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Article

Horace Fitzpatrick

revised by Thomas Hiebert

double concerto at the Concert Spirituel; this was the first of at least eight appearances there by Domnich between 1785 and 1788 . In the latter year he played a solo concerto by Devienne, but he otherwise appeared mainly in duos and trios with Lebrun. By 1787 he had joined the Opéra orchestra as Lebrun’s second, in 1793 he entered the National Guard band and by 1799 he was second horn at the Théâtre Feydeou. Domnich, along with Duvernoy, Buch and Kenn, was appointed professor of the horn at the newly formed Paris Conservatoire in 1795 . He was professor of

Article

Leon Plantinga

revised by Luca Lévi Sala

pianists at all levels. Thus in several ways he impressed his stamp on piano playing and writing from about 1790 until far into the 19th century. And increasing numbers of modern editions and recordings of his works made 20th-century musicians and audiences aware once more of his virtues as a composer. Workslist for more detailed information on sources, see Tyson (1967) and the Clementi Critical Edition (CCE, 2008—); opus numbers are those of the most authentic editions, as determined by Tyson and updated in the new catalogue [CCE xv] (sn – senza numero d’opera; wo – without

Article

Roger J.V. Cotte

depleted estate, and has since been untraced. Several portraits of Bagge are known, one of them engraved by Nicolas Cochin (reproduced in Terry) and another portraying him with a violin ‘comme un ménétrier’. Works all printed works published in Paris Orchestral 3 sinfonie (1788) 4 vn concs., all (n.d.) vn conc., F-Pn ; 2 symphonies concertantes, D-B Chamber 6 quatuors concertants, str qt, op.1 (1773) 6 trio, 2 vn, b (n.d.) Airs de Marlborough variés

Article

Edward R. Reilly

revised by Andreas Giger

greatest influence on his development as a performer and composer. His interest in composition, particularly in works for the flute, continued to grow, stimulated by a wide range of Italian and French works then performed in Dresden. In the Saxon court’s repertory, however, influenced by opera seria and the instrumental compositions of Corelli, Torelli and Vivaldi, the Italian musical style gradually superseded the French. Between 1724 and 1727 Quantz completed his training with a period of study in Italy and shorter stays in France and England. He studied counterpoint