1-20 of 21 results  for:

  • All: Opera for all x
  • Composer or Arranger x
  • Instrumentalist x
Clear all

Article

Harold E. Samuel

eight parts ( 1642–9 ) contains 300 works, nine of which include either music or instructions for music, apparently all by Staden. Seelewig is the only one that is through-composed. It is designated as ‘in the Italian manner’ and is modelled on the school dramas of the 16th and 17th centuries ( fig.2 ). The recitatives lack the freedom of their Italian counterparts, and the emphasis on strophic songs, a trait still common in J.P. Krieger's operas 50 years later, retards the dramatic movement. The music in the other eight Gesprächspiele consists of one or more

Article

Imogene Horsley

revised by David Nutter

Cerreto’s other extant publications, Il primo libro di canzonelle a tre voci (Naples, 1606 ) and L’Amarillide a tre voci con alcuni a due soprani, Il terzo libro, Opera 18 (Naples, 1621 ). Works now lost mentioned by the composer in his theoretical writings or in various catalogues include at least four books of spiritual madrigals for four voices and three books of madrigals for five voices, all printed before 1601 ; a book of two-voice ricercares ( 1604 ); a volume of madrigals for two voices ‘sopra madrigali d’Arcadelt’ (before 1616 ); a book of ‘Canoni

Article

Nicholas Tawa

Master of Arts in music from Harvard University, the first such degree granted by an American University. While still an adolescent, he had discovered Schumann’s piano music. A respect for Wagner’s operas began with a visit to Bayreuth in 1876. However, Wagner was never a strong influence on Foote’s own style. Beethoven, he treasured. He stated, “It seemed natural to have all . . . [the Beethoven] symphonies in one season of the symphony concerts.” Foote also cherished Brahms’s compositions. When he became elderly, he acquainted himself with the innovations of composers

Article

Stephan D. Lindeman and George Barth

W.S. Newman : ‘About Czerny's op.600 and the “First” Description of “Sonata Form”’, JAMS , 20 (1967), 513–15 P. Badura-Skoda , ed.: Carl Czerny. On the Proper Performance of all Beethoven's Works for the Piano , with excerpts from Czerny's Memoirs and Anecdotes and Notes about Beethoven (Vienna, 1970) C. Suttoni : Piano and Opera: a Study of the Piano Fantasies written on Opera Themes in the Romantic Era (Ann Arbor, 1974) M.S. Cole : ‘Czerny's Illustrated Description of the Rondo or Finale’, MR , 36 (1975), 5–16 A.L. Mitchell , ed., with Introduction

Article

1721 he returned to Brunswick, where he composed his first Italian opera, L’innocenza difesa ; there too he refused an offer, repeated in 1722 , of a post as court musician in the service of the Duke of Brunswick. At the end of the year he accepted the King of Sweden’s invitation to become Kapellmeister at his court, but he had resigned by Easter 1725 because he was not given a promised appointment as court organist. In Sweden he wrote several occasional works for the court; an Italian opera, Arminio , is either lost or (according to Mattheson) was never completed

Article

Enrico Careri

English edition of the Pièces de clavecin and numerous reprintings of earlier works, he had the op.5 cello sonatas in hand and a new collection of concerti grossi, op.7. On 9 February 1745 Geminiani directed, at the New Theatre in Haymarket, L'incostanza delusa , a pasticcio opera which was not a success with the public. Between the acts he performed his new concerti grossi, which were published the following year as op.7. The engraving of the concertos and the op.5 cello sonatas was carried out in the Netherlands, where Geminiani went in 1746 . The two new

Article

Péter P. Várnai

‘Hat írás Bartókról’ [Six papers on Bartók], Magyar zene , 27 (1986), 69–84 ed. J. Demény : Boethius boldog fiatalsága [Boethius's happy youth] (Budapest, 1989) ed. F. Bónis : ‘Egy autor nyilatkozik’ [One author makes a statement], ‘Elöljáró az opera esztétikájához’ [Introduction to the aesthetics of opera], Magyar zene , 32 (1991), 52–80, 81–90 Bibliography M.D. Calvocoressi : ‘Hungarian Music of Today’, MMR , 52 (1922), 30–32 J.S. Weissmann : ‘The Contemporary Movement in Hungary’, Music Today , 1 (1949), 81–96 Articles on Molnár’s

Article

George J. Buelow

tribute to his musicianship and his erudition, claimed never to have known his like as composer, organist, chorus director and scholar. 2. Works. Kuhnau's surviving music belongs to two categories: keyboard music, nearly all published by 1700 , and sacred music, mostly cantatas and all of it unpublished. His secular vocal works are all lost. His reputation as a composer rests almost entirely on the four printed sets of keyboard pieces, especially the last of them, the Biblische Historien . This consists of six multi-movement ‘sonatas’, each prefaced by a prose

Article

Dina Zanetti Masiello

revised by Claudio Toscani

the Société des Musicologues Français. As a Jew, he was forced by the racial laws to give up all his public posts in 1939 . A meticulous scholar, Boghen worked mainly with early music. He made editions of old French songs, piano arrangements of pieces by Bach, Liszt, Marcello, Clementi, Frescobaldi, Domenico Scarlatti and Bernardo Pasquini, as well as arrangements for violin and piano of pieces by Tartini, Nardini and Veracini. His compositions include an unperformed opera Alceste , held in high regard by Sgambati and others, vocal and chamber works and many piano

Article

Robert N. Freeman

by Emperor Joseph II during the suppression of the Austrian monasteries, Stadler was appointed abbot of Lilienfeld in April 1786 . In Kremsmünster, where he held the same post from May 1789 , his administration was marked by his support of secular music, including performances of operas by Paisiello, Salieri and Umlauf. He moved to Linz in January 1791 , acted as consistorial adviser to the bishop and was awarded an annual pension of 1000 florins from Kremsmünster for the next 12 years. In 1796 he settled in Vienna, was secularized in 1803 and received the

Article

Ned Quist

revised by Linda L. Giedl

three years of intensive work, he submitted his doctoral dissertation (Die italienische Sonate für mehrere Instrumente im 17ten Jahrhundert, diss., U. of Heidelberg, 1932 ). Later that year he was engaged as a coach and conducting assistant to Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt at the Darmstadt Opera. Beaten with guns by Adolf Hitler’s Stormtroopers in early 1933 , Schlossberg left Germany for Paris. Taking the name Jean Berger in 1934 , he became a sought-after concert accompanist and vocal coach, founded and conducted a small chorus (Les Compagnons de la Marjolaine) and a

Article

Giselher Schubert

some of the best conductors of the day, among them Willem Mengelberg, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Fritz Busch and Hermann Scherchen, men who would later champion his compositions. The principal conductor, Ludwig Rottenberg, conducted the German premières of operas by Debussy, Dukas and Bartók and promoted Schreker’s operas above all. (Hindemith married his youngest daughter, Gertrud, in 1924 .) In 1915 Hindemith became the second violinist in Rebner’s string quartet. He also appeared as a violin soloist playing concertos by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. In 1923

Article

authority on early music. He was an important contributor to the first edition of Grove's Dictionary . His compositions, conservative in style, include numerous operatic fantasias, short piano pieces, and songs, including the once popular Queen and huntress . His piano arrangements of operas in Boosey & Co.'s series The Standard Lyric Drama ( 1847–52 ) made the works available to a wide public. Writings only those on music A History of Music for the Use of Young Students (London, 1879, 3/ c 1890) A Key to Practical Harmony (London, 1881) Practical Harmony: a Manual

Article

Pierluigi Petrobelli

sonatas published in Rome as op.2 in 1745 , who came to Padua (as Tartini himself stated in the dedication) all the way from Java; Bernard Schelff, from Arolsen in Germany (a student in 1740–41 ); the Frenchmen André Noel Pagin (a student before 1748 ), Pierre Lahoussaye and Joseph Touchemoulin; and Pietro Nardini from Livorno, the most illustrious and original of them all as a composer. J.G. Naumann from Dresden, later active in Stockholm as Kapellmeister and opera composer, also studied and corresponded with Tartini. Of his many other pupils we know little more than

Article

Trena Jordanoska

of Belgrade (MA in composition, 1976 ); he defended his doctoral dissertation on the aesthetics of music at UKIM Faculty of Philosophy in 1984 . He has twice been a Fulbright Scholar in the USA ( 1985–6 and 1999–2000 ). His catalogue includes symphonies, concertos, oratorios, operas, ballets, song cycles, and sonatas for different instruments. He defines his compositional approach as polystylistic: using mainly multi-movement orchestral forms in the manner of the European music tradition from the 17th century to the 20th and incorporating elements of folk, jazz

Article

Margaret Grave

Lampedo ( 1779 ), he explored a language of musical pantomime and dramatic gesture, while the opera Castore e Polluce ( 1787 ), replete with choral tableaux, dances and arioso as well as virtuoso arias, represents a synthesis of Italian and French operatic tradition. By contrast, the Swedish opera Gustaf Adolph och Ebba Brahe ( 1788 ) forgoes elaborate arias and static tableaux in favour of syllabically rendered dialogue and a fast pace of dramatic action. The late Viennese opera Samori ( 1804 ), uniquely rich in melodic, harmonic and instrumental diversity, features

Article

Malcolm Gillies

fifth door, to Bluebeard’s kingdom, after which Judith’s jealousy becomes obsessive, leading to her eventual entombment, along with all Bluebeard’s previous wives, and eternal darkness. Bartók’s work changed the course of Hungarian opera by successfully developing a fluid form of Hungarian declamation of Balázs’s ballad-like text, based largely upon the inflections of parlando rubato folksong. He also managed to characterize the protagonists modally: Bluebeard through smooth, pentatonic lines; Judith through more chromatic and angular writing. Bartók’s operatic conception

Article

Keith Moore

incorporating a rock group and requiring three conductors. From 1976 he focussed on assimilating the entire American musical tradition, including hymn tunes, marches and ragtime, and with Americana, or, A New Tale of the Genii he began his most ambitious project yet: a cycle of three operas, each encompassing a century of America’s musical heritage. Later works such as Arabesques Redux and The Blue Box use modes taken from jazz and non-Western traditional musics. Works ( selective list ) Dramatic Pyramus and Thisbe (chbr

Article

Michael Tilmouth

However, the Edinburgh public took comparatively little notice of the opportunities he created for such artists to be heard. Tovey had composed prolifically during his Oxford days and in the years immediately following, but after 1918 the only major works he produced were the opera The Bride of Dionysus , which had occupied him since 1907 and was eventually performed in 1929 , and the Cello Concerto of 1935 for Casals. He was knighted in 1935 . Tovey was a brilliant conversationalist, something that gained him many distinguished friends. But he could

Article

Gerald R. Benjamin

composers and thought that the development of the ‘13th sound’ revolution would in itself be sufficient to give universal renown to Mexico. Out of it would result a new order, less complex though providing for complexity, less constrained though providing for restraint. Works Operas Without microtones La princesse Oïna (Ossian) (1, H. Albert), 1902 México en 1810 (Matilde) (4, L. Viramontes), 1909 Xulitl (3, C. d’Erzel), 1921, rev. 1947 Orchestral With microtones Sym. no.1 ‘Colombia’, c 1926 Serenata, ¼-tone vc, orch, 1926 Sym. no