Article

Richard Griscom

(b Lorain, OH, Mar 22, 1954). American music librarian, theorist, and editor. She received her undergraduate degree in music theory from Ohio University (BM 1976). While completing studies in music theory at Northwestern University (PhD 1985), she joined the staff of the Northwestern University Music Library (1980–98). Campana was also active in the promotion of contemporary music in Chicago through performances with the ensemble Kapture (1977–86) and by editing the monthly newsletter of New Music Chicago (1982–4). Her study of library science at the University of Chicago (MA 1987) led to her appointment as music public services librarian at Northwestern (1987–98). While at Northwestern, she also held appointments as lecturer (1993–8) and assistant dean for undergraduate studies (1993–4) in the School of Music and acting head of the Music Library (1994–6). In ...