1-20 of 54 results  for:

  • All: American Indian Dance Theater x
  • Musical Concepts, Genres, and Terms x
Clear all

Article

Ralph P. Locke

Mabilat : Orientalism and Representations of Music in the Nineteenth-Century British Popular Arts (Aldershot, 2008) W.A. Sheppard : ‘Continuity in Composing the American Cross-Cultural: Eichheim, Cowell, and Japan’, JAMS , vol.61 (2008), 465–540 K. Yri : ‘Medievalism and Exoticism in the Music of Dead Can Dance’, CMc , no.85 (2008), 53–72 I. van Rij : ‘“There Is No Anachronism”: Indian Dancing Girls in Ancient Carthage in Berlioz’s Les Troyens’, 19CM , vol.33 (2008–9), 3–24 N. Al-Taee : ‘Under the Spell of Magic: the Oriental Tale in Rimsky-Korsakov’s

Article

Ralph P. Locke

française , no.6 (1981) R. Fiske : Scotland in Music: a European Enthusiasm (Cambridge, 1983) R. Savage : ‘Rameau’s American Dancers’, EMc , 11 (1983), 441–52 J. Maehder , ed.: Esotismo e colore locale nell’opera di Puccini (Pisa, 1985) B. Nettl : The Western Impact on World Music: Change, Adaptation, and Survival (New York, 1985), 68–71, 84–90 I. Guest , ed.: Gautier on Dance (London, 1986), 36–50, 134–7 [reviews of Indian dancers, 1838, 1844] J.-J. Nattiez , ed. P. Boulez : Orientations: Collected Writings (Cambridge, 1986), 161–2, 339–41, 422–4

Article

Judith Tick, Margaret Ericson and Ellen Koskoff

and Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective , ed. E. Koskoff (Westport, CT, 1987), 203–12 J. Vander : Songprints: the Musical Experience of Five Shoshone Women (Urbana, IL, 1988) R. Keeling , ed.: Women in North American Indian Music (Bloomington, IN, 1989) [incl. B.D. Cavanagh: ‘Music and Gender in the Sub-Arctic Algonkian Area’, American Indian Music , 55–66; C. Frisbie: ‘Gender and Navajo Music: Unanswered Questions’, 22–38; O.T. Hatton: ‘Gender and Musical Style in Gros Ventre War Expedition songs’, 39–54; R. Keeling: ‘Musical Evidence of Female Spiritual

Article

Music  

Bruno Nettl

times encompassed music and dance (somewhat like the Chinese terminology) but which later came to mean something like ‘music’. In modern usage, it is the Indian vernacular word closest to ‘music’ but (being closer perhaps to Tonkunst ) refers, most specifically, to classical or art music. The word gita or git in combination with other words designates different genres of music, but particularly of song, such as filmi git (film music or film songs) and lok git (folk or people’s songs). Complex taxonomies are characteristic of Indian philosophy and cosmology.

Article

J. Peter Burkholder

as the American national anthem The Star-Spangled Banner ( 1814 ), with new words by Francis Scott Key to John Stafford Smith's tune for the English drinking-song To Anacreon in Heaven ( c 1775 ). German street songs were often adaptations of melodies from popular marches, dances or songs from operettas or Singspiele, with new, usually sentimental or humorous words ( see Gassenhauer ). Melodies of 19th-century American popular songs and hymns are often related, as if a songwriter began with a fragment of a familiar tune and extended it. Thus the American Civil

Article

Philip Brett and Elizabeth Wood

such as the even faster and louder House music of the 1980s, and later Acid and Techno, developed as Disco moved into the straight mainstream. In the 1990s gay dance music was strongly affected by the artistry of RuPaul, possibly the recording industry's most successful drag queen. Like rock and roll before them, Disco and House were heavily derived from black performing styles and sounds, the African-American diva from Grace Jones to RuPaul being as important here as in the opera house. They momentarily displaced racial tensions to create an idealized arena for queer

Article

Peter Kleiner, E.P. Skone James, Gavin McFarlane and Melville B. Nimmer

association, the same year as the Performing Right Society was founded in Britain. A performing right gave a collecting society in America enormous scope, for although the territory was large communications were good, and the population was spread much more evenly than in Australia and Canada, so that collection in the larger towns was practical. As various types of popular music spread across the country, there were countless performances in dance halls and clubs, restaurants and cafés which had previously been beyond the control of an individual right-owner but which a

Article

Lydia Goehr, F.E. Sparshott, Andrew Bowie and Stephen Davies

simple psychological components by a strict causal necessity. Such writers as Mattheson ( 1739 ) offer elaborate analyses of the emotions along these lines, with detailed specifications of the corresponding musical devices. The resulting emotive packages are mediated by dance forms, since in a dance a complete musical complex, often with ethnic and hence ethical connotations, is already wedded to gesture and thus as it were integrated into a way of life. On examination, the mediation proves somewhat programmatic: the musical specifications could be at best sketchily

Article

Krin Gabbard

s between two phenomena that have both been called jazz dance. The term has been so successfully expropriated by the musical theater that, in her book Steppin’ on the Blues ( 1996 ), Jacqui Malone regularly uses the phrases “African American Vernacular Dance” or “classic jazz dance” to identify her subject. Malone has followed Marshall and Jean Stearns in using the term “modern jazz dance” to describe the Broadway/Hollywood tradition. Regardless of what we may choose to call jazz dance, the role of dance within the history of jazz should not be overlooked. Major’s

Article

avant-garde performances of dance, theater, and music, including jazz. Ornette Coleman first recorded for its label, Caravan of Dreams Productions, in 1985 . It also presented jazz in mainstream styles, with Herbie Hancock, Stanley Turrentine, Carmen McRae, Billy Eckstine, and Grover Washington, Jr., among those who appeared there. (< http://www.caravanofdreams.com > ( 2001 )) Frederick, MD Dancing Pavilion [Waltz Dream]. 400 block of West Patrick Street. In 1930–31 it hosted weekly dances featuring mainly locally based African-American bands, including Ike Dixon’s

Article

Costume  

Sidney Jackson Jowers

y dress. Baroque operas included many balletic interludes and divertissements to amuse the audience and give the singers a rest. Menestrier recommends that in each scene the dancers should be dressed alike, and that they should not appear twice in the same costume. He suggests successive entrées of soldiers, shepherds, gods from ancient legend, thieves, animals, genii, American Indians, Persians and Moors. The expense of such a quantity of costumes could not be borne by individual performers, so managements paid for opera-ballet clothing (unlike the system in French

Article

Roger Savage, Barry Millington and John Cox

Dressed: Eighteenth Century Acting’, Proceedings of the Modern Language Association of America , 58 (1943), 1002–37 B. Brunelli , ed.: P. Metastasio: Tutte le opere (Milan, 1943–54) C. Varese : Saggio sul Metastasio (Florence, 1950) [esp. appx, ‘La regia dal dramma Metastasiano’, 103–12] T. Cole and H. Krich Chinoy eds.: Directing the Play: a Sourcebook of Stagecraft (Indianapolis, in , 1953, 2/1963, as Directors on Directing: a Sourcebook of the Modern Theater, with an Illustrated History of Directing ) [incl. H. Krich Chinoy : ‘The Emergence of

Article

Richard Middleton and Peter Manuel

tango, Turkish arabesk , Indonesian dangdut and mainstream Egyptian and Indian popular music ( see India, subcontinent of §VIII 1. ). In most cases, star singers were thus obliged to act (and often dance) as well, although in the 1940s Indian films adopted the ‘playback’ system, in which actors would mouth words in ‘lip-sync’ to songs separately recorded by professional singers. Meanwhile, film-related musics were marketed independently as phonograms. In some regions, such as Latin America and the Near East, television came to largely replace cinematic musicals

Article

Tilman Seebass

resist depiction since their main feature is a process in time. By contrast, dance types consisting of a series of positions lend themselves easily to depiction, since each position captures the essence of the meaning of the choreutic moment. Such dances are found in the courtly milieu in Asia and in the European ballet. Some Asian dance cultures – probably as a result of the cultivation of dance drama – have equated dance positions with emotions and thoughts. The most prominent example is the Indian rasa system, precisely described emotions formalized in positions of

Article

Matt Glaser, Alyn Shipton and Anthony Barnett

materially altered some aspects of playing, and, just as with the guitar, modern amplification has made different stopping and plucking techniques both audible and useable. Among African-American musicians the violin was a significant component of music on plantations, both in accompanying dance and as part of string bands which played for white slave-owners and African-American communities alike. A high level of virtuosity was achieved by such concert artists as John Thomas Douglass ( 1847–1886 ) and Walter Craig ( 1854–192 ?), and it is reasonable to assume that

Article

Song  

Geoffrey Chew, Thomas J. Mathiesen, Thomas B. Payne and David Fallows

MO, 1959) A.J. Sabol , ed.: Songs and Dances for the Stuart Masque (Providence, RI, 1959) W. Salmen : ‘European Song (1300–1530)’, NOHM , 3 (1960), 349–80 Chanson & Madrigal 1480–1530: Cambridge , MA , 1961 J. Stevens : Music & Poetry in the Early Tudor Court (London, 1961, repr. with corrections 1979) A. Verchaly , ed.: Airs de court pour voix et luth (1603–1643) (Paris, 1961) P. Brett : ‘The English Consort Song, 1570–1625’, PRMA , 88 (1961–2), 73–88 H.M. Brown : Music in the French Secular Theater, 1400–1550 (Cambridge, MA, 1963) F.W. Sternfeld

Article

Richard Taruskin

shown to be the remains of an unrealized project to compose an opera or oratorio on the subject of Longfellow’s Hiawatha , was intended as a Herderian object lesson to the Americans on how they might achieve a distinctive ‘school’ of composition. As quoted by the critic Henry Krehbiel, Dvořák urged that they submit the indigenous musics of their country, namely native-American (‘American Indian’) melodies and ‘plantation songs’ (alias ‘Negro spirituals’), ‘to beautiful treatment in the higher forms of art’. But of course higher forms that would justify and canonize

Article

Mervyn Cooke

Outside Europe few countries initially escaped the influence of Hollywood productions, and early film-making in Latin America, Australia and North Africa produced pale imitations of American genres, chiefly westerns. Early Chinese cinema was partly backed by American funding, while Indian silent films were monopolized by the British. From the advent of sound in 1931 , Indian cinema has consistently employed elements of traditional song and dance as a commercial attraction, even in violent action films, and synthetic styles blending Asian and Western techniques became

Article

Nicholas Temperley

naturally, much less successful in the face of the ancient, developed religions of the region. In the Indian subcontinent the Methodists formed unions with other Protestant churches to form the Church of South India ( 1947 ) and similarly united churches in North India and Ceylon. American Methodists have also undertaken worldwide missions, concentrating their efforts more especially among Amerindians and in Latin America: the MEC Missionary Society was set up in 1819 . American Methodist missions have been extensive in East Asia, with a particularly notable thrust in China

Article

Ballad  

James Porter, Jeremy Barlow, Graham Johnson, Eric Sams and Nicholas Temperley

(from Lat. ballare : ‘to dance’ ) Term used for a short popular or traditional song that normally frames a narrative element. Scholars of the term’s history and origin take it to signify a relatively concise composition known throughout Europe since the late Middle Ages, spreading later to the New World, notably the Americas: it combines narrative, dramatic dialogue and lyrical passages in strophic form sung to a rounded tune, and often includes a recurrent refrain. Performance is predominantly by solo singers, though choral and dance elements are known in some