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Article

Simon Emmerson and Denis Smalley

Luigi, §2: Compositional theory and practice Notation, §III, 6(i): 20th-century non-mensural notation Piñera, Juan Roedelius, Hans-Joachim Rosenboom, David Score, §3(vi): History: 20th century Sikora, Elżbieta Spoerri, Bruno Stockhausen, Karlheinz, §2: Works Tal, Josef Tcherepnin: (4) Ivan Tcherepnin Teitelbaum, Richard Tomita, Isao Truax, Barry Tyranny, ‘Blue’ Gene Varèse, Edgard Watts, John (ii) Weidenaar, Reynold Xenakis, Iannis, §13: Electro-acoustic works midi

Article

Richard Taruskin

little in the exuberantly decorative score that cannot be associated with the idiom of such older Rimsky-Korsakov pupils as Anatoly Lyadov and especially Nikolay Tcherepnin. Stravinsky dedicated the work to its librettist, Mitusov. When in 1909 Stravinsky began receiving commissions from Sergey Dyagilev, first for some Chopin orchestrations for the ballet Les sylphides and then (following Lyadov’s and Tcherepnin’s refusal) for The Firebird , he found himself sidetracked from his operatic project, and eventually turned cold not only to it but (under the influence

Article

Richard Taruskin

Later, Sakhnovsky completed the work in continuous music, in which form it was given at the Bol’shoy Theatre, Moscow, under Nikolay Golovanov on 10 January 1925 . (2): completed and orchestrated by César Cui, 1915–16 , using Golenishchev-Kutuzov’s supplementary text; it was published in 1916 and given under Grzegorz Fitelberg at the Theatre of Musical Drama, St Petersburg, on 13/ 26 October 1917 . (3): as a pastiche, by Nikolay Tcherepnin, incorporating items from (1) and (2) with other music by Musorgsky; it was given at the Monte Carlo Opera House on 27 March

Article

Richard Taruskin

Theatre, Moscow, in 1901 under Ippolit Al’tani, with Shalyapin (for whom Rimsky had composed an extra aria, to begin Act 3, in 1898 ). The opera was given as Ivan le Terrible at the Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris, during the first Dyagilev season, on 20 May 1909 , conducted by Nikolay Tcherepnin, with Shalyapin and Yelizaveta Petrenko. Written during the heyday of historical drama in Russia, The Maid of Pskov is based on a play that attempted not only to portray historical events but to explain them according to enlightened historiographical notions. Mey’s Pskovityanka

Article

Ballet  

Rebecca Harris-Warrick, Noël Goodwin and John Percival

which was followed by similar Schumann anthologies for Le carnaval ( 1910 ) and Papillons ( 1914 ); a miscellany of works by different composers for the same ballet, as in Cleopatra ( 1909 ), which used music by Arensky, Glazunov, Glinka, Musorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Taneyev and Tcherepnin; or the association of a new balletic narrative or theme with a single work, as in Sheherazade ( 1910 ), where Rimsky-Korsakov’s music was matched to a story different from that which prompted his composition. Diaghilev soon realized that musical integrity was no less important

Article

Dranishnikov, Vladimir Alexandrovich ( b St Petersburg , 29 May / June 10, 1893 ; d Kiev , Feb 6, 1939 ). Russian conductor and composer . He studied at the St Petersburg Conservatory with Lyadov and Shteynberg (composition) and Nikolay Tcherepnin (conducting). Having led the orchestra at the Mariinsky Theatre he was conductor from 1918 , and music director from 1925 to 1936 . A talented opera conductor, he achieved a sensitive integration of voices and orchestra to dramatic as well as musical purpose. Under his direction the theatre

Article

Arthur Jacobs

, March 14, 1887 ; d Killin, Perthshire , Dec 19, 1982 ). English conductor and composer . He was a choirboy at Westminster Abbey, organ scholar at Exeter College, Oxford ( 1908–12 ), and then a student at the St Petersburg Conservatory, where his teachers included Nikolay Tcherepnin and Maximilian Steinberg. He graduated in 1917 and after military service in Britain returned to Petrograd as an assistant to Albert Coates, at that time a conductor at the Mariinsky Theatre. In 1920 , back in London, he joined the music staff at the Old Vic, which at that

Article

Stephen Walsh

typically, exotically Russian fairy tale he or his collaborators could think of, Zhar′-ptitsa (‘The Firebird’). The process by which this commission eventually reached the largely untried Stravinsky is still obscure (it certainly came by way of Diaghilev's resident composer, Nikolay Tcherepnin, and Lyadov, and possibly also Stravinsky's old counterpoint teacher Akimenko). Diaghilev's telegram, indeed, was no more than a sounding-out, and the commission was probably only confirmed in early December. By that time Stravinsky had already sketched some music, and may even