1-20 of 64 Results  for:

  • All: johann pachelbel x
Clear all

Article

Ewald V. Nolte

revised by John Butt

Kaul : ‘Zwei unbekannte Kompositionen von Johann Pachelbel’, ZMw , 16 (1934), 245–7 K. Matthaei : ‘Johann Pachelbel: zu seinem 300. Geburstag’, Musik und Gottesdienst , 7 (1953), 129–39 H.J. Moser : ‘Johann Pachelbel: zur 300. Wiederkehr seines Geburtstages’, Musik und Kirche , 23 (1953), 82–90 H.H. Eggebrecht : ‘Johann Pachelbel: zu seinem 250. Todestag’, Musica , 10 (1956), 252–6 E.V. Nolte : ‘Classic Contract between Pachelbel and Erfurt Church’, The Diapason , 48 (1956–7), 32 S. Orth : ‘Johann Pachelbel: sein Leben und Wirken in Erfurt’, Aus der

Article

Ewald V. Nolte

revised by John Butt and H. Joseph Butler

Pachelbel family German family of musicians. Individual Members Johann Pachelbel (b Nuremberg , bap. Sept 1, 1653; d Nuremberg , bur. March 9, 1706 ) Wilhelm Hieronymus Pachelbel (b Erfurt , bap. Aug 29, 1686; d Nuremberg , 1764 ) Charles Theodore Pachelbel (b Stuttgart , bap. Nov 24, 1690; d Charleston, SC , bur. Sept 15, 1750 )

Article

Robert L. Marshall

Choralfuge ) (1) A short organ composition in which the first line (occasionally the first two lines) of a chorale is treated as the subject of a fugue. Chorale fugues were composed mainly by late 17th-century central German composers, among them Pachelbel and several of Bach’s ancestors, notably Johann Christoph. Their function, like that of the chorale prelude, was to introduce the congregational singing of the chorale. (2) A synonym for Chorale ricercare. See Chorale settings.

Article

private collection, Bloomington, IL), the opening ritornello of which demonstrates PachelbeL’s knowledge of Baroque instrumental idioms; the lyrical vocal line is suggestive of bel canto. As the son of Johann Pachelbel and mentor of Peter Pelham, Charles Pachelbel served as a vital musical and cultural link between Europe and the New World. Bibliography V.L. Redway : ‘A New York Concert in 1736’, MQ , 22 (1936), 170–77 V.L. Redway : ‘Charles Theodore Pachelbel, Musical Emigrant’, JAMS , 5 (1952), 32–6 G.W. Williams : ‘Early Organists at St

Article

Ewald V. Nolte

revised by John Butt

Pachelbel, Wilhelm Hieronymus Member of Pachelbel family ( b Erfurt , bap. Aug 29, 1686; d Nuremberg , 1764 ). Composer , organist and harpsichordist , eldest son of (1) Johann Pachelbel. As a small boy in Erfurt he was the playmate of the somewhat older J.G. Walther. He lived with his father during his sojourns at Stuttgart ( 1690–92 ) and Gotha ( 1692–5 ) and moved with him to Nuremberg in 1695. His father taught him both composition and keyboard playing, and in the preface to his Hexachordum Apollinis ( 1699 ) expressed his confidence

Article

Durezza  

were explored by means of discords ( durezze ) and suspensions ( ligature ). Giovanni de Macque’s Durezze e ligature (MS, I-Nc ) are the first of their type, but numerous other composers wrote similarly striking works, including Ercole Pasquini, Trabaci, Frescobaldi, Kerll and Johann Pachelbel.

Article

Neufville [ Deneufville ], Johann Jacob de ( b Nuremberg , Oct 5, 1684; d Nuremberg , Aug 4, 1712 ). German composer. Born into a Huguenot family, he was the son of a merchant. For several years he was a pupil of Johann Pachelbel, who gave him instruction first in keyboard and later also in composition. According to Walther, in 1705 he was organist in a church in a suburb of Nuremberg. In November 1707 he made a journey to Italy to complete his education, and he stayed in Venice in February 1708. He returned to Nuremberg, through Graz and

Article

Eckelt [ Eckoldt ], Johann Valentin ( b Werningshausen, Erfurt , bap. May 8, 1673; d Sondershausen , Dec 18, 1732 ). German organist , composer and theorist. Although orphaned at the age of nine, Eckelt had a good grammar school education in Gotha and Erfurt. In the latter place he studied briefly with Johann Pachelbel. He became organist of the Liebfrauenkirche in Wernigerode in 1697. Andreas Werckmeister, who had connections with the town, may also have influenced his development. In 1701 or 1703 he moved to the Holy Trinity Church in

Article

Wolfgang Spindler

of the organ among instruments and the leading role of Nuremberg in the construction of wind instruments’ (Krautwurst). (2) Johann Christoph Weigel ( b Marktredwitz , bap. July 15, 1661; d Nuremberg , bur. Sept 3, 1726 ). Brother of (1) Christoph Weigel (i). Like his brother he settled in Nuremberg and worked there as an engraver and art dealer. Notable among the works he published are Pachelbel’s Erster Theil etlicher Chorale ( c 1700 ) and above all his own Musicalisches Theatrum ( c 1722 ). The latter is a collection of folio

Article

Buttstett [ Buttstädt , Buttstedt ], Johann Heinrich ( b Bindersleben, nr Erfurt , April 25, 1666; d Erfurt , Dec 1, 1727 ). German composer and theorist. He was one of four children of Johann Henricus Buttstett ( d 25 Dec 1702 ), pastor in Bindersleben, who had been educated at the University of Erfurt. He received his early education in Bindersleben, and at the age of 15 was sent to the Erfurt Ratsschule. As early as 1678 he began to study with Johann Pachelbel, organist at the Erfurt Predigerkirche. Buttstett's first appointment as organist

Article

Schmiedeknecht, Johann Matthäus ( b Ülleben, nr Gotha , 1660; d Gotha , April 1715 ). German composer and teacher. After working in Ichtershausen he became court Kantor in Gotha in 1685 and was a respected if not specially important music teacher. He had connections with the court Kapellmeisters Wolfgang Mylius and Christian Witt, and with the traditional musical institutions of Gotha, which were linked with the names of Pachelbel, Telemann and, in music education, Andreas Reyher. His Tyrocinium musices is related to Reyher’s Gothaer

Article

Mosco Carner

1927) [completion of C.F. Pohl’s biography] ed.: Sinfonie und Suite: von Berlioz bis zur Gegenwart (Berlin, 7/1932) [rev. and completion of A.F.H. Kretzschmar: Führer durch den Konzertsaal , ii (Leipzig, 1887)] Editions H. Botstiber , ed. with M. Seiffert : Johann Pachelbel: 94 Kompositionen: zumeist Fugen über das Magnificat für Orgel oder Klavier , DTÖ, 17, Jg.8/2 (Vienna, 1901/ R ) Wiener Klavier- und Orgelwerke aus der zweiten Hälfte des 17. Jahrhunderts , DTÖ, 27, Jg.13/2 (Vienna, 1906/ R ) Josef Strauss: Drei Walzer , DTÖ, 74, Jg.28/2 (Vienna

Article

Hugh J. McLean

( b ? Herschdorf, Königsee, Thuringia , Oct 1666; d Rudolstadt , June 13, 1734 ). German organist and composer. The most important influence on Vetter was that of Johann Pachelbel, with whom he studied in Erfurt from 1688 to 1690. Before then he had been a pupil of G.K. Wecker in Nuremberg and a student at the Gymnasium in Rudolstadt from 1683 to 1688. When Pachelbel left Erfurt for Stuttgart in 1690 , Vetter assumed his position at the Predigerkirche. In July of the following year he moved to Rudolstadt as the castle organist, being succeeded

Article

Douglas A. Lee

Leffloth, Johann Matthias [ Löffeloth, J. Matthäus ] ( b Nuremberg , bap. Feb 6, 1705; d Nuremberg , bur. Nov 2, 1731 ). German organist and composer. Leffloth was the son of Johann Matthias Leffloth, organist at St Margaretha in Nuremberg, from whom he received his first musical training; he probably also received some instruction from W.H. Pachelbel. Some time after 1722 he became organist at St Leonhard. Schubart presents the only noteworthy biographical sketch, an extravagant account which lauds Leffloth as a genius of marked musical

Article

Harold E. Samuel

lessons from G.C. Wecker (another of whose pupils at that time was Pachelbel). The early years of Krieger’s career are closely connected with the fortunes of his brother, through whom he obtained most of his positions. Mattheson stated that in 1671 he studied composition with his brother at Zeitz (although civic records there do not mention either of them) and that in 1672 he followed him to Bayreuth, where Johann Philipp had been appointed court organist. He was soon promoted to Kapellmeister and Johann took over the organist’s post, which he held, according to Mattheson

Article

Erfurt  

G. Kraft

revised by Dieter Härtwig

Hans Conradin , ed. V. Kalisch (Berne and Stuttgart, 1983), 21–34 U. Weiss , ed.: Erfurt 742–1992: Stadtgeschichte – Universitätsgeschichte (Weimar, 1992) See also Bach, §II: Family history Kruspe, Johann Eduard Luther, Martin, §1: Life Festival, §3: Choral festivals in England, Germany and Austria c1650–c1900 Pachelbel: (1) Johann Pachelbel, §1: Life

Article

Anton Würz

revised by Pamela M. Potter

et italiennes (Leipzig, 1900); ix: Verschellende gelegensheids-compositiën (Leipzig, 1901) Franz Tunder: Gesangswerke , DDT, 3 (1900/ R ) Johann Pachelbel, Wilhelm Hieronymus Pachelbel: Klavierwerke , DTB, ii, Jg.ii/1 (1901); Orgelkompositionen , DTB, vi, Jg.iv/1 (1903) Solokantaten und Chorwerke mit Instrumentalbegleitung [von] Matthias Weckmann and Christoph Bernard , DDT, 6 (1901/ R ) with H. Botstiber : Johann Pachelbel: 94 Kompositionen , DTÖ, 17, Jg.viii/2 (1901/ R ) Dietrich Buxtehude: Abendmusiken und Kirchenkantaten , DDT, 14 (1903/ R , 2/1957) Friedrich

Article

Christoph Wolff

of Telemann, who also conducted the Kapelle on occasion, and for a short while ( 1677–8 ) Pachelbel was a member of the Kapelle. During much of his time there Johann Christoph’s most important colleague must have been his cousin, the violinist Johann Ambrosius ( 11 ); Ambrosius often served as his copyist, and their relationship was doubtless a close one. The young Johann Sebastian must also have received his first impressions of organ music from his father’s cousin. While Johann Christoph’s court position was one of high standing, his tenure of the civic one was marred

Article

Harold E. Samuel

are important in the 17th-century teacher–pupil tradition of the Nuremberg school, stemming from Johann Staden through his pupil Kindermann to Schwemmer and Wecker and on to their pupils of the fourth generation, Nikolaus Deinl, J.B. Schütz, Maximilian Zeidler, Johann Krieger and Pachelbel. From Schwemmer they learnt singing and the rudiments of music, after which Wecker taught them keyboard instruments and composition. Other pupils of Wecker were Johann Löhner, the printer W.M. Endter, C.F. Witt and Nicolaus Vetter. Wecker clearly earned a measure of fame as an organist

Article

Christoph Wolff, Walter Emery, Peter Wollny, Ulrich Leisinger, and Stephen Roe

his son Johann Günther ( 33; see below) and a collection of works by Johann Pachelbel, J.C.F. Fischer and other 17th-century masters, including also some compositions of his own ( US-NH LM 4983 ). Johann Christoph Bach ( 28 ) ( b Eisenach, bap. 29 Aug 1676 ). Son of Johann Christoph ( 13 ). He was a harpsichordist in Erfurt. In 1702–3 he was in Lübeck (perhaps studying with Buxtehude) and on the death of Johann Christoph ( 13 ) both he and his brother Johann Nikolaus applied for their father's post as organist in Eisenach. However, their cousin Johann Bernhard