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Imogen Fellinger, Julie Woodward, Dario Adamo, Silvia Arena, Robert Balchin, André Balog, Georgina Binns, Yael Bitrn, Zdravko Blažeković, Marco Capra, Leandro Donozo, Johan Eeckeloo, Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi, Veslemöy Heintz, Anne Ørbaek Jensen, Masakata Kanazawa, Simon Lancaster, Claus Røllum-Larsen, Lenita W.M. Nogueira, Jill Palmer, Ingrid Schubert, Martie Severt, John Shepard, Pamela Thompson and Chris Walton

Clubs of America], 542 [Music Educ. League] Tempo and Television AUS27 Tempo di jazz I322 Tempo e musica I309 Temporadas de la música E163 Tennessee Musician US655 Teostory FIN61 Termine A350 Tesoro musical de ilustración del Clero E71 Tesoro sacro musical E71 [Padres Misioneros Hijos del Corazón de María], 111 Teutonia D109 Texas Jazz US1063 Texas Music Educator US543 Texas String News US671 Thalia A8; S35 THD NL253 Theater NL58 Theater-Agenturen A34 Theater-Almanach CZ3 Theater-Courier D344 Theater der Zeit

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Archives of Traditional Music, Folklore Institute, Indiana U. (Boston, 1975) C. J. Frisbie : Music and Dance Research of Southwestern United States Indians (Detroit, 1977) [lists recordings] Sibley Music Library Catalog of Sound Recordings , ed. Eastman School (Boston, 1977) G. Koch : Directory of Member Archives (London, 1978, 2/1982) [International Association of Sound Archives] E. A. Davis : Index to the New World Recorded Anthology of American Music (New York, 1981) Dictionary Catalog of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound (Boston

Article

Nicholas Temperley

French operas; after 1790 Germany too became a prime source. Exotic settings and characters also became as popular as aggressively British ones. Harems appeared as early as 1758 in Arne’s Sultan , a negro in Dibdin’s The Padlock ( 1768 ), West Indians in Arnold’s Inkle and Yarico ( 1787 ) and American Indians in Storace’s The Cherokee ( 1794 ). The same composer’s Haunted Tower ( 1789 ) brought Gothic horror, complete with ghost, to the English stage, along with a clearly Mozartian idiom. In 1802 melodrama was added to the growing multiplicity of genres