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Article

Torben Schousboe

in 1827 . From 1829 to 1831 he made a study tour of Germany, Paris and Italy, having already made a name as a composer of string quartets and overtures. When Schall retired in 1834 , Frøhlich was one of three alternating conductors chosen to succeed him; later he conducted all the opera performances. He was a director of the Musikforening from its founding in 1836 until 1841 and chairman in 1836–7 . He went on leave to Italy in 1838 to recover from a street accident and a stroke. On his return he wrote the music for some of Bournonville’s ballets, but ill-health

Article

Martin Eastick

45; 2 Etudes de Concert, op.48 Suite, G, op.50 (1892) Frühling, 5 Stücke, op.57 (1896) [8] Tristesses et Sourires, op.58 (1896) 3 Mazurkas, op.60 (1898) 4 Morceaux, op.68 (1902) Valse de concert, F, op.69 (1902) 15 Etudes de virtuosité, ‘Per aspera’, op.72 (1903) Chanson bohème de l'opéra ‘Carmen’ de G. Bizet, transcription de concert (1906) 10 Pièces mignonnes, op.77 (1907) Grande valse de concert, G♭, op.88 (1912) [5] Tanzmomente, op.89 (1912) Isolden's Tod, Schluss-Szene aus Tristan und Isolde von Richard Wagner, paraphrase (1914) 6 Morceaux, op.93 (1916)

Article

Andrew Lamb

York, 1983) F. Mailer : Weltbürger der Musik: eine Oscar-Straus-Biographie (Vienna, 1985) W.E. Studwell : ‘In the Tradition of the Strauss Family: … an Essay and Bibliography’, Music Reference Services Quarterly , 3/4 (1995), 45–53 See also from The New Grove Dictionary of Opera : Tapfere Soldat, Der ; and Walzertraum, Ein .

Article

Norbert Carnovale and Richard Dyer

Steuermann, both of whom became his friends and mentors, through his wife, Marjorie Black, a singer and pianist. Schoenberg’s theories, life, and work were particularly influential to Schuller throughout his subsequent career. From 1945 to 1959 Schuller played in the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, spending nine seasons as principal and working with many prominent conductors. During this period, he pursued his interest in jazz, sparked by an Ellington concert he had heard in Cincinnati. He listened to recordings obsessively and comprehensively, notating path-breaking

Article

light early operas. At the threshold of the 20th century he embarked on the ten years of vocal-orchestral frescos, the triptych of oratorios ( La croisade des enfants , Les enfants à Bethléem , Saint François d'Assise ) which were followed by the Piano Quintet, a work typical of the manner of the second period, on the one hand, and on the other some solid concertante works and other orchestral pieces. The final period, 1916–36 , was dominated by the chamber music, the best of the ballet scores (above all Cydalise et le chèvre-pied ), the comic opera Fragonard

Article

3. Return to Bonn. In the spring of 1839 she returned to Bonn to finalize her divorce, intending initially to return to Berlin. As a polished performer and experienced teacher, Johanna attracted many students. She re-established the Gesangverein , whose performances of operas, operettas, and oratorios, which she directed, made an important contribution to concert life in Bonn. Together with the poet, Protestant theologian, and art historian Gottfried Kinkel, she co-founded the literary circle Der Maikäferbund . The intellectual exchange with the groups’

Article

Armineh Grigorian

revised by Robert Atayan and Aram Kerovpyan

have been produced by the Arts Institute of the Armenian Academy of Sciences, is being continued by other publishers. 2. Works. Robert Atayan, revised by Aram Kerovpyan Komitas’s folksong collections are remarkable for their precision and variety; all the poetic forms, many dialect types and all the modal and rhythmic species are represented. One of his most valuable discoveries was that, apart from ancient folk melodies such as the improvisatory agricultural tunes, the hayren songs of the early gusan (professional minstrels) tradition and variations

Article

Giorgos Sakallieros

Air Force in the Libya front. In 1944 he won the first prize in the Eistedfodd Festival in Cairo, both in piano performance and composition. He conducted his first major symphonic work, Œdipe-roi , at the Cairo Opera in 1945 . In 1947–8 he studied piano and composition at the Schola Cantorum, Paris, graduating with honours. He toured extensively all over the world either as recitalist or as accompanist for renowned soloists like Jacques Thibaud, Christian Ferras, and Henryk Szeryng. With French violinist Colette Frantz he founded and ran a music school and a chamber