1-12 of 12 Results  for:

  • All: Vicente Lusitano x
Clear all

Article

Lusitano, Vicente  

Bonnie J. Blackburn

revised by Garrett Schumann and Joseph McHardy

Lusitano, Vicente [ Lusitanus, Vincentius ] ( b ? Olivença [now Olivenza, Spain]; d after 1561 ). Portuguese composer and theorist of African descent. While some sources refer to him as ‘Vicente de Olivença’, his family name is unknown: the surname ‘Lusitano’ simply means ‘Portuguese’. Evidence of Lusitano’s racialized identity appears in a 17th-century manuscript by the Portuguese scholar João Franco Barreto (1600– c 1674), in which Lusitano is referred to as ‘homem pardo’. Used in Portugal to describe people with dark skin as early as the 14th century

Article

Escobedo, Bartolomé de  

Robert Stevenson

Casimiri : ‘I diarii sistini’, NA , 1 (1924), 267–74, esp. 268; xi (1934), 76–92, esp. 84; xiii (1936), 201–14, esp. 202 J. M. Llorens Cisteró : ‘Cinco cantores españoles en la capilla pontificia’, AnM , 36 (1982), 69–90 R. Stevenson : ‘The First Black Published Composer [Vicente Lusitano]’, Inter-American Music Review , 5/1 (1982–3), 79–103, esp. 92 R. Stevenson : ‘Spanish Polyphonists in the Age of the Armada’, Inter-American Music Review , 12/2 (1991–2), 17–114, esp. 32 F. Reynaud : La polyphonie tolédane et son milieu des premiers témoignages aux environs

Article

Danckerts, Ghiselin  

Lewis Lockwood

composer he was evidently little known and sparsely published; no single collection of his works remains. In 1551 Danckerts was chosen along with Bartolomé de Escobedo to judge the debate between Don Nicola Vicentino and Vicente Lusitano on the role of the chromatic and enharmonic genera in contemporary musical practice. The debate was won by Lusitano but its most lasting consequences were the writing of Vicentino’s well-known treatise, L’antica musica ridotta alla moderna prattica (Rome, 1555 ) and Danckerts’s own unpublished treatise, written in the wake of the

Article

Doizi de Velasco, Nicolás  

Robert Stevenson

revised by Monica Hall

variedad, y perfeccion, y se muestra ser instrumento perfecto, y abuntantissimo (a handwritten note in the only surviving copy, in E-Mn , states that it was printed in Naples in 1640 ). The authors of the preliminary décima and madrigal refer to him as ‘Apolo portugues’ and ‘Amphion lusitano’. The treatise shows that the five-course guitar can play music in three, four and five parts and realize a bass line fully in accordance with the rules of harmony in the same way as the theorbo, harpsichord and organ. To this end Doizi de Velasco devised a new tablature system. The

Article

Pinheiro, António  

Michael Ryan

sé de Évora (Lisbon, 1973) R. Stevenson and others, eds.: Antologia de polifónia portuguesa, 1419–1680 , PM, ser.A, 37 (Lisbon, 1982) J.A. Alegria : História da capela e colégio dos Santos Reis de Vila Viçosa (Lisbon, 1983) R.V. Nery : A música no ciclo da ‘Biblioteca lusitano’ (Lisbon, 1984) J.A. Alegria : Biblioteca do Palácio real de Vila Viçosa: catálogo dos fundos musicais (Lisbon, 1989) J.A. Alegria : O Colégio dos moços do coro da sé de Évora (Lisbon, 1997)

Article

Blado, Antonio  

Thomas W. Bridges

Psalmorum quatuor vocum liber primus ( 1559 ), Zoilo's Libro secondo de madrigali ( 1563 ) and Martelli's La nuova, et armonica compositione ( 1564 ). For, or with, Antonio Barrè he printed madrigal books by Francesco Menta ( 1560 ) and Lasso ( 1563 ). He also published Vicente Lusitano's Introdutione facilissima ( 1553 ), and his type was used in Barrè's 1555 edition of Vicentino's L'antica musica ridotta alla moderna prattica. Several of his liturgical books, beginning with Officium gloriosissimi nominis Jesu ( 1539 ), include plainchant. Blado's

Article

Ortiz, Diego  

Robert Stevenson

show the distinctive influence of Morales. A five-part funeral motet, Pereat dies (ed. H. Eslava in Lira sacro-hispana , Madrid, 1869 ), is not in the book of 1565 and may be by another Ortiz, like the three long six-part motets of I-Rvat C.S.24, copied in 1545. Vicente Lusitano, the probable author of an anonymous treatise (ed. in Collet), mentioned a Missa ‘L'homme armé’ by ‘Ortiz’. Two intabulations in Valderrábano's Silva de sirenas ( 1547 ) are ascribed in that collection not to Diego but to Miguel Ortiz. Works Trattado de glosas

Article

Vicentino, Nicola  

Henry W. Kaufmann

revised by Robert L. Kendrick

participated in the singing and playing of Vicentino’s music. The succeeding years saw the growing recognition of Vicentino’s work. In 1546 his first book of five-voice madrigals appeared at Venice. The central event in his life was the famous debate with the Portuguese musician Vicente Lusitano which took place in 1551 at Rome where Vicentino had moved with his patron. Vicentino’s argument was based on a particular interpretation of the genera which he later amplified in his treatise. Instead of considering the diatonic, chromatic or enharmonic tetrachord as a unit

Article

Carreira family  

Owen Rees

Viterbo : ‘Os mestres da capela real nos reinados de D. João III e D. Sebastião’, Arquivo histórico português , 5 (Lisbon, 1907), 43–59 J. López-Calo : Catálogo musical del archivo de la Santa Iglesia Catedral de Santiago (Cuenca, 1972), 43–4 M.S. Kastner : Três compositores lusitanos para instrumentos de tecla: António Carreira, Manuel Rodrigues Coelho, Pedro de Araújo (Lisbon, 1979), 11–26 R.V. Nery : ‘António Carreira, o velho, Fr. António Carreira e António Carreira, o moço: balanço de um enigma por resolver’, Livro de homenagem a Macario Santiago Kastner

Article

Animuccia, Giovanni  

Lewis Lockwood

revised by Noel O’Regan

in the service of Cardinal Guido Ascanio Sforza ( 1518–64 ). He was also associated with the exiled Florentine Altoviti family (his first book of motets was dedicated to Archbishop Antonio Altoviti and the dedication refers to the debate of 1551 between Nicola Vicentino and Vicente Lusitano on the nature of the genera, which both Animuccia and the archbishop clearly attended). Other members of the Altoviti circle at this time included Orlande de Lassus and Filippo Neri. In January 1555 Animuccia succeeded Palestrina as magister cantorum at the Cappella Giulia

Article

Improvisation  

Bruno Nettl, Rob C. Wegman, Imogene Horsley, Michael Collins, Stewart A. Carter, Greer Garden, Robert E. Seletsky, Robert D. Levin, Will Crutchfield, John Rink, Paul Griffiths, and Barry Kernfeld

the chants of the introits in the Proper of the Mass, as well as over the hymns, antiphons and graduals. Since motets and the Ordinary of the Mass were set as artfully worked-out compositions, listeners will have apprehended two distinct usages. It was not until 1553 , when Vicente Lusitano’s Introdutione facilissima was published, that a methodical procedure for learning to improvise on a cantus firmus was made available. His ‘secrets’ seem very simple, as he was presenting a basic method by which the technique could be learnt; it may well have been based on his

Article

Portugal, Republic of  

Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco and Manuel Carlos De Brito

Guatemala Cathedral. Portuguese musicians who lived outside the Iberian peninsula during the 16th century also included the humanist and amateur composer Damião de Góis ( 1502–74 ), a friend of Erasmus whose motet Ne laeteris was included by Glarean in his Dodechacordon , and Vicente Lusitano, who conducted a famous debate on modes with Nicola Vicentino in Rome. The true flowering of Portuguese sacred polyphony began with the publication in Lisbon of a volume of Magnificat settings ( 1613 ), followed by three books of masses (several based on Palestrina motets)