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Article

Howard Mayer Brown

(1929)] E. Hertzmann : ‘Alfred Einstein and Curt Sachs’, MQ , 27 (1941), 263–79 [incl. selective list of writings] K. Hahn : ‘Verzeichnis der wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten von Curt Sachs’, AcM , 29 (1957), 94–106 E. Hertzmann : ‘Curt Sachs (1881–1959): a Memorial Address’, JAMS , 11 (1958), 1–5 G. Reese and R. Brandel , eds.: The Commonwealth of Music, in Honor of Curt Sachs (New York, 1965) [incl. L. Schrade: ‘Curt Sachs as Historian’, 1–9; H.H. Dräger: ‘Curt Sachs as an Ethnomusicologist’, 10–25] S. Youngerman : ‘Curt Sachs and his Heritage: a Critical Review of

Article

Klaus Wachsmann, Margaret J. Kartomi, Erich M. von Hornbostel, and Curt Sachs

Mahillon’s catalogue, which began to appear in 1880 , became the basis of several later systems, the most notable of which was that of E.M. von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs in their Systematik der Musikinstrumente: ein Versuch , published in 1914. This system eclipsed its predecessor and achieved a pre-eminence which it never lost, despite subsequent challenges, adaptations and developments. Hornbostel and Sachs were as concerned to establish an open-ended discussion (‘ein Versuch’) of the problems inherent in classifying musical instruments as they were to show how

Article

John Shepard

revised by Janet K. Page

s, both in the United States and abroad. The society holds annual meetings devoted to performances, panel discussions, the presentation of papers, and visits to collections. It awards subventions and annual prizes for research that furthers the society’s goals: these include the Curt Sachs Award (for lifetime achievement), the Frances Densmore Prize (for the most significant article in English), and the Nicholas Bessaraboff Prize (for the most distinguished book-length work in English). Its Journal (published annually since 1974 ) and Newsletter (three per year

Article

Sarah Adams Hoover

created a significant resource for exhibiting, studying, and conserving historical instruments. He taught music history at USD and established and oversaw the university’s masters program in the history of musical instruments. A recipient of the American Musical Instrument Society’s Curt Sachs Award for lifetime contributions to the field of organology, he served as its president from 1981–87 and editor of its newsletter from 1976–94. Writings “Early Italian Plucked String Instruments at the Shrine to Music Museum,” Lute Society of America

Article

Howard Schott

instrumentalists specializing in 13th- to 16th-century music. Van den Borren served as the group’s musical adviser. As its conductor Cape toured throughout Europe and North and South America, and made many recordings for such distinguished series as L’Anthologie Sonore, directed by Curt Sachs, and the History of European Music in Sound. After World War II he resumed conducting the Pro Musica Antiqua both on concert tours and in recordings, including several of documentary historical interest. With the aid of the Belgian Ministry of Education he established a European

Article

Strophenlied’, AMw , 11 (1954), 39–59 ‘Ästhetische Grundlagen’, Stilkriterien der neuen Musik (Berlin, 1961, 2/1965), 34–43 ‘Die Verbindlichkeit der mathematischen Intervall-Definition’, Musikalische Zeitfragen , 10 (1962), 27–44 ‘Curt Sachs as an Ethnomusicologist’, The Commonwealth of Music, in Honor of Curt Sachs , ed. G. Reese and R. Brandel (New York, 1965), 10–25 ‘The Order of the Arts in the Catholic Service’, Paul A. Pisk: Essays in his Honor , ed. J. Glowacki (Austin, 1966), 1–9 ‘A Quantitative Analysis of Music as Exemplified by Beethoven’s

Article

David Ledbetter

he returned to Berlin as a freelance accompanist, primarily of singers. His involvement with early music began at this time with his interest in the collection at the Musikinstrumentenmuseum des Staatlichen Instituts für Musikforschung in Berlin and his meeting with its director, Curt Sachs, who encouraged him in playing historical keyboard instruments and in the study of performance practice. In these Neumeyer became a central figure, believing that each repertory, from Sweelinck and Frescobaldi to Schumann and Brahms, is best served by instruments of its own time

Article

Allison A. Alcorn

Hall since 1990. A leading organ scholar, she has won numerous awards including an NEH Fellowship ( 1974–5 ); the Westminster Choir College Alumni Citation of Merit ( 1988 ); the Organ Historical Society Distinguished Service Award ( 1988 ); the American Musical Instrument Society Curt Sachs Award ( 1994 ), and the AGO Organ Library Max Miller Book Award ( 2009 ). In 2005 Owen was honored by the Organ Historical Society with a festschrift, Litterae Organi: Essays in Honor of Barbara Owen (Richmond, VA). Selected writings Owen, Barbara The

Article

Jerome Rosen

Turetzky, Bertram ( b Norwich, CT , Feb 14, 1933 ). American double bass player and composer. He studied with Joseph Iadone and Josef Marx at the Hartt School of Music, graduating in 1955 , and later with Curt Sachs (musicology) at New York University. He received the MM in music history from the University of Hartford in 1965. Turetzky is a leading exponent of the double bass as a solo instrument and has extended an already noteworthy classical technique to include a large repertory of new bowings, harmonics, pizzicatos, glissandos and, especially, percussive

Article

Friedrich von Huene

Steinkopf, Otto ( b Stolberg , June 28, 1904; d Celle , Feb 17, 1980 ). German woodwind instrument maker. As a boy he learnt to play many wind instruments, and after graduating from high school in Magdeburg he studied music in Berlin, and later musicology with Curt Sachs. He attended the Stern Conservatory, and thereafter was employed by the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, the Berlin PO and the Berlin RSO. From 1950 to 1953 , he worked at the Berlin Instrument Collection of the Institut für Musikforschung as a restorer of woodwind instruments, and began

Article

Gerard Béhague

Lange, Francisco [ Franz ] Curt [ Kurt ] ( b Eilenburg , Dec 12, 1903; d Montevideo , May 3, 1997 ). Uruguayan musicologist of German origin. He studied at Leipzig, Berlin, Munich and Bonn universities, taking an architect’s diploma at Munich ( 1927 ) and the doctorate at Bonn ( 1929 ) with a dissertation on the polyphony of the Netherlands; his teachers included Nikisch, Sandberger, Bücken, van den Borren, Oeser, Hornbostel and Sachs. In 1930 the Uruguayan government invited him to help organize the country’s musical life and he settled in Montevideo

Article

Timothy Rice

scale and melody (Hornbostel, 1913 ); create a classification system for musical instruments (Hornbostel and Sachs ( 1914 ); and transcribe and analyze the musical structures of many individual musical styles (e.g. Hornbostel, 1923 ). Hornbostel produced only two doctoral students in comparative musicology, Mieczyslaw Kolinski and Fritz Bose, but other influential scholars who worked with them included Otto Abraham, Robert Lachmann, Marius Schneider, Curt Sachs and George Herzog, some of whom brought their ideas to North America in the 1930s and 40s. In addition to

Article

Su Zheng

he went to Germany in 1920 as a journalist to seek new knowledge of social reform. However, he soon became attracted to music, and by 1923 he was writing on the subject. In 1927 he entered Berlin University, studying with Ludwig Schiedermair, Erich Hornbostel, I. Schmitt and Curt Sachs. In 1934 he received his PhD in musicology from the Frederick William University, Bonn. In his numerous writings in the 1920s and 30s for both Chinese and Western readers he was the first scholar systematically to introduce European music to China and Chinese music to Europe. His

Article

Sarah Adams Hoover

retirement in 1996 he worked as a technical writer for several computer firms, including New England Digital Corporation, makers of the Synclavier. He served as treasurer and board member of the American Musical Instrument Society ( 1978–2002 ) and is the recipient of the society’s Curt Sachs Award for lifetime contributions to the field of organology. Writings Brass Instrument Key and Valve Mechanisms Made in America before 1875 with Special Reference to the D.S. Pillsbury Collection in Greenfield Village, Dearborn, Michigan (diss., U. of

Article

Etienne Darbellay

revised by Dorothea Baumann

géographie , 44/1 (1948), 1–54 ‘La polyphonie chez les esquimaux’, Journal de la Société des américanistes , new ser., 37 (1948), 259–68 ‘Teoria dwutonowych melodii’ [Theory of bitonal melodies], KM , no.6 (1948), 208–33 ‘Ein Versuch der Musikarchäologie: zu einem Buche von Curt Sachs’, SMz , 88 (1948), 348–52 ‘Les fonds de musique ancienne de la Bibliothèque de la ville de Neuchâtel’, Bibliothèques et musées de la ville de Neuchâtel (1949–50), 15–19 Die Musik der Eskimos: eine vergleichende Studie (Fribourg, 1951) ‘Chants et rythmes de la danse d’hommes

Article

William Waterhouse

the Faculty of Music as a teaching assembly of historic instruments accessible to students. In 1946 he became founder-chairman and, from 1977 until his death, president of the Galpin Society. He was elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1979. In 1988 he won the Curt Sachs Award of the American Musical Instrument Society. His main work was a valuable series of monographs on a wide range of wind instruments, together with entries for this dictionary. These have made him an acknowledged authority in the field. Writings The Oboe:

Article

Walter ( b Karlsbad [now Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic] , April 1, 1907; d Bloomington, IN , Sept 9, 1984 ). American ethnomusicologist , conductor and composer of Austro-Hungarian origin. He studied at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik with Franz Schreker and Curt Sachs and at Prague University with Gustav Becking and Paul Nettl. He conducted opera in Karlovy Vary and Eger, Bohemia, 1927–8. His appointments included those of music director for All-India Radio ( 1935–46 ), head of the piano department at the Conservatory of Halifax, Nova Scotia

Article

Lewis Lockwood

Hälfte des 16. Jahrhunderts’, ZMw , 12 (1929–30), 138–47 Adrian Willaert in der weltlichen Vokalmusik seiner Zeit (diss., U. of Berlin, 1931; Leipzig, 1931/ R ) ‘Trends in the Development of the Chanson in the Early Sixteenth Century’, PAMS 1940 , 5–10 ‘Alfred Einstein and Curt Sachs’, MQ , 27 (1941), 263–79 ‘The Newly Discovered Autograph of Beethoven’s Rondo à Capriccio , Op.129’, MQ , 32 (1946), 171–95 ‘Beethoven in historischer und künstlerischer Sicht’, SMz , 94 (1954), 319–22 ‘Mozart’s Creative Process’, MQ , 43 (1957), 187–200 ‘Mozart and

Article

Laurence Libin

and the USA. Once these repositories were established, organologists, who were often also museum curators, confronted the challenges of comprehensive classification and description. Curt Sachs's Real-Lexikon der Musikinstrumente ( 1913 ), a pioneering effort to systematize knowledge of instruments on a worldwide basis, and the widely-adopted classificatory scheme devised jointly by Sachs and Erich von Hornbostel were based on Victor-Charles Mahillon's research on instruments collected at the Brussels Conservatory beginning in the 1870s. Nicholas Bessaraboff, who in

Article

Paula Morgan and Israel J. Katz

‘Libraries of Music’, Thompson9 ‘Table Blessings Set to Music’, The Commonwealth of Music, in Honor of Curt Sachs , ed. G. Reese and R. Brandel (New York, 1965), 236–82 ‘Broadsides and their Music in Colonial America’, Music in Colonial Massachusetts, 1630–1820 , i: Music in Public Places , ed. B. Lambert (Boston, 1980), 157–367 ‘Aristocratic Patronage and the Spanish Guitar in the Seventeenth Century’, Guitar Review , 49 (1981), 2–3; l (1982), 6–10 ‘Curt Sachs and the Library Museum of the Performing Arts’, Musica judaica , 4 (1981–2), 9–19 ‘A Tune for Benjamin