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Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

Flutist Quarterly , xv ( 1990 ), 5–11 R. Sheldon: ‘The Musical Instrument Collections of the Library of Congress’, Flutist Quarterly , xvi/3 ( 1991 ) Music, Theater, Dance: an Illustrated Guide ( 1993 ) R. Hargrave: Amati, Stradivari & Guarneri: the Library of Congress Violins ( 1997 ) National Museum of American History (formerly Museum of History and Technology) Smithsonian Institution: c 5000 American and European art, traditional, jazz and popular, incl. 268 keyboards and Hugo Worch (keyboards), part of Mrs. W.D. Frishmuth, and Janos Scholz (cello bow) c

Article

Richard Colwell, James W. Pruett, Pamela Bristah, Richard J. Colwell and David G. Woods

the development of African American hymnody. By 1776 most African Americans had little if any first-hand experience of native African music, and thus their music became a combination of Protestant hymns and variations of African folk songs. Improvisation Watts’ hymns ( 1717 ) made them more popular than the chorales characteristic of pilgrim worship services. Slaves were able to procure instruments and become sufficiently proficient to be valued for entertaining at dances and parties of the white community. By 1723 , an African American trumpeter was listed in the

Article

Laurence Libin and Albert R. Rice

Quarterly , xvi/3 ( 1991 , 19–23); Music, Theater, Dance: an Illustrated Guide ( 1993 ); R. Hargrave: Amati, Stradivari & Guarneri: the Library of Congress Violins ( 1997 ). Washington, DC. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior: western art and traditional, ethnological, archaeological, esp. Native American. Washington, DC. Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of African Art: 119, mainly percussion. Washington, DC. Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History: c 5000 American and European art, traditional, jazz, and popular

Article

Imogen Fellinger, Julie Woodward, Dario Adamo, Silvia Arena, Robert Balchin, André Balog, Georgina Binns, Yael Bitrn, Zdravko Blažeković, Marco Capra, Leandro Donozo, Johan Eeckeloo, Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi, Veslemöy Heintz, Anne Ørbaek Jensen, Masakata Kanazawa, Simon Lancaster, Claus Røllum-Larsen, Lenita W.M. Nogueira, Jill Palmer, Ingrid Schubert, Martie Severt, John Shepard, Pamela Thompson and Chris Walton

Clubs of America], 542 [Music Educ. League] Tempo and Television AUS27 Tempo di jazz I322 Tempo e musica I309 Temporadas de la música E163 Tennessee Musician US655 Teostory FIN61 Termine A350 Tesoro musical de ilustración del Clero E71 Tesoro sacro musical E71 [Padres Misioneros Hijos del Corazón de María], 111 Teutonia D109 Texas Jazz US1063 Texas Music Educator US543 Texas String News US671 Thalia A8; S35 THD NL253 Theater NL58 Theater-Agenturen A34 Theater-Almanach CZ3 Theater-Courier D344 Theater der Zeit

Article

Raoul F. Camus

this article deals mainly with the history of such ensembles in the United States ( See also Circus Music ; Military music ; and Wind Ensemble .) In its more general sense, the term “band” is used to describe other vernacular ensembles, such as banjo, dance, jazz, jug, mummers, rock, steel, string, and theater bands. For information on such groups see Country music ; Folk music ; Jazz ; Pop ; and Rock . The terms “band” and “orchestra” were often used interchangeably in the past but have become increasingly distinct. Bands, descended from the medieval “high”

Article

Archives of Traditional Music, Folklore Institute, Indiana U. (Boston, 1975) C. J. Frisbie : Music and Dance Research of Southwestern United States Indians (Detroit, 1977) [lists recordings] Sibley Music Library Catalog of Sound Recordings , ed. Eastman School (Boston, 1977) G. Koch : Directory of Member Archives (London, 1978, 2/1982) [International Association of Sound Archives] E. A. Davis : Index to the New World Recorded Anthology of American Music (New York, 1981) Dictionary Catalog of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound (Boston

Article

Nicholas Temperley

French operas; after 1790 Germany too became a prime source. Exotic settings and characters also became as popular as aggressively British ones. Harems appeared as early as 1758 in Arne’s Sultan , a negro in Dibdin’s The Padlock ( 1768 ), West Indians in Arnold’s Inkle and Yarico ( 1787 ) and American Indians in Storace’s The Cherokee ( 1794 ). The same composer’s Haunted Tower ( 1789 ) brought Gothic horror, complete with ghost, to the English stage, along with a clearly Mozartian idiom. In 1802 melodrama was added to the growing multiplicity of genres