1-6 of 6 Results  for:

  • All: Opera for all x
  • Publishing and Recording Industry x
  • Musical Concepts, Genres, and Terms x
Clear all

Article

Desmond Shawe-Taylor

the most assiduous and cosmopolitan opera-going. Not only do more and more of the voluminous works of Rossini, Donizetti and Verdi reach the catalogues, but also the operas of Franz Schreker, George Enescu, Albéric Magnard and many more. A cautious writer now hesitates to describe any opera as inaccessible on disc for fear of being proved wrong by the time his words are printed. As for the standard classics, it is scarcely possible to exaggerate the ‘mushrooming’, during the 1980s, of the record industry and its activities. All this, it may well be thought, is by and

Article

Ronald W. Rodman

broadcast to appeal to the mass viewing market. Eventually, the special broadcasts and commissions for new classical works died out as other TV genres such as dramas, situation comedies, sporting events, and news and current events programmes gained popularity. Almost all classical music broadcast, both of opera and from the concert hall, was taken over by such public television networks as PBS, which began in 1961. The influence of Broadway on television was evident in the NBC broadcast of the Broadway musical Peter Pan starring Mary Martin in the title role. The

Article

Nicholas Temperley

Company; Edinburgh; English Opera Group; Glasgow (opera); Glyndebourne; Intimate Opera Company; Kent Opera (opera); Leeds; Liverpool; London; Manchester (opera); Moody-Manners Company; Norwich; Opera for All; Opera Restor’d; Oxford (opera); Phoenix Opera; and Travelling troupes, §4. Bibliography BurneyH LS NicollH J. Dennis : Essay on the Opera’s after the Italian Manner, which are About to be Establish’d on the English Stage with Some Reflections on the Damage which they may Bring to the Public (London, 1706);

Article

Katherine K. Preston and Michael Mauskapf

lectures each week. After the Civil War, the orientation of the lyceum series (now called “star courses”) shifted from education to entertainment; each local series of 10 or 12 events now included concerts (by solo instrumentalists, singers, opera companies, orchestras, and bands) in addition to lectures. But as individual lyceums all over the country attempted to engage performers and lecturers of national reputation, the organizational structure broke down. In the late 1860s, in response to the resulting chaos, two national lyceum booking agencies emerged: the Boston

Article

films made for television. Nearly three decades later, in carrying out the mandate of the 1976 Copyright Act to establish an American Television and Radio Archives, the Librarian of Congress reviewed the status of all of the Library’s broadcast media (both sound recordings and moving image materials) and decided that it was more efficient to combine all visual, audio, and broadcast holdings into a single administrative unit. This resulted in the establishing of the Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound (MBRS) Division in 1978. The MBRS is responsible for

Article

fundamental lyricism that runs through all his works. Early examples used the limited vocal range of the pop song (‘Close ev’ry door’, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat ), but he gradually adopted a wider melodic range, in Cats drawing on the upper extremes of both the musical theatre ‘belt voice’ in ‘Memory’ and the vernacular ballad singer in ‘The Ballad of Billy McCaw’. With Phantom of the Opera he used a more expansive lyricism suited to the operatic setting, as in the wide melodic leaps of the romantic duet ‘All I Ask of You’, the Puccini-influenced