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Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

Northumbrian Bagpipes: their Development and Makers (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1933 ) W.A. Cocks and F. Bryan: The Northumbrian Bagpipes ( 1967 ) Newcastle upon Tyne Hancock Museum, University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne: c 85 ethnological incl. W.A. Cocks collection. Northleach Keith Harding’s World of Mechanical Music Oxford Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford: European art string and keyboard, 17th-century non-European, and some archaeological, incl. W.E. Hill & Son and J. Francis Mallet collections. T. Dart: ‘The Instruments in the Ashmolean Museum’, GSJ , vii

Article

Raoul F. Camus

Interlochen, Michigan, the most famous of the many summer music schools. As early as 1919 Harding had invited school band directors to observe his rehearsals at the University of Illinois and to discuss specific problems and repertoire. In 1930 he began a series of band clinics that became so successful and influential that Harding may rightfully be called the “Dean of University Band Directors.” When the American Bandmasters Association was organized in 1929 , Harding was the only educator included among the service and professional band directors. By 1941

Article

Katherine K. Preston and Michael Mauskapf

their own careers with the assistance of the Internet or hiring smaller scale, independent managers. Bibliography A.L. Bernheim et al.: The Business of the Theatre; Prepared on Behalf of the Actors’ Equity Association by Alfred L. Bernheim, Assisted by Sara Harding and the Staff of the Labor Bureau, Inc. (New York, 1932) C. Bode : The American Lyceum, Town Meeting of the Mind (New York, 1956) P. Hart : Orpheus in the New World: The Symphony Orchestra as an American Cultural Institution—its Past, Present, and Future (New York, 1973),

Article

Rolfe  

Margaret Cranmer

the Consolidated Rates for the parish of All Hallows, Honey Lane. James Longman Rolfe (relationship not certain) joined the firm in 1836 . The firm ceased production in 1888 . In 1797 , with Samuel Davis, Rolfe patented (no.2160) the earliest specification for ‘Turkish music’ in pianos, where a hammer strikes the soundboard to produce the sound of a drum. The hammer action, based on the English single action ( see Pianoforte §I 4. and fig. ) and operated by a pedal, is illustrated in Harding (p.135). The patent also specifies that instead of using the soundboard

Article

Stodart  

Margaret Cranmer

had an older brother, William ( b London, 6 July 1792 ), but the extent of his involvement in the business is not known. Manufacture ceased in 1861 . Bibliography BoalchM ClinkscaleMP W. Pole : Musical Instruments in the Great Industrial Exhibition of 1851 (London, 1851) R.E.M. Harding : The Piano-Forte: its History Traced to the Great Exhibition of 1851 (Cambridge, 1933/ R , 2/1978/ R ) M. Cole : The Pianoforte in the Classical Era (Oxford, 1998)

Article

Ray Pratt

including President Ronald Reagan, as a patriotic anthem, and by others, including Springsteen, as a statement about the mistreatment of Vietnam veterans. Among the most striking songs of the entire period was Bob Dylan’s “All along the Watchtower,” from the 1968 album John Wesley Harding . The song gained momentum with Jimi Hendrix’s cover on Electric Ladyland ( 1968 ), and Dylan performed the song for decades much as Hendrix had. On first hearing, the lyrics are seemingly not directly about the war; its lyrical images instead convey tortured confusion. Suggesting