1-4 of 4 items

  • Abbreviation: "A-Ed" x
Clear all

Article

Peter Branscombe

revised by David J. Buch

(Emanuel)

(b Mirotice, Feb 7, 1758; d Munich, Dec 10, 1826). Austrian tenor, composer, and flautist of Bohemian origin. He acquired a basic musical and general education from his father, a school teacher, and later studied at Staré Sedlo, Svatá Hora and (from 1773) Prague, where he was a chorister at the cathedral. From 1775 he studied medicine, philosophy, and singing (with Karl Frieberth) in Vienna; while a student he wrote some Singspiele and oratorios. In 1780 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Heinrich von Schönaich-Carolath in Silesia. After two years of irregular employment, mostly in Bohemia, he joined Schikaneder’s travelling theatre company in 1786. The company toured extensively in southern Germany and Austria before settling in Vienna in 1789, where Schack became the principal tenor at the Theater auf der Wieden (1789). His fame as a composer was based on his (and others’) contributions to the series of Schikaneder’s seven ‘Anton’ Singspiele, mostly written in collaboration with F.X. Gerl and J.B. Henneberg He was a close friend of Mozart, who composed (or assisted with) certain numbers for Schack, Henneberg and F.X. Gerl’s theatrical scores (notably the duet ‘Nun liebes Weibchen’ ...

Article

Peter Branscombe

revised by David J. Buch

(b Vienna, Dec 5, 1768; d Vienna, Nov 26, 1822). Austrian composer, Kapellmeister and organist. He succeeded his father as organist at the Schottenstift in Vienna, and by late 1789 had joined Schikaneder’s company at the Theater auf der Wieden (later the Theater an der Wien) as Kapellmeister and composer. He probably coordinated and certainly contributed to a number of successful collaborative operas at that theatre, particularly the series Der dumme Gärtner aus dem Gebirge, and numerous fairy-tale singspiels such as Der Stein der Weisen (1790) and Der wohltätige Derwisch (1791). He also arranged a number of foreign-language operas in German translation for the theatre. He supervised rehearsals of Die Zauberflöte during Mozart’s absence in Prague and conducted the opera from the third performance. From 1797 he had an able co-director in Seyfried. Apart from his own works, he arranged the piano scores of the Süssmayr-Schikaneder ...

Article

Margaret Grave and Jay Lane

[Ditters, Carl]

(b Vienna, Nov 2, 1739; d Neuhof [now Nový Dvůr], nr Sobĕslav, Bohemia, Oct 24, 1799). Austrian composer and violinist. After promising early success in Vienna, he settled for a modest career as a provincial Kapellmeister and administrator. He composed voluminously despite the official responsibilities that occupied him for much of his life, and his generally high standard of craftsmanship earned him recognition as a leading figure of the Viennese Classical school.

Born to Paul Ditters, costumier at the imperial court and theatre in Vienna, and his wife Anna (née Vandelin), Ditters enjoyed the benefits of a Jesuit school education, private tutoring and, from the age of seven, violin lessons. About 1750 he began studies with the violinist J.P. Ziegler, and before long he was accepted into the orchestra of the Schottenkirche. Soon afterwards he was recruited as a Kammerknabe by Prince Joseph Friedrich von Sachsen-Hildburghausen, whose Kapelle was one of the best in Vienna; from ...

Article

Mauricio Dottori and Paul J. Jackson

[Davide]

(b Naples, 1711; d Lisbon, Oct 30, 1778). Italian composer. He was the son of Giovanni Perez and Rosalina Serrari, both Neapolitans (the surname Perez, of Spanish origin, was fairly common in the former Kingdom of the Two Sicilies). At the age of 11 he became a student at the Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto in Naples, where he remained until 1733, studying counterpoint with Francesco Mancini, singing and keyboard playing with Giovanni Veneziano, and the violin with Francesco Barbella. On completion of his studies, Perez immediately entered the service of the Sicilian Prince of Aragona, Diego Naselli. His first known pieces, the Latin cantatas Ilium palladio astu subducto expugnatum and Palladium, performed in Palermo's Collegio della Società di Gesù for the laurelling festivities, date from 1734. For the next few years he was active in Palermo and Naples, his patron having become chamberlain to King Carlo I. His first opera, ...