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Article

Jane M. Bowers

Chédeville, there were two other brothers, Jacques and Louis, who were not musicians, and four sisters. Pierre went to Paris with his brother Esprit Philippe at an early age, and in 1709 both entered the opera orchestra as musette players; they were probably under the supervision of their great-uncles Louis and Nicolas [Colin] Hotteterre, for they were listed at the opera under the name Hotteterre rather than Chédeville. In January 1714 Pierre acquired the reversion of Louis’s place in the Grands Hautbois and seems to have taken the post over officially on Louis's death

Article

O.W. Neighbour and Susi Jeans

kind to include all twelve possible transpositions of the hexachord. It is unusual among Bull’s compositions in giving scope to the side of his mentality that enjoyed constructing complex canons. Bull’s keyboard music forms by far the most important and extensive part of his output. A comprehensive assessment of it is difficult, however, for although most of the more substantial pieces from his English years are securely attributed to him, scarcely any of the sources are entirely trustworty in their ascriptions. Indeed, the most important source of all ( F-Pn Rés.

Article

Tula Giannini

to 1694 he had his own workshop on the rue des Lombards, moving to the rue des Ecrivains and then to the rue Marmousets ( 1709 ). Du Pradel listed him in 1692 as a maker of all types of woodwind instruments. (9) Jean Hotteterre (iv) [ le jeune ] ( b La Couture , Feb 13, 1646 ; d Paris , Feb 20, 1732 ). Son of Louis Hotteterre (i). In the 1670s he played for Lully's operas Atys and Isis at St Germain-en-Laye. He obtained the position of ‘basse de hautbois et taille de violon’ in the grande écurie on the death of his cousin Jean Hotteterre

Article

Roslyn Rensch

Jacques-Georges Cousineau ( b Paris, 13 Jan 1760 ; d Paris, 11 Jan 1836 ) joined the business, and the title of Luthier-in-Ordinary to the Queen was given them both. Jacques-Georges published his first harp music in 1780 . From about 1780 to 1811 he was harpist at the Paris Opéra; he was a soloist at the Concert Spirituel in 1781 and became harpist to Empress Josephine in 1804 . Cousineau catalogues of the period list harp solos, ensemble music and methods composed or arranged by the Cousineaus and others. Now best remembered for their single-action pedal

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Ugo Ravasio

as a maker in Brescia was taken over by his pupil Maggini, Gio(vanni) Paolo , and his trade was also continued by his son Francesco until at least 1615 . Bibliography G. Livi : I liutai bresciani (Milan, 1896) A.M. Mucchi : Gasparo da Salò: la vita e l'opera, 1540–1609 (Milan, 1940) F. Dassenno and U. Ravasio : Gasparo da Salò e la liuteria bresciana tra Rinascimento e Barocco (Brescia, 1990) U. Ravasio : ‘Vecchio e nuovo nella ricerca documentaria su Gasparo da Salò e la liuteria bresciana’, Liuteria e musica strumentale a

Article

, 1915): music to have been by Ravel, Satie, Schmitt, Stravinsky and Varèse; only Satie’s Cinq grimaces composed Parade (ballet, 1916–17): music by Satie, Paris, 1917 Le boeuf sur le toit ou ‘The Nothing Doing Bar’ (ballet, 1920): music by Milhaud, Paris, 1920 Paul et Virginie (opéra comique, 1920, collab. Radiguet): music to have been by Satie Les mariés de la tour Eiffel (play-ballet, 1920–21): music by Auric, Honegger, Milhaud, Poulenc and Tailleferre, Paris, 1921 Le gendarme incompris (play, 1921, collab. Radiguet): music by Poulenc, Paris, 1921 Antigone

Article

Robert E. Eliason

musical-society, and theater concerts, Italian opera, traveling virtuosos, minstrel shows, popular songs, dancing, traveling concert troupes, circuses, brass bands, and many others. All types of musical instrument maker flourished, especially those making brass instruments, reed organs, and pianos. During the early part of this period American players and manufacturers of flutes sorted out the advantages and disadvantages of three types of flute: the simple eight-key instrument, Abel Siccama’s diatonic model, and the Boehm flute. All three were made by American makers and

Article

Ann Griffiths and Richard Macnutt

that has come to light ( c 1795 ) lists about 320 publications, of which more than 200 are for harp or piano in various combinations; most of the remainder are for violin, wind instruments or wind band. Between 1791 and 1799 Naderman published orchestral scores of at least eight operas, including Cherubini’s Lodoïska , Le Sueur’s La caverne ( see Jean-François Le Sueur , fig. ) and Steibelt’s Roméo et Juliette . These were, however, to remain his most substantial publications, and it was chamber music, especially for harp, that continued to predominate in his

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Philip J. Kass and Duane Rosengard

1773 until May 1777 Cozio was Guadagnini’s exclusive patron, supplying the wood and acquiring virtually all of his production – at least 50 violins, two violas and two or three cellos. Guadagnini continued to repair and sell violins for Cozio after their contract lapsed. In 1775–6 Cozio bought the collection of Antonio Stradivari's violins and workshop relics belonging to the master's son Paolo, Guadagnini acting as intermediary. The violins were almost all modernized by Guadagnini and, perhaps, they inspired the radical changes that Guadagnini introduced to the

Article

Howard Mayer Brown

revised by Giulio Ongaro

treatises, one on the recorder, Opera intitulata Fontegara (Venice, 1535 ), and one in two volumes on the viola da gamba, Regola rubertina (Venice, 1542 ) and Lettione seconda (Venice, 1543 ). Most 16th-century books on instruments are either quasi-encyclopedic surveys, like those by Sebastian Virdung ( 1511 ) and Martin Agricola ( 1528 and later), or else very simple sets of instructions for tuning, fingering and intabulating, like the lutebooks by Hans Gerle ( 1532 and later) and Adrian Le Roy ( 1574 ). Ganassi’s works differ from all others in their detail and

Article

D.J. Blaikley

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

separate music side of the business was started in 1816 under the control of the founder's son, Thomas (ii) ( 1794/5–1871 ). They began as importers of foreign music, but soon became the English publishers of composers such as Hummel, Mercadante and Rossini, and later of important operas by Bellini, Donizetti and Verdi. The House of Lords' decision in 1854 , which deprived English publishers of many of their foreign copyrights, severely affected the firm. Among the earliest publications of T. Boosey & Co. was an English translation of Forkel's life of Bach ( 1820

Article

W.H. Husk

revised by Margaret Cranmer, Peter Ward Jones and Kenneth R. Snell

Clara Schumann. Thomas Chappell also organized the later seasons of Dickens’s public readings from 1866 to 1870 . In the 1870s the firm’s association with Gilbert and Sullivan began. In addition to publishing nearly all their operas, Thomas Chappell financed the Comedy Opera Company, which performed the works before D’Oyly Carte took over the operas in 1877 . Thomas Chappell was also one of the original directors of the RCM, and a governor of the Royal Albert Hall. The firm’s fortunes declined temporarily at the end of the 19th century, and in 1894 William Boosey

Article

Alexander Pilipczuk

a pupil of Michael Mietke. He is first mentioned in 1722 in the register of citizens of Hamburg. On 1 September that year he married the widow of the instrument maker Carl Conrad(t) Fleischer ( 1680–1721 /2), whose workshop near the old Gänsemarkt opera house he took over. There were three children of the marriage, all with godparents from Hamburg families of musicians. Christian Zell is thought not to have been related to the painter and draughtsman Gottfried Zell, active in Hamburg 1788–90 . Three surviving Zell harpsichords are known: one dated 1728 , in the

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

and vast quantities of popular dance and vocal music continued to be issued up to the 1860s. As instrument makers, the firm was known especially for wind instruments (James Wood was a skilled woodwind maker) and for pianos, of which all types were made, except apparently full concert grands. String instruments bearing the firm's name all appear to have been bought in and were commonly of French or German origin. After the demise of the publishing business, Joseph Emery bought the name and goodwill, and Thomas D'Almaine & Co. continued to exist as piano (and for some

Article

Philip Bate

revised by Geoffrey Burgess

Frédéric Triébert ( b Paris , May 8, 1813 ; d Paris , March 19, 1878 ). Second son of (1) Guillaume Triébert. He did not at first take up music, but studied metal engraving with Lecoq from 1826 to 1830 . He then followed his brother as an oboist, becoming second oboe at the Opéra-Comique in 1839 . About 1846 he gave up professional playing to assist in running the family firm, and took over the management on his father’s death. Frédéric’s compositions include two works for oboe and piano, Air pastoral and L’Illusion valse ; he also composed songs on texts

Article

Erard  

Ann Griffiths and Richard Macnutt

and 1805 the firm published full scores of eight operas, including Spontini’s Milton and Julie , and others by Boieldieu, Dalayrac and Plantade. These were followed in 1807 and 1809 by Spontini’s La vestale and Fernand Cortez , the firm’s most important publications; thereafter their output seems to have diminished greatly. They concentrated on instrumental music, making only occasional operatic excursions, for example Spontini’s Olimpie , a revised edition of Fernand Cortez and Hérold’s L’illusion . All the firm’s publications were engraved.

Article

Charles Beare, Arthur F. Hill, Jaak Liivoja-Lorius and Christina Bashford

His instruments were of all qualities; he was capable of refined and elegant workmanship, though more often there are signs of haste. The cellos are made on a good pattern with ample air-space, and have been praised. Of Joseph Hill’s five sons the elder two were quite well known as violin makers. William Hill ( 1745–90 ), no doubt after assisting his father, opened his own shop in Poland Street and largely followed his father’s patterns. By contrast, the first Lockey Hill ( 1756–1810 ) was a prolific maker mostly of inferior instruments, all rather scooped towards the

Article

Rita Benton

assumption is strengthened by the manner in which the narrative favours Pleyel, always emphasizing the closeness of his relationship with Haydn and the master’s affection and esteem for him. During this period Pleyel’s puppet opera Die Fee Urgele was first performed at Eszterháza ( November 1776 ), and at the Vienna Nationaltheater. Haydn’s puppet opera Das abgebrannte Haus , or Die Feuersbrunst , was also first performed in 1776 or 1777 , with an overture (or at least its first two movements) now generally accepted as being by Pleyel. Pleyel’s first position seems

Article

Kurt von Fischer

revised by Gianluca D’Agostino

more have the superius and tenor texted, a pattern that made its first appearance in the works of Landini; six have all voices texted, in the Italian manner). 12 of these 18 works are in French mensurations (eight in 6/8 and four in 9/8). Verto and chiuso endings occur in 31 pieces (often cadencing on D, E, D), including all the pieces with text in the superius alone; whereas this double ending is hardly ever found among the works with text in all voices and in those with two parts texted. French influence can also be suspected wherever in place of smooth flowing

Article

Svetlana Savenko, Enrique Alberto Arias, Christopher Palmer, Barry Schrader and Joel Chadabe

Morevna . Although he wrote in virtually all genres, he achieved greatest popularity with his vocal miniatures and ballets. His sacred works, which include an oratorio, remain little known. As a teacher, Tcherepnin was noteworthy for his outstanding erudition and sensitivity towards new tendencies, and for this reason he was conspicuous among the predominantly conservative staff of the St Petersburg Conservatory. During his years of emigration he was a uniquely consolidating figure for Russian musicians. Works Operas Svat [The Matchmaker]