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Article

Decca  

Maureen Fortey

Arnold Östman in Mozart operas, all using period instruments and techniques. Other important issues include the recording of Haydn's complete symphonies by the Philharmonia Hungarica under Antal Dorati, in the early 1970s, and several operas with Joan Sutherland in leading roles, chiefly conducted by Richard Bonynge. In the 1990s Decca issued the ‘Entartete Musik’ series, of supposedly ‘decadent’ music banned under the Nazis. The company's roster of artists during the last decades of the 20th century included Vladimir Ashkenazy, Riccardo Chailly, Luciano Pavarotti,

Article

EMI  

Peter Martland

first Society set was of Hugo Wolf songs, by Elena Gerhardt. It was in the Society series that Artur Schnabel recorded Beethoven's complete solo piano works. Legge's colleague David Bicknell broke new ground with a series of Mozart opera recordings from the new Glyndebourne opera house. Gaisberg remained active and made a series of complete opera recordings with Beniamino Gigli; he also made records of Elgar conducting his own works, among them the 1932 collaboration between Elgar and the 16-year-old violinist Yehudi Menuhin in his Violin Concerto, one of the 20th century's

Article

Daniel Zager

librarians in three ways. Most common is the firm order, where a specific publication is ordered by the librarian. A second is standing (or continuation) orders, in which the dealer is instructed to send all new items within a specific set or series, such as a composer collected edition or a national historic series. Or, in the realm of recordings, parameters may include all new issues of a particular label. The third is the approval plan, conceptually similar to a standing order but on an expanded basis and with the privilege of returning unwanted items to the dealer. The

Article

Carli  

Richard Macnutt

including five by Paer and, in the 1820s, no fewer than 19 by Rossini. In 1823 a prospectus was issued for an edition of several Rossini operas in full score, but nothing came of this. Among Carli’s instrumental publications (again mainly by Italian composers) were numerous works for guitar by Carulli. The firm used a series of plate numbers (apparently chronological) that suggest that about 2500 publications were issued (all from engraved plates). There was evidently a close link with Richault, for each occasionally issued the other’s publications with the substitution

Article

Richard Macnutt

publications, almost all in lithography, mainly of excerpts from contemporary operas. It is best remembered, however, for the enterprising series of complete full scores of eight Rossini operas: Mosè in Egitto ( c 1825 ), L'inganno felice and Semiramide ( c 1826 ), Il barbiere di Siviglia ( c 1827 ), Ricciardo e Zoraide ( c 1828 ), L'assedio di Corinto ( c 1830 ), Matilde di Shabran ( c 1832 ) and Guillaume Tell ( c 1835 ). Although Rossini probably did not supervise their preparation, they were the first full scores of his operas to appear in Italy (five

Article

Ricordi  

Richard Macnutt

five operas and the Requiem are already issued ( 1997 ). Ricordi has also launched a Rossini edition, again under Gossett, of which eleven operas and five other works are in print, and a Donizetti edition, under Gabriele Dotto and Roger Parker, of which the first volume appeared in 1991 . All three editions are published jointly with the University of Chicago Press. Puccini has been less favourably treated: Ricordi publish full scores of all but his first two operas, but no critical edition has been announced. Catalogues ( selective list ) all published

Article

Richard Macnutt

full score of Bertoni’s Orfeo ( c 1776 ); it was only the second complete opera to be published in full score in Italy since 1658 . A reissue from the same plates, but without an imprint, was published for the opera’s revival at the Venice Carnival ( 1782–3 ). After about 1785 the firm gradually did less music engraving, but the premises on the Rialto were retained at least until late 1803 . Music of every type was sold there, including manuscript copies of numbers from the latest operas, dressed up within decoratively engraved paper wrappers. The majority of the

Article

Marie Cornaz

from 1745 to 1770 . As the official printer for the Théâtre de la Monnaie he printed librettos for opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d'ariettes performed there by composers such as Duni, Monsigny and Philidor, some with a musical supplement. His publications were covered at first by a privilege of impression and sale ( 1757–66 ) which applied only to works that had not yet been staged at Brussels, and then by another which allowed Boucherie to print and sell all theatre works. Under this later privilege, he forged Parisian editions (such as Toinon et Toinette

Article

Richard Macnutt

scores of operas by Clapisson and Narcisse Girard. In 1843 followed piano-vocal scores of Don Pasquale and Marie di Rohan and the full score of Thomas’ Mina ; and in 1844 the performing materials of Donizetti’s Dom Sébastien and Adam’s Cagliostro , Kastner’s Traite d’instrumentation , piano works by Alkan, Liszt and Franck, and the vocal score of I lombardi . It was the first Verdi opera published by Escudier, and from this moment both the influence and the activity of the firm greatly increased, predominantly in opera. In all, some 20 operas in full score

Article

Desmond Shawe-Taylor

the most assiduous and cosmopolitan opera-going. Not only do more and more of the voluminous works of Rossini, Donizetti and Verdi reach the catalogues, but also the operas of Franz Schreker, George Enescu, Albéric Magnard and many more. A cautious writer now hesitates to describe any opera as inaccessible on disc for fear of being proved wrong by the time his words are printed. As for the standard classics, it is scarcely possible to exaggerate the ‘mushrooming’, during the 1980s, of the record industry and its activities. All this, it may well be thought, is by and

Article

Stefano Ajani

1894 the firm also developed a lithographic department. Giudici & Strada is specially known for didactic works for the voice and for the piano (various works by Czerny and the Italian edition of Henri Herz’s 1000 esercizi applicati all’uso del dactylion ), transcriptions for the piano and various instrumental combinations, and operas by Cagnoni, Petrella and Flotow. It also published works by Usiglio and Lauro Rossi. In 1893 Arturo Demarchi merged his own firm with Giudici & Strada; in 1894 he became the sole proprietor and later moved the company to Milan.

Article

Richard Macnutt

methods were published. Other publications included 17 overtures and 36 duets for wind instruments, 30 concertos, 14 symphonies concertantes for various instrumental combinations and full scores of Cherubini’s Eliza and of six operas by Catel. After Ozi's death in 1813 production was almost entirely limited to reprinting earlier publications. All the publications of the firm were engraved. Bibliography DEMF HopkinsonD C. Pierre : Le Magasin de musique à l'usage des fêtes nationales et du Conservatoire (Paris, 1895/ R )

Article

Emil Katzbichler and Karl Robert Brachtel

cke berühmter Musiker-Handschriften , and Oskar von Riesemann’s Monographien zur russischen Musik . The main part of the firm’s output was devoted to music, often in connection with premières of contemporary opera in Munich and operetta in Berlin. The Berlin branch published mainly operas, operettas and ballets as well as dance, popular and film music. Opera and ballet composers published by the firm included Eugen d’Albert, Walter Courvoisier, Robert Heger, J.G. Mraczek, Friedrich Klose, Franz Schmidt, Bernhard Sekles and H.W. Waltershausen; light music was represented

Article

Ronald W. Rodman

broadcast to appeal to the mass viewing market. Eventually, the special broadcasts and commissions for new classical works died out as other TV genres such as dramas, situation comedies, sporting events, and news and current events programs gained popularity. Almost all classical music broadcast in both opera and the concert hall was taken over by such public television networks as PBS, which began in 1961 . The influence of Broadway on television was evident in the NBC broadcast of the Broadway musical Peter Pan starring Mary Martin in the title role. The musical

Article

Vigoni  

Mariangela Donà

Milanese writers and artists. His music publications include sacred vocal and instrumental chamber music by such composers as C.G. San Romano, M.S. Perucona, Giacinto Pestalozza, Tomaso Motta, Bartolomeo Trabattone, G.M. Angeleri and Gerolamo Zanetti. He also published many oratorio and opera librettos. Of Francesco’s five sons, Carlo Federico Vigoni ( 1658 – c 1693 ) shared the management of the firm with his father. He was a musician and the editor of Nuova Raccolta de Motetti Sacri a voce sola ( 1679 , 1681 ) and Sacre Armonie a voce sola de diversi celebri autori

Article

Gutheil  

Geoffrey Norris

Rachmaninoff’s graduation from the Moscow Conservatory in 1892 Gutheil bought his opera Aleko , two cello pieces and six songs, and in October the same year he bought the First Piano Concerto. He published the cello pieces as op.2, and later included some of the songs in op.4, but, possibly unwilling to risk financial loss on a relatively unknown composer, he only issued a vocal score of Aleko and a two-piano arrangement of the concerto. Nevertheless from then until 1914 nearly all Rachmaninoff’s major compositions appeared under the Gutheil imprint (a few were

Article

Richard Macnutt

little or none of the risk. It was to overcome these disadvantages that the six composers joined forces. Each contracted to furnish at least one opera or 50 pages of his music each year; each was entitled to the proceeds from the sale of his own works, less 5%, and to a share in the profits of the firm's publications of works by non-associated composers. Isouard was the only one of the six who regularly provided operas for publication; the firm printed nine of his in full score. Other full scores published included Cherubini's Anacréon , Méhul's Joseph and Boieldieu's

Article

Richard Evidon

death, and in 1984 (using the new digital technology), as well as several operas (notably the complete Ring , 1966–9 ). Karajan's status as the most prominent, and bestselling, of the label's artists continued until well after his death in 1989 . Two other conductors played a significant part in establishing Deutsche Grammophon's strong postwar position in the Classical and Romantic repertory. Beginning in 1953 , Karl Böhm recorded much of the standard Austro-German symphonic and opera repertory, notably the music of Mozart and the conductor's friend Richard Strauss;

Article

Rudolf Elvers

the second half of the 19th century it became the leading firm in northern Germany for opera publication (e.g. Gounod’s Faust , entitled Margarethe , Nicolai’s Die lustigen Weiber , Meyerbeer’s L’Africaine and operas by Flotow, Brüll, Mascagni, Kienzl and Smetana). It also acquired the rights to all Offenbach’s operettas and Johann Strauss’s Waldmeister . Through the purchase of Lauterbach & Kuhn much of Reger’s work became the property of Bote & Bock. Besides further operas (e.g. d’Albert’s Die toten Augen and Tiefland and Respighi’s La campana sommersa

Article

Rainer E. Lotz

such as Erich Kleiber and included recordings by dance bands, opera singers such as Joseph Schmidt and Michael Bohnen and instrumentalists such as Georg Kulenkampff. From 1933 Telefunken branched out into the production of gramophone records and subsidiaries were founded in Japan, the USA and Sweden. In 1937 , after Deutsche Grammophon AG was liquidated, Telefunken and the Deutsche Bank led a consortium which founded a new company, Telefunken-Platte GmbH und Grammophon GmbH; however, Telefunken sold all its shares in the company in 1941 . From 1935 to 1939 a cheap