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Article

Rodolfo Celletti

revised by Valeria Pregliasco Gualerzi

Krusceniski [ Riccioni, née Kruszelnicka ], Salomea [ Krushel′nytska, Solomiya ] ( b Bilyavyntsi, Halychyna [now Tarnopol′] province , 11 / Sept 23, 1872; d L′viv , Nov 16, 1952 ). Ukrainian soprano , later naturalized Italian , active also in Spain and Argentina. She studied with Valery Wysocki in Lemberg (now L′viv) and made her début there in 1893 , then appeared at Kraków. In 1895 she continued her studies at Milan with Fausta Crespi and during the 1895–6 season at Cremona she appeared in Puccini's Manon Lescaut and in Les Huguenots. Until

Article

Eliot B. Levin

but also occasionally in Paris; the standard of orchestral accompaniment is generally noticeably better than that on other labels. Artists who recorded mainly or exclusively for the firm include Giuseppe Anselmi, Alessandro Bonci, Victor Capoul, Adamo Didur, Léon Escalaïs, Salomea Krusceniski, Victor Maurel, Mario Sammarco, Rosina Storchio, Riccardo Stracciari, Francesco Vignas and Giovanni Zenatello. Many recordings have been re-released on CD. Jean de Reszke and the Romanian soprano Hariclea Darclée may also have been recorded in Paris but no copies are known.

Article

Rodolfo Celletti

revised by Valeria Pregliasco Gualerzi

delivery and the dignity and refinement of her vocal line; she was considered one of the finest interpreters of Aida, Amelia, and Leonora in both Il trovatore and La forza del destino. In an era of dynamic and passionate singing actresses (Bellincioni, Burzio, Carelli, Destinn, Krusceniski), her primitive acting and unfamiliarity with the verismo repertory, except for Cavalleria rusticana and Tosca , prejudiced her career. However, she scored a great success on gramophone records, being one of the first dramatic sopranos whose voice recorded well. Bibliography

Article

Rodolfo Celletti

was not large, but flexible, pure and sweet; at the height of the popularity for verismo opera she personified the lyrical, refined, gentle school of singing. Her plaintive and fragile Cio-Cio-San was typical of this approach, in contrast to the more lively and dramatic style of Krusceniski and Destinn. But in other roles, such as Violetta or Manon, her acute sensitivity led her to depict the characters with passionate and touching impulsiveness. After her retirement in 1922 she taught singing and devoted herself to charitable works. Rosina Storchio

Article

Gloria  

Julian Budden

arrives she gladly consents to their wedding. During the nuptial ceremony in the Bardi chapel Folco stabs the bridegroom under cover of a fraternal embrace. Gloria stabs herself with Lionetto’s dagger and expires on his dead body. The première was conducted by Toscanini with Salomea Krusceniski (Gloria), Giovanni Zenatello (Lionetto), Pasquale Amato (Folco) and Nazzareno De Angelis (Aquilante). In 1932 Cilea revised and shortened the opera with the librettist Ettore Moschini, changing Folco’s name to Bardo and removing a confrontation between him and Lionetto in Act 2

Article

Thomas Kaufman

Caruso, who sang in five operas. Bracale was again impresario in Cairo, but at the much more important Khedivial theatre from 1908 to 1912; here he continued his practice of hiring outstanding young singers (Amelita Galli-Curci, Hipolito Lazaro) before they became famous. Salomea Krusceniski, Eugenia Burzio, Carmen Melis, Antonio Magini-Coletti and Eugenio Giraldoni also sang for him during these years. In 1912 he put on Aida at the Pyramids. Bracale’s Latin-American activities began in 1915 with a tour of South America, including Buenos Aires (the Teatro Coliseo)

Article

Odessa  

Virko Baley

and Y. Znatokov ( b 1926 ). The core of Odessa's musical life, and one of the most important musical centres of the tsarist empire, was opera: such composer-conductors as Tchaikovsky, Rubinstein, Rimsky-Korsakov, Nápravník, Arensky and Glazunov, and singers such as Chaliapin, Krusceniski, Sobinov, Caruso, Battistini, Anselmi and Titta Ruffo graced the stage there. The Odessa Russian Opera was founded in 1809. In its early years the theatre featured drama and opera productions, ballets and vaudevilles, in which Russian, Italian and French companies appeared. In

Article

Susana Salgado

and Edoardo Garbin ( 1902 ) came the golden age of the Solís: in 1903 Toscanini brought a 285-person company from La Scala headed by Enrico Caruso in the tenor's first visit to Montevideo; in 1904 he came with Rosina Storchio in Madama Butterfly , and in 1906 with Salomea Krusceniski singing Wagner. A stream of internationally renowned singers followed. Richard Strauss conducted his Elektra. José Oxilia, Victor Damiani and José Soler were among the best Uruguayan singers who performed at the Solís. Other theatres of the period – the Cibils ( 1871 ), S Felipe

Article

L′viv  

Jolanta Guzy-Pasiakowa and Virko Baley

the successive direction of Jarecki ( 1874–1900 ), Tadeusz Pawlikowski ( 1900–06 ) and Ludwik Heller ( 1906–18 ) the Polish theatre in L′viv became, after Warsaw, the most important Polish opera house. Internationally famous singers who started their careers there included Salomea Krusceniski, Adam Didur and Aleksander Myszuga. Having achieved success at La Scala, Didur returned to the city in 1932 and became director of the Opera and professor of singing at the conservatory. In 1900 a new building was opened, the Teatr Wielki (Grand Theatre), which during the interwar

Article

Julian Budden

several details involving Butterfly’s relations in Act 1, divided the long second act into two parts separated by an interval and added the arietta ‘Addio, fiorito asil’ for Pinkerton. The second performance took place on 28 May that same year at the Teatro Grande, Brescia, Salomea Krusceniski replacing Rosina Storchio among the original cast. This time the opera enjoyed a triumph. Nonetheless further modifications were to follow, mainly affecting Act 1. These ended with the Paris première, which was given by the Opéra-Comique on 28 December 1906 , and formed the basis