1-20 of 44 items  for:

  • Published Online: 2018 x
  • Music Business, Institutions and Organizations x
Clear all

Article

Article

Article

Article

Article

Music conservatory established with private donations in New York in 1885 by Jeannette Meyer Thurber. Although intended as a national institution, the only federal contribution was $200,000 in 1891. antonín Dvořák was director from 1891 to 1895. Influential in its prime, the conservatory quietly closed around 1930.

E. Rubin: "Jeannette Meyer Thurber (1850–1946): Music for a Democracy," in ...

Article

Article

Claude Conyers

Article

Article

Article

Jonas Westover

This entry addresses a selection of the various places and spaces for music performance in the United States. It is organized with an emphasis on function, considering types of performance venues alongside such issues as repertory, genre, style, and social impact. Virtually any location can host a musical performance; however, this entry will focus on venues that have become known for featuring musical events. Further consideration of venues can be found throughout the dictionary in dedicated entries, among them Casinos; Cruise ships and Riverboats; scores of articles on cities and regions; and topical entries such as African american music, Asian american music, European american music, Environmental music, Happening, Latino music, Native american music, and Sound art.

Music has been a staple of American church life since the Spanish held concerts and services in their Catholic missions. Churches continue to serve as significant venues for music performance, typically sacred in nature. In many religious traditions, an officiant leads the congregation in song; in others, church organists, solo singers, or volunteer choirs perform; still others feature semiprofessional ensembles. To connect with a wider range of parishioners, the Crossing Church in Elk River, Minnesota, features a rock band as part of its services. Outside of regular services, churches often host musical performances of various types, sacred and secular, and may also donate or rent their facilities as performance spaces to community or professional music organizations....

Article

Article

Laura Maes and Troy Rogers

[M&M Robot Orchestra]

Name of an ensemble of acoustic automatons invented and constructed since 1990 by Godfried-Willem Raes (b Ghent, 3 Jan 1952). The Logos Foundation, a contemporary music centre located in Ghent that was founded by Raes in 1968, is home to the more than 45 automatons that comprise the ensemble. It includes organ-like instruments, monophonic wind instruments, string instruments, percussion instruments, and noise generators. Most are automations of existing instruments, and many offer wider possibilities than their manual equivalents. Raes’s intention was not to replace performers, but to expand musical possibilities with machines that can outperform humans in speed, dynamic control, and a number of simultaneously sounding notes. Most of the instruments are tuned to 12-tone equal temperament, although some are tuned to equal tempered quartertones. The sirens robot and all the monophonic wind instruments can be tuned with 0.78125-cent precision and can thus be used with nearly any tuning system....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Czech ensemble for contemporary music. It was founded in 2008 by the French conductor Michel Swierczewski, under the Prague Philharmonic. Since 2009, Prague Modern has operated independently as a civic association with Michel Swierczewski as chief conductor from 2009 to 2011. Marián Lejava became chief conductor in 2013, with Pascal Gallois taking the role of Principal Guest Conductor in 2015.

They have performed at numerous festivals including Prague Spring, Ostrava Days of New Music, Contempuls, and MusicOlomouc in the Czech Republic, and Musica Strasbourg, Dartington Summer Festival, Festival de musique de Besancon Franché Comte, Poznań Music Spring, and Cafe Budapest Fest abroad. They are the resident ensemble for the concert series Krása dneška (‘Beauty of Today’) and have produced numerous recordings; their disc of Dai Fujikura’s works conducted by Pascal Gallois received the Coup de couer of the Academié Charles Cros.

They have premiered pieces by composers such as Miroslav Srnka, František Chaloupka, Marián Lejava, Francois Sarhan, Peter Koeszeghy, Mika Pelo, and Elia Koussa, and have also collaborated across genres, notably with the filmmaker Jan Švankmajer, the visual artist Kateřina Vincourová, the photographer Markéta Othová, and the actresses Fanny Ardant and Anne Bennent....

Article

Article

Article

Article

Article

Article

Article