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Sarah Caissie Provost

(b Port of Spain, Trinidad, June 11, 1920; d New York, NY, Oct 2, 1981). American Jazz pianist, vocalist, actress, saxophonist. She was the daughter of Alma Young Scott, a classically trained pianist. She migrated with her mother to Harlem, New York, in 1924. At age 8 she attended the Juilliard School of Music. In the 1930s she played saxophone in Lil Hardin’s orchestra, in addition to a demanding performance schedule as a pianist.

An African American activist, she was well known for her support of civil rights. She refused to play for segregated audiences and included such a clause in every contract. She had a short career as a Hollywood actress that ended after she staged a three-day strike on set, protesting the portrayal of black women in the movie The Heat’s On. Scott hosted a short-lived television program, The Hazel Scott Show, in 1950. With this show she became the first black woman to host her own television program. Shortly after the program premiered, she appeared voluntarily before the House Committee for Un-American Activities in ...

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Sarah Caissie Provost

A collection of noisy instruments usually assembled for a celebration. These are usually re-purposed items such as cowbells, tin cooking pans and utensils, copper wash boilers, saws, and small unloaded firearms, including shotguns and occasionally small cannons. Tin horns have often been used as well. These bands, popular in the 19th century, usually followed parades on such celebratory occasions as July 4th and New Year’s Eve. As their homemade instruments indicate, callithumpian bands were not organized musical ensembles but rather rowdy mobs intent upon creating discord.

The origins of the term “callithumpian” are unknown, but are thought to be related to the mythological Greek muse Calliope, who was also the namesake of the musical steam engine, the calliope, which originated around the same time. “Callithumpian” may have been produced by combining the sweet-voiced muse’s name with the more lowly verb “to thump.” Although “callithumpian” is the most reproduced form of the word, it also appears in forms such as “callathumpian,” and all variants are often combined with “band” or “party.” Because of the unfamiliar beginning of the word “callithumpian,” it is also sometimes seen as “cowthumpin,” which indicates its rural popularity. In the East, particularly in Philadelphia, callithumpian bands appeared costumed, usually as women or African Americans, and mocked military music groups such as the fife and drum corps. A callithumpian band would sometimes accompany “fantasticals,” or men who mocked the militia. In the Northeast, callithumpian bands were sometimes called “serenades.” A related ensemble is the ...

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David Johnson

1740 his work changed direction: he was drawn into an Edinburgh fashion for arranging Scots tunes. His settings, however, outdo rival ones in their subtle blend of Scottish and Italian musical styles. McGibbon left his estate to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary (whose director, Lord Provost George Drummond, had subscribed for his 1740 sonatas and was the chief mourner at his funeral). However, the infirmary sold the plates of his Scots-tune collections to the publisher Robert Bremner. The ensuing reprints secured McGibbon's fame until well into the 19th century, when

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Peter Holman, Gerald Gifford and Richard Platt

The Autobiography and Correspondence of Mary Granville, Mrs Delaney , ed. Lady Llanover (London, 1861–2) C. Lambert : ‘Thomas Roseingrave’, PMA , 58 (1931–2), 67–83 G.D. Burtchaell and T.U. Sadleir : Alumni dublinensis: a Register of the Students, Graduates, Professors and Provosts of Trinity College in the University of Dublin (1593–1860) (Dublin, 1935), 716 V. Butcher : ‘Thomas Roseingrave’, ML , 19 (1938), 280–94 R. Newton : ‘The English Cult of Domenico Scarlatti’, ML , 20 (1939), 138–56 F.C.J. Swanton : ‘The Training of the Organist and Choirmaster’

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Paris  

Elizabeth Cook, Gordon A. Anderson, Thomas B. Payne, Daniel Heartz, Richard Freedman, James R. Anthony, John Eby, Elisabeth Cook, Beverly Wilcox, Paul F. Rice, David Charlton, John Trevitt, Guy Gosselin and Jann Pasler

as ductiae and estampies formed the musical framework for public dancing in the open air. Paris was also a focal point for professional singers and players of secular music. In September 1321 a group of 37 ‘menestreus et menestrelles, jongleurs et jongleresses’ petitioned the provost of Paris to enact a set of legal statutes that would regulate the behaviour of their members and set rules for those who sought to join their enterprise. The successive names given to a certain street in Paris demonstrate that an association of minstrels had formed part of the city’s