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Amra Bosnić

(b Dubrovnik, Croatia, 1940). Croatian and Bosnian and Herzegovinian conductor. One of the most significant conductors in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Homen graduated from the Academy of Music in Sarajevo in 1966, under the mentorship of Mladen Pozajić. He also studied composition with Ivan Brkanović and Miroslav Špiler. From 1966, he worked as a conductor at the National Theatre Opera in Sarajevo, and during the 1988–9 concert season he was engaged as the artistic director. Homen has also worked with the National Theatre Ballet in Sarajevo, the Sarajevo Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Sarajevo Radio Television Orchestra. In 1971 he was a part-time associate of the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, teaching subjects including choral conducting; in 1986 he was engaged as an Associate Professor of Opera. Homen was a conductor of the Sarajevo student chorus Slobodan Princip Seljo (1962–91) and the Croatian Cultural Society Chorus Trebević (...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Kuršumlija, Serbia, 1966). Bosnian and Herzegovinian composer. She graduated with a degree in composition from the Academy of Music in Sarajevo (1991), in the class of josip magdić, after which she gained the Master of Composition (2004) under the mentorship of composer dejan despić. Her first position was at the Srednja muzička škola (‘music high school’) in Valjevo, Serbia (1992–2000). She returned to Eastern Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, to work as an Associate Professor of Harmony and Harmonic Analysis.

Dutina’s compositions reflect her interest in Balkan folklore, mostly of a rural-vocal type, and in the formal and harmonic devices associated with neoclassicism. She has composed solo songs, chamber music, symphonic works, vocal-instrumental music, choral music, music for children, and film music.

Dutina also cherishes folkloric vocal traditions through her engagement as founder and artistic director of the female vocal ensembles Rusalke (...

Article

William Berz

(b Cincinnati, OH, 26 Nov 1889; d Cincinnati, OH, 28 Jan 1967). American conductor and cornet virtuoso. Simon began cornet studies at age 11, and continued, in 1905, with herman Bellstedt, the famous cornetist. By 1909 Simon was cornet soloist with several professional bands and a member of the Cincinnati SO under Leopold Stokowski. In 1914, he was invited to join the Sousa Band without an audition, becoming solo cornetist and assistant conductor in 1917 when Herbert L. Clarke retired. In 1920–21 Simon formed the ARMCO Band; it evolved from an amateur group to an elite professional ensemble that presented weekly national broadcasts on NBC radio. In 1930, Simon began serving as band director and cornet instructor at the Cincinnati Conservatory. He retired in 1954 and moved to Arizona for health reasons and began teaching part-time at the University of Arizona. He returned to Cincinnati in 1965 and again taught at the Conservatory....

Article

Marta Ottlová, Milan Pospíšil, John Tyrrell and Kelly St Pierre

[Friedrich]

(b Leitomischl, Bohemia [now Litomyšl, Czech Republic], 2 March 1824; d Prague, 12 May 1884). Czech composer, conductor, teacher, and music critic often described as the ‘father’ or ‘inventor’ of Czech national music. While his first language was German and his first nationalist compositions were based on Swedish narratives, Smetana asserted himself as composer of specifically Czech music from the 1860s, and his music posthumously became synonymous with a Czech national musical style. Today, Smetana’s eight operas, including Prodaná nevěsta (‘The Bartered Bride’), as well as his cycle of symphonic poems Má vlast (‘My Fatherland’) form the foundation of the Czech classical musical canon. His opera Libuše is also frequently cited as an ‘apotheosis’ of Czech music, especially in conjunction with the first movement of Má vlast, entitled ‘Vyšehrad’.

After his death, Smetana was transformed in the minds of his audiences and advocates from a composer of nationalistic music to a national symbol himself; he and his works became enduring points of reference for Czechs’ ever-shifting borders, politics, administrations, ethnicities, and imagined futures through the 20th century. For this reason, the actual Smetana in many ways has become inseparable from the myth of ‘Smetana’, as later critics and historians molded his life and work to match their needs. The composer’s supposed greatness, genius, Czechness, tragic deafness, and heroism all give voice to the shifting needs, anxieties, and interests of his audiences as much as to the composer himself....

Article

Mark Clague

(b Spring Gulch, CO, 12 Feb 1902; d Ann Arbor, MI, 16 July 1994). American band director and educator. A fierce taskmaster, he elevated standards and influenced generations of band directors and musicians. Revelli played violin as a child, training for a career in Chicago's theater orchestras at Chicago Musical College (BM 1922). Earning teaching credentials from Chicago's Columbia School of Music in 1925, he founded the Hobart High School band, leading the ensemble four years later to its first of repeat Indiana state and soon national championships. He continued taking private lessons on all band instruments and studied conducting and music education at Chicago's VanderCook School of Music (BM 1931; MM 1936). In 1935 Revelli became conductor of bands and assistant professor of wind instruments at the University of Michigan, guiding its bands to international prominence. Known as “The Chief,” Revelli required total effort from his players, who both feared and revered him; he championed bandss as a means for educating successful citizens. Beginning in ...