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Article

Ralph P. Locke

française , no.6 (1981) R. Fiske : Scotland in Music: a European Enthusiasm (Cambridge, 1983) R. Savage : ‘Rameau’s American Dancers’, EMc , 11 (1983), 441–52 J. Maehder , ed.: Esotismo e colore locale nell’opera di Puccini (Pisa, 1985) B. Nettl : The Western Impact on World Music: Change, Adaptation, and Survival (New York, 1985), 68–71, 84–90 I. Guest , ed.: Gautier on Dance (London, 1986), 36–50, 134–7 [reviews of Indian dancers, 1838, 1844] J.-J. Nattiez , ed. P. Boulez : Orientations: Collected Writings (Cambridge, 1986), 161–2, 339–41, 422–4

Article

avant-garde performances of dance, theater, and music, including jazz. Ornette Coleman first recorded for its label, Caravan of Dreams Productions, in 1985 . It also presented jazz in mainstream styles, with Herbie Hancock, Stanley Turrentine, Carmen McRae, Billy Eckstine, and Grover Washington, Jr., among those who appeared there. (< http://www.caravanofdreams.com > ( 2001 )) Frederick, MD Dancing Pavilion [Waltz Dream]. 400 block of West Patrick Street. In 1930–31 it hosted weekly dances featuring mainly locally based African-American bands, including Ike Dixon’s

Article

Carl Leafstedt

its early years gave premieres of several of Strauss’s works, including the Rosenkavalier Suite (American premiere, 1949 ) and Josephslegende (world premiere, 26 February 1949 ). Under Reiter and his successor, Victor Alessandro (conductor, 1950–76 ), the orchestra developed an excellent national reputation. Its performances took place in Municipal Auditorium, the Theater for the Performing Arts, and outdoors at the Arneson River Theater and Sunken Garden Theater. Later venues included Laurie Auditorium on the campus of Trinity University, the Scottish Rite Temple

Article

Philip V. Bohlman

dy Folklore,” Journal of American Folklore , 3 (1890), 257 J.P. Sousa : National, Patriotic and Typical Airs of All Lands (Philadelphia, PA, 1890) B. Gilman : “Zuñi Melodies,” Journal of American Ethnology and Archaeology , 1 (1891), 63 A.C. Fletcher , F. La Flesche , and J. Fillmore : A Study of Omaha Indian Music (Baltimore, 1893) [35ff repr. as “The Wa-wan, or Pipe Dance of the Omahas,” Music , 4 (1893), 468] J.C. Fillmore : “What Do Indians Mean to Do When They Sing, and How Far Do They Succeed?,” Journal of American Folklore , 8 (1895), 138

Article

Anthony Seeger

adopted by non-Indians. Maracas , gourd rattles found in many local traditions in the Americas, take their name from the language of the Tupi Indians of Brazil, where maraká can mean ‘rattle’ or ‘music’ (Bastos, 1978 ). With the exception of Peru, where national popular music styles like the huyano can be clearly identified with Andean Indian origins, there has been little obvious borrowing of Amerindian styles in popular music in the Americas, although some Amerindian performers in Canada have become popular in their own right. Some regional dance forms in South

Article

Laurence Libin and Albert R. Rice

Quarterly , xvi/3 ( 1991 , 19–23); Music, Theater, Dance: an Illustrated Guide ( 1993 ); R. Hargrave: Amati, Stradivari & Guarneri: the Library of Congress Violins ( 1997 ). Washington, DC. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior: western art and traditional, ethnological, archaeological, esp. Native American. Washington, DC. Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of African Art: 119, mainly percussion. Washington, DC. Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History: c 5000 American and European art, traditional, jazz, and popular

Article

Regula Qureshi, Harold S. Powers, Jonathan Katz, Richard Widdess, Gordon Geekie, Alastair Dick, Devdan Sen, Nazir A. Jairazbhoy, Peter Manuel, Robert Simon, Joseph J. Palackal, Soniya K. Brar, M. Whitney Kelting, Edward O. Henry, Maria Lord, Alison Arnold, Warren Pinckney, Kapila Vatsyayan and Bonnie C. Wade

Yakṣagāna: a Dance Drama of India (New Delhi, 1977) K. Vatsyayan : Traditional Indian Theatre: Multiple Streams (New Delhi, 1980) P. Banerji : Aesthetics of Indian Folk Dance (New Delhi, 1982) M.T. Dhoopad : Krishnattam: a Dance Drama of Kerala (Bangalore, 1982) W. Ashley and R. Holloman : ‘Teyyam’, Indian Theatre: Traditions of Performance , ed. F.P. Richmond , D.L. Swann , and P. Zarrilli (Honolulu, 1990), 131–50 R.A. Frasca : The Theater of the Mahabharata: Terukkūttu Performances in South India (Honolulu,1990) F.P. Richmond : ‘Kūṭiyāṭṭam’, Indian Theatre:

Article

Val Wilmer

Deniz ( b Cardiff , Aug 17, 1924 ; d London , Feb 14, 1996 ). British guitarist . He took piano lessons and began playing ukulele as a child. At the age of 12 he joined the Harlem Pages and toured theaters for two years before linking up with a jazz accordionist. In London the duo played at wartime “dives” and for US army camp dances. Deniz also worked with Buddy Featherstonhaugh and the young Victor Feldman. While his brother (2) Joe Deniz played solo on electric guitar for Stephane Grappelli, he contributed acoustic rhythm guitar, then in 1947

Article

Carolina Robertson and Gerard Béhague

matching the pace and rhythm of the corresponding labour. (ii) Dances, autos and dramatic dances. South America enjoys a well-known distinction in the category of secular folk and popular dances, many of which originated in the Iberian peninsula and retain significant traits specific to much Spanish folkdancing ( zapateado shoe tapping, finger snapping, use of scarf or handkerchief). This is the case of the Argentine chacarera , whose name is derived from chacra meaning ‘farm’ (from the Quechua Indian chagra ‘cornfield’). The chacarera was probably created by

Article

Edward Strickland

process of Song I and II to the pristine lyricism of jazz-flavoured ballads such as ‘Mont Blanc’, from Voyage of the Beagle . Works Stage Voyage of the Beagle (music theatre, J.A. Akalaitis), 1983–7 Extensions (dance score, choreog. L. Childs), s sax, tape, 1980 Q-Music (dance score, choreog. Childs), small ens, 1980 Relative Calm (dance score, choreog. Childs), small ens, tape, 1981 Vocal Running Commentary (A–Z), 1 or more vv, 1980–87 Running Commentary (Arbitrary Excerpts), 1v, small ens, 1992 Talk is Cheap, 1v, small ens, 1996 Big Fish Little

Article

Bernal Flores Zeller and Laura Cervantes Gamboa

bands occur on a regular basis in many dance clubs. Large street concerts with well-known international artists are held frequently, as Costa Rica is now recognized as an effective marketing place in Central America. Working-class people attend fairly large dance clubs called salones de baile where they dance mostly popular rhythms such as salsa, cumbia , merengue and bolero pirateado , although, because of the influence of popular dance academies, middle-class people also now attend. Young middle-class people prefer small dance clubs called discotecas at weekends

Article

Brazil  

Gerard Béhague

stresses dotted rhythms and syncopations. Ex.20 Cururu The cateretê or catira , a dance of probable Indian origin used for conversion purposes by the Jesuits, is another popular religious dance. It is found in the states of Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, São Paulo, Mato Grosso, Goiás and several north-eastern states. Two viola players and an even number of exclusively male dancers participate. In certain communities only female dancers are present. The dance takes place generally at night and indoors. Once more the mestre and contramestre sing in duet

Article

Stephen J. Adams

revised by Megan E. Hill

(Dordrecht, 1985), 87–98 The Thinking Ear: Complete Writings on Music Education (Toronto, 1986) Patria and the Theatre of Confluence (Indian River, ON, 1991); repr. Descant , 22 (Summer 1991) A Sound Education: 100 Exercises in Listening and Sound-Making (Indian River, ON, 1992) Voices of Tyranny: Temples of Silence (Indian River, ON, 1993) Patria: the Complete Cycle (Toronto, 2002) Works Music THEATER Loving (Schafer), 1963–6 Patria 1 Wolfman (The Characteristics Man) (Schafer), 31 actors

Article

Trân Văn Khê

revised by Nguyen Thuyet Phong

(Danbury, CT, 1990) Nguyễn Thuyết Phong , ed.: New Perspectives on Vietnamese Music: Six Essays (New Haven, CT, 1991) See also South-east Asia, §6(ix): Dance and theatre: Vietnam Trân Van Khê National anthems: Venezuela Sarunai Solmization, §II, 2: Ancient and non-European systems: China and Korea Nguyen Thuyet Phong United States of America, §II, 5(iv)(a): Traditional music, Asian American., v) South-east Asian., Mainland. Đ àn bau Đàn tranh

Article

to libretto and lyric writing that influenced all the major theatre songwriters of the postwar American theatre, and his works, particularly Show Boat and those with Rodgers, remain in the popular musical theatre repertory. Works ( selective list ) composers in parentheses; dates those of the first New York performance unless otherwise stated Stage Wildflower (V. Youmans, H. Stothart), Casino, 7 Feb 1923 Rose-Marie (R. Friml), Imperial, 2 Sept 1924 [incl. Indian Love Call, Rose-Marie; films, 1936, 1954] Sunny (J. Kern), New Amsterdam, 22 Sept 1925 [incl.

Article

Gerald Bordman

revised by William A. Everett and Deane L. Root

publishers: Boston, Famous, Harms, Robbins, G. Schirmer Bibliography S. Green : The World of Musical Comedy (New York, 1960, rev. and enlarged 4/1980) D. Ewen : Composers for the American Musical Theater (New York, 1968) Record of the Works of Rudolf Friml (New York, c 1968) [list of works] G. Bordman : American Operetta from H.M.S. Pinafore to Sweeney Todd (New York, 1981) R. Traubner : Operetta: a Theatrical History (Garden City, NY, 1983)

Article

Israel J. Katz

(Foz); that it is derived from the jota aragonesa (Larramendi, Ribera), although Ribera also proposed an earlier Arabic origin; and that the Arabic fandûra (guitar) may be a possible etymological source (Pottier). Yet the two prevailing theories point to either a West Indian or Latin American origin ( Diccionario de Autoridades ), although Puyana strongly suggests that the fandango indiano came from Mexico; (see also Osorio); or a North African origin (Moreau de Saint-Méry). One must distinguish between the varied provincial forms that the classical fandango

Article

Sabine Feisst

and solo instrumental Always Very Soft, 3 perc, 1973, rev. 2007 Green Corn Dance, 6 perc, 1974 songbirdsongs, 2 pic, 3 perc, opt. vn, 1974–80 Strange Birds Passing, fl ens, 1983 Giving Birth to Thunder, Sleeping with his Daughter, Coyote builds North American, nar, E♭ cl + cb cl, vn, db, 4 perc, 1986–90 5 Yup’ik Dances, pf/hp, 1991–4 Strange and Sacred Noise, perc qt, 1991–7 5 Athabascan Dances, hp, perc, 1992, arr. gui, hp, perc, 1996 Crow and Weasel (after B. Lopez), pic + b cl, 4 perc

Article

Donald Thompson

19th century and the introduction of black Americans at various periods. The indigenous Arawak Indian contribution is minimal; so rapid was the Spanish domination of the island’s indigenous population that within a few generations of the Conquest scarcely a trace of Arawak influence could be noted in Puerto Rican life. Early descriptions of the musical and ceremonial use of Arawak implements are limited to gourd rattles and to the bastón , an ornamented stick struck heavily against the ground. The areito (a ceremonial dance) was practised throughout the Greater Antilles

Article

Tan Dun  

Joanna C. Lee

while Silk Road for soprano and percussion ( 1989 ) draws on a number of the vocal techniques (including falsetto, glissando and sharply articulated consonants) associated with it. Tan’s first full-length stage work was Nine Songs ( 1989 ), a ‘non-narrative, even surreal’ music-dance drama which derives both its fragments of text (in English and classical Chinese) and its ritualistic essence from poetry by Qu Yuan ( 340–277 bce ). It is also one of a number of Tan’s works to employ original Chinese ceramic instruments. Altogether more ambitious in scale was